Jump to content


Photo

Motor Sport magazine - is it as good as it could be?


  • Please log in to reply
1132 replies to this topic

#901 uffen

uffen
  • Member

  • 1,875 posts
  • Joined: April 04

Posted 05 August 2019 - 13:28

Motor Sport really blew it big time this month. They have a big feature article on the Cooper Zerex Special of Roger Penske and go on and on about the car being restored and a wonder to behold. Complete horse manure. They apparently did no fact checking whatsoever. The car that they go ga-ga over is a replica through and through! The real Zerex Special is in Venezuela and has been for decades. It is in decrepit condition. The builders of the car in MS do not have the real car or any part of it. They apparently suckered MS in big time, and to me that is very disappointing. I had always considered MS to be an accurate publication, but printing this bull is simply unforgivable.

 

Tom

I trust you wrote to the editor to inform him, or her, of the issue.



Advertisement

#902 sabrejet

sabrejet
  • Member

  • 506 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 05 August 2019 - 13:49

Had me suckered too then: when I spoke to the owner at this year's MM he did nothing to disabuse my assumption that it was the real thing.



#903 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 9,029 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 05 August 2019 - 14:35

I trust you wrote to the editor to inform him, or her, of the issue.


My original complaint a few posts back was that Motor Sport were treating their readers as uneducated fools, but in fact it's much worse than that, our once-trusted magazine has been well and truly suckered, and big time! The car they've pictured and described at some length in the current issue is apparently an out and out fake, it apparently contains not one single component part of the original Cooper/Penske Zerex Special, which the Magazine laughably tries to pass off as "McLaren's forgotten CanAm Racer". Evidence? Well, take a look at the few most recent posts in another current TNF thread The "R" Words, in particularly those from long time TNF member T54, aka Philippe de Lespinay. Philippe knows quite a lot about the car and its history, including current whereabouts. I think he's also still the current owner of the Cooper T54 Indianapolis racer that Jack Brabham drove, and that car is still fitted with what P de L tells us is the sole surviving oversize Coventry Climax engine of the two that originally existed, . Philippe's wise words from the other TNF thread are copied below. This will save the curious from having to search for themselves, and I trust this is all OK under forum rules.


Just for your pleasure and amazement, now we have this replica pretending (at least in this journalistic piece) and claiming to be a "restoration" because of the use of some discarded bones of the original car, that is still in Venezuela to this day. Now, comparing the pictures of said bones published years ago in these very pages, funny but they don't match any part of the original vehicle as acquired by Bruce. Oh never mind...
... In any case, in my opinion, journalistic fraud and a black eye to an otherwise fine magazine, at least until recently.



Dave Morgan did not purchase the car from Roger Penske but from Bruce McLaren. Roger Penske no longer owned the car then, since he had sold it to John Mecom at the end of the 1962 season. Mecom in turn sold the car to McLaren in mid-1963. When the new McLaren Mk1 was first raced, the highly modified Cooper, that did not have much "Cooper" left on it, became surplus to requirement and was sold to Morgan. There could have been one person in-between. Morgan in turn sold the car to Leo Barbozza, who imported the car to Venezuela. It is still there today and many people tried to purchase its remains, to no avail.

Now, calling this brand new fabrication, that bears not a single part of the original car, a "restoration" is pure journalistic FRAUD. This car is a100% replica pretending to claim some form of genuineness from a bit of tubing supposedly left over from the rebuild by McLaren in 1964. It is as far as I and Cooper experts can tell, patently FALSE.
The genuine engine, that did time in the original Cooper-Zerex, has been back in the car for which it was originally built, the Cooper-Climax T54 Indy car, since 1989. It is one of two very special 2.8-liter engines built by Coventry-Climax for the 1961 "Indy 500", and the only survivor of the two.
Not very pleased with this story of misrepresentation, as it damages the high credibility of the magazine.


 

It appears that our previously loved and respected publication has a little explaining to do...


Edited by kayemod, 05 August 2019 - 17:56.


#904 sabrejet

sabrejet
  • Member

  • 506 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 05 August 2019 - 16:21

The cover certainly didn't go down well with me, that line, "McLaren's forgotten CanAm racer". Having been involved in the construction of a few of them, and having absorbed a lot of information about the cars and the series history, I wondered how one could have escaped my notice, but it turned out to be nothing more than the Cooper-based Penske Zerex Special, hardly "Forgotten", never a "Secret" and even less a "Mystery". The car was conceived, built and raced by Roger Penske before the CanAm series even existed, and it never raced in it in anything like the form written about in the MS feature. The first lines of the article inside are worse. "The Zerex Special is probably the most important and influential car you've never heard of". I'd agree that it's an interesting creation, and it was certainly important and influential as far as Bruce & Co were concerned, but a serious and mostly respected publication like Motor Sport shouldn't try to be sensational in this way, language like that is hardly appropriate in something aimed at grown-up followers of motor sport.

 

I won't join John Aston in his complaint about promos for hugely expensive car auctions, but it was fair criticism. Just where is the magazine trying to take its readership?

 

More to the point, if the magazine thinks that the Zerex Special (real or fake) is a car I've never heard of, I think that I am well outside of their target readership. So still the UK lacks a decent, quality historic/racing magazine. Surely there must be a significant market for something like that?



#905 bradbury west

bradbury west
  • Member

  • 5,699 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 05 August 2019 - 17:26

I agree with sabrejet above. It amazes me that the journo who wrote and titled it could be so dozy as to write what he wrote and that the Editor let him.... In my 61st year of buying and reading the magazine I often wonder in what direction they or I are now moving.
But then, that is only one of the items which bemuses / amuses / confuses me about MS and its readership. And for the benefit of John Aston, I do not yearn to be back in 1957.
Roger Lund

#906 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 49,243 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 05 August 2019 - 20:19

I'm going to defend Motor Sport on the article briefly.

 

One, yes, we have heard of the Zerex Special, but I doubt the casual observer flicking through the magazine in a railway stationer has not.  It never raced in an internationally famous series to the extent of being iconic.

 

And two, the article makes clear that it is basically built around thrown away bits of chassis cut out of the "original" - and says that the ur-Zerex is somewhere in South America.  So it isn't quite saying OMG lolz the genuine car Roger made untouched since 1967.



#907 opplock

opplock
  • Member

  • 618 posts
  • Joined: January 10

Posted 06 August 2019 - 15:17

I've now read the offending article. It should have been labelled as Advertising Feature being a promotional puff for the Goodwood Revival. The car is a facsimile and MS could have made that clear. As Ensign pointed out however there are enough clues in the article to lead all but the most gullible readers to that conclusion. Unfortunately lawyers and advertising departments have considerably more influence than in DSJ's time.



#908 Sterzo

Sterzo
  • Member

  • 1,416 posts
  • Joined: September 11

Posted 06 August 2019 - 16:31

Sadly, Motor Sport has joined all other publications in showing a mismatch between headlines and content. Books and mags everywhere over-use 'forgotten', 'hidden' and 'secret', words that should (like iconic) be banned from the language. I'm sort of immune to it now.



#909 PCC

PCC
  • Member

  • 850 posts
  • Joined: August 06

Posted 06 August 2019 - 17:05

Philippe de Lespinay has taken them to task in the comment section of the website promo for the article. To their great discredit, they have not responded - either to defend the article or to admit an error.



#910 nicanary

nicanary
  • Member

  • 608 posts
  • Joined: February 12

Posted 06 August 2019 - 19:01

Didn't Motor Sport once carry the strapline "The authoritative voice of the sport" ?



#911 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,424 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 13 August 2019 - 15:57

Today received some e-mail puffery from MS, featuring 'the most important and influential you've never heard of'. Clearly they have no shame ...



#912 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 9,029 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 14 August 2019 - 10:06

Today received some e-mail puffery from MS, featuring 'the most important and influential you've never heard of'. Clearly they have no shame ...

 

It gets worse. On the section of the MS website relating to the current issue, one of the following comments came from TNF's very own T54. He explained at some length what was wrong, both about the Penske/Cooper/Zerex article, and how the car written about was nothing more than a replica, an out and out fake, though this wouldn't have been clear to most readers, not even to fairly knowledge ones.  T54, or Philippe de Lespinay, was the long-term owner of the original Indianapolis Cooper that was raced by Jack Brabham, and he is unquestionably a leading authority of this car and its near relations. There were posts following T54's supporting him, one suggested that Motor Sport should issue a clarification, and maybe an apology for deliberately misleading readers. T54's original post, as well as related ones, all appear to have been removed from the site, which leads one to believe that the Magazine is its own censor, "They don't like it up 'em!" as Corporal Jones might have said.

 

I'm going to defend Motor Sport on the article briefly.

 

One, yes, we have heard of the Zerex Special, but I doubt the casual observer flicking through the magazine in a railway stationer has not.  It never raced in an internationally famous series to the extent of being iconic.

 

And two, the article makes clear that it is basically built around thrown away bits of chassis cut out of the "original" - and says that the ur-Zerex is somewhere in South America.  So it isn't quite saying OMG lolz the genuine car Roger made untouched since 1967.

 

In my original post on this subject, my main complaint concerned the line on the magazine's cover that included "McLaren" and "CanAm". This was just a dishonest attempt to grab the attention of casual readers, as the car could never honestly to be claimed to be either of these things, and the opening sentence of the article, "The most important and influential car you've never heard of" made everything much worse. Even the fairly casual observer on a presumably Clapham station platform is only likely to buy a specialist and fairly narrowly focused magazine like Motor Sport because he wants to learn, to be better informed about the sport's history and background. Sub-standard efforts like this entire Zerex article aren't going to help him very much are they?



#913 Myhinpaa

Myhinpaa
  • Member

  • 85 posts
  • Joined: April 11

Posted 14 August 2019 - 10:23

Just to be on the safe side, here's the comment(s) :

 

Philippe de Lespinay  12 days ago  edited

Scott Collins, 
Dave Morgan did not purchase the car from Roger Penske but from Bruce McLaren. Roger Penske no longer owned the car then, since he had sold it to John Mecom at the end of the 1962 season. Mecom in turn sold the car to McLaren in mid-1963. When the new McLaren Mk1 was first raced, the highly modified Cooper, that did not have much "Cooper" left on it, became surplus to requirement and was sold to Morgan. There could have been one person in-between. Morgan in turn sold the car to Leo Barbozza, who imported the car to Venezuela. It is still there today and many people tried to purchase its remains, to no avail.

Now, calling this brand new fabrication, that bears not a single part of the original car, a "restoration" is pure journalistic FRAUD. This car is a100% replica pretending to claim some form of genuineness from a bit of tubing supposedly left over from the rebuild by McLaren in 1964. It is as far as I and Cooper experts can tell, patently FALSE.

The genuine engine, that did time in the original Cooper-Zerex, has been back in the car for which it was originally built, the Cooper-Climax T54 Indy car, since 1989. It is one of two very special 2.8-liter engines built by Coventry-Climax for the 1961 "Indy 500", and the only survivor of the two.

Not very pleased with this story of misrepresentation, as it damages the high credibility of the magazine.

 
  •  
  •  
avatar92.jpg?1432139884
Peter Coffman  Philippe de Lespinay  9 days ago

I really think this post demands some kind of answer from the magazine - either an admission that they were hoodwinked by the owner, or a refutation that explains why that is not the case.

 



#914 Odseybod

Odseybod
  • Member

  • 1,424 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 14 August 2019 - 13:07

 

Just to be on the safe side, here's the comment(s) :

 

Philippe de Lespinay  12 days ago  edited

Scott Collins, 
Dave Morgan did not purchase the car from Roger Penske but from Bruce McLaren. Roger Penske no longer owned the car then, since he had sold it to John Mecom at the end of the 1962 season. Mecom in turn sold the car to McLaren in mid-1963. When the new McLaren Mk1 was first raced, the highly modified Cooper, that did not have much "Cooper" left on it, became surplus to requirement and was sold to Morgan. There could have been one person in-between. Morgan in turn sold the car to Leo Barbozza, who imported the car to Venezuela. It is still there today and many people tried to purchase its remains, to no avail.

Now, calling this brand new fabrication, that bears not a single part of the original car, a "restoration" is pure journalistic FRAUD. This car is a100% replica pretending to claim some form of genuineness from a bit of tubing supposedly left over from the rebuild by McLaren in 1964. It is as far as I and Cooper experts can tell, patently FALSE.

The genuine engine, that did time in the original Cooper-Zerex, has been back in the car for which it was originally built, the Cooper-Climax T54 Indy car, since 1989. It is one of two very special 2.8-liter engines built by Coventry-Climax for the 1961 "Indy 500", and the only survivor of the two.

Not very pleased with this story of misrepresentation, as it damages the high credibility of the magazine.

 
  •  
  •  
avatar92.jpg?1432139884
Peter Coffman  Philippe de Lespinay  9 days ago

I really think this post demands some kind of answer from the magazine - either an admission that they were hoodwinked by the owner, or a refutation that explains why that is not the case.

 

 

 

Funnily enough, it was still on their website yesterday. Maybe the e-mail campaign expedited its removal?



#915 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 9,029 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 14 August 2019 - 14:56

Funnily enough, it was still on their website yesterday. Maybe the e-mail campaign expedited its removal?

 

 

You're right, it's there again, but I'm sure it disappeared for a few days, I doubt if the two comments Myhinpaa posted here were the only ones they've received. Be interesting to see if there's "clarification" in the next issue.



#916 2F-001

2F-001
  • Member

  • 3,688 posts
  • Joined: November 01

Posted 15 August 2019 - 11:36

I’m not sure they were actually removed. At first I thought my browser might be showing me an earlier version of the page that it had cached (with those posts still intact), but having looked from another machine not on my network, it seems that that article appears on two different parts of the website with different comments below it, depending how you access it. Unfortunately the headers on that site don’t readily indicate exactly where you are in the structure.

Nevertheless, the magazine might do itself some good by responding, or at least acknowledging the controversy pending a fuller explanation.

Edited by 2F-001, 15 August 2019 - 11:41.


#917 brakedisc

brakedisc
  • Member

  • 207 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 17 August 2019 - 08:26

I was disappointed in the Carlin interview that the subject of him going bust, leaving a few bad debts in the process, before re inventing himself, was not mentioned. 



#918 Sterzo

Sterzo
  • Member

  • 1,416 posts
  • Joined: September 11

Posted 17 August 2019 - 20:44

At which point in his career did that happen, brakedisc; and do you mean bankruptcy or a company going into liquidation?


Edited by Sterzo, 17 August 2019 - 20:45.


#919 john aston

john aston
  • Member

  • 1,725 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 18 August 2019 - 06:00

It's a given isn't it , in this business ? I remember reading Virginia Williams autobiography and being appalled at the cavalier way creditors were ignored , customers ripped off and so on in the early days . 



Advertisement

#920 brakedisc

brakedisc
  • Member

  • 207 posts
  • Joined: February 07

Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:33

At which point in his career did that happen, brakedisc; and do you mean bankruptcy or a company going into liquidation?

 

Happened at the end of 2009.  "Restructured" was the phrase that was used.   :lol:  :lol:  :lol:



#921 sabrejet

sabrejet
  • Member

  • 506 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 19 August 2019 - 12:20

On a related topic I saw another one of those, "...you've never heard of" headlines on a Welsh newspaper website at the weekend (sadly can't find it now), along the lines of, "The Welsh sports car you've never heard of". Luckily my limited knowledge of Welsh sports car does go as far as Gilbern, so yet another massive assumption made by said rag.

 

I didn't look at the article (so maybe it was worth reading) but my reaction was one of annoyance at being taken for an ill-informed idiot.

 

Now why would a paper or magazine go out of its way to annoy its readership? Disinform yes; mislead obviously. But annoy? Strange.



#922 john winfield

john winfield
  • Member

  • 3,073 posts
  • Joined: July 02

Posted 19 August 2019 - 12:58

On a related topic I saw another one of those, "...you've never heard of" headlines on a Welsh newspaper website at the weekend (sadly can't find it now), along the lines of, "The Welsh sports car you've never heard of". Luckily my limited knowledge of Welsh sports car does go as far as Gilbern, so yet another massive assumption made by said rag.

 

I didn't look at the article (so maybe it was worth reading) but my reaction was one of annoyance at being taken for an ill-informed idiot.

 

Now why would a paper or magazine go out of its way to annoy its readership? Disinform yes; mislead obviously. But annoy? Strange.

I think it's the current journalistic style, Sabre, and I find it infuriating too. Along with 'All you Need to Know', 'The Essential Bla-Bla-Bla...', 'Why We All Love xyz...'. Nowadays nobody dares write a straightforward article. I understand the attraction of trying to humanise your work, and connect with your audience but, if the reader is left wanting to thump the author on the nose, something may have gone awry!



#923 Jack-the-Lad

Jack-the-Lad
  • Member

  • 2,138 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 19 August 2019 - 15:25

I think it's the current journalistic style, Sabre, and I find it infuriating too. Along with 'All you Need to Know', 'The Essential Bla-Bla-Bla...', 'Why We All Love xyz...'. Nowadays nobody dares write a straightforward article. I understand the attraction of trying to humanise your work, and connect with your audience but, if the reader is left wanting to thump the author on the nose, something may have gone awry!


Another annoying journalistic habit is the by-now common conceit of beginning an article or story with an anecdote or perhaps some seemingly unrelated reference, and then at the end of the piece circling back to the original anecdote or reference, thus putting a nice bow on a neatly wrapped package. I imagine the writer closing his laptop and feeling quite satisfied.....or in the case of a good writer, thinking, "I wish my editor wouldn't insist on this dross....."

#924 BRG

BRG
  • Member

  • 16,982 posts
  • Joined: September 99

Posted 19 August 2019 - 15:40

Another annoying journalistic habit is the by-now common conceit of beginning an article or story with an anecdote or perhaps some seemingly unrelated reference, and then at the end of the piece circling back to the original anecdote or reference, thus putting a nice bow on a neatly wrapped package. I imagine the writer closing his laptop and feeling quite satisfied.....or in the case of a good writer, thinking, "I wish my editor wouldn't insist on this dross....."

I have tried, but I still can't see why this is anything but decent writing.

 

Perhaps you would prefer the old school style:  "Fog in Channel:  Continent cut off"



#925 T54

T54
  • Member

  • 2,500 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 19 August 2019 - 23:10

"

Peter Coffman  Philippe de Lespinay  9 days ago

I really think this post demands some kind of answer from the magazine - either an admission that they were hoodwinked by the owner, or a refutation that explains why that is not the case."

I actually sent a letter to the magazine by email, denouncing that absolute fraud of a story, and plan to write a personal letter to the person who wrote that pack of lies.
Just to keep you posted.


Edited by T54, 19 August 2019 - 23:10.


#926 john aston

john aston
  • Member

  • 1,725 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:24

Another annoying journalistic habit is the by-now common conceit of beginning an article or story with an anecdote or perhaps some seemingly unrelated reference, and then at the end of the piece circling back to the original anecdote or reference, thus putting a nice bow on a neatly wrapped package. I imagine the writer closing his laptop and feeling quite satisfied.....or in the case of a good writer, thinking, "I wish my editor wouldn't insist on this dross....."

 It's called writing, it isn't a conceit and if you read  guys like David E Davis Russell Bulgin or  Pete Lyons (but not Bill Boddy ) you'll note that it's a common trait . And it is far preferable to the linear style of starting at the beginning and plodding on from there . 



#927 LordAston

LordAston
  • Member

  • 177 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 22 August 2019 - 15:58

tenor.gif

 

What have I created with this topic.....



#928 sabrejet

sabrejet
  • Member

  • 506 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 22 August 2019 - 16:24

 It's called writing, it isn't a conceit and if you read  guys like David E Davis Russell Bulgin or  Pete Lyons (but not Bill Boddy ) you'll note that it's a common trait . And it is far preferable to the linear style of starting at the beginning and plodding on from there . 

 

Personal taste then. I prefer linear and no pretence.



#929 BRG

BRG
  • Member

  • 16,982 posts
  • Joined: September 99

Posted 22 August 2019 - 16:31

Personal taste then. I prefer linear and no pretence.

Linear does not involve the reader unless they are already fully aware of the story.

 

I once did a course on public speaking.  The key message was to start by saying what you were going to say, then say it and then finish off by reminding the audience of what you have said.  Same with writing.



#930 PCC

PCC
  • Member

  • 850 posts
  • Joined: August 06

Posted 22 August 2019 - 17:06

Personal taste then. I prefer linear and no pretence.

There's a difference between pretence and craft. Completely uncrafted writing is excruciating to read. Sure, craft can become pretentious, or formulaic, but it is still indispensable to competent writing.



#931 proviz

proviz
  • Member

  • 556 posts
  • Joined: October 06

Posted 22 August 2019 - 17:54

Linear does not involve the reader unless they are already fully aware of the story.

 

I once did a course on public speaking.  The key message was to start by saying what you were going to say, then say it and then finish off by reminding the audience of what you have said.  Same with writing.

 

That is hugely simplistic. A lot like today's news broadcasts which often drive me mad. Something called writing needs at least a touch of sophistication. Or maybe just plain straightforward presentation. But with any repetition you have to be extremely careful.



#932 john aston

john aston
  • Member

  • 1,725 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 22 August 2019 - 17:56

Pretentiousness is a crime which many  good writers are charged with , often on the ground of not ignoring their own education , or  their readers', in their style . The linear approach may have been  fine for the nuts and bolts of a race  report in the pre TSL era but not any more . It is often the mark of the amateur ,who feels duty bound to start his deathless prose by telling  his readership that he had(spare me  :down: ) ' a hearty breakfast' ..  



#933 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 9,626 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 22 August 2019 - 19:54

:smoking:



#934 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 22,130 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 22 August 2019 - 21:03

Linear does not involve the reader unless they are already fully aware of the story.

I once did a course on public speaking. The key message was to start by saying what you were going to say, then say it and then finish off by reminding the audience of what you have said. Same with writing.

The only rules that apply are set by those who empower themselves before their students.

Edit: Haha, I just realized that very "key message" was quoted in a film, "Seven Pounds" and said as a board room joke the entire group laughed at. Only a movie, yes, but I laughed, too.

Art is art and unlimited in the pathways to a finished work. And Thankfully so.

Edited by E1pix, 23 August 2019 - 00:32.


#935 BRG

BRG
  • Member

  • 16,982 posts
  • Joined: September 99

Posted 28 August 2019 - 22:13

New issue of MS out today.  No sign of any Xerex Special retraction, although someone has written in to comment that the 500bhp claim for the V8 version is far too optimistic.   In another letter,  the captioning of Mouton's Quattro has been questioned and the Editor has agreed it was wrong.  But nothing about the Xerex Special story being wrong.  

 

Elsewhere DCN inveighs about the Mercedes paint-stripping tale so close to our hearts here.


Edited by BRG, 28 August 2019 - 22:14.


#936 robert dick

robert dick
  • Member

  • 1,133 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 30 August 2019 - 16:07

October 2019 issue, pages 104 - 105. Adjustment of photo comment concerning Barney Oldfield in No. 14 Maxwell:
It is not Santa Monica, November 1914.
The photo was taken during the San Diego Exposition race on the Point Loma peninsula, on Saturday, 9 January 1915. Barney Olfield and mechanic George Hill in a 450-cubic inch Maxwell. The Maxwell was entered by Harry Lord's Lord Motor Car Co., the Los Angeles Maxwell agency. Oldfield went out on lap 37 (distance was 51 laps of 5.9 miles) when the Maxwell caught fire. The sister car, No. 17 Maxwell driven by Billy Carlson, finished second behind Earl Cooper in a Stutz.
 



#937 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 9,029 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 30 August 2019 - 18:00

And yet another fairly unimportant one. On page 20 of the current issue, there's a photo of that over-rated but apparently "cool" Hollywood actor Steve McQueen. He's pictured standing in the cockpit of a buggy that's described as a "Myers Minx". If he's still with us, I wonder what the car's originator Bruce Meyers would think of that, but at least they got the actor's name right. Apparently that car is the one that appeared in "The Thomas Crown Affair", and it's about to be auctioned, I wonder what silly price that one will go for.



#938 D28

D28
  • Member

  • 1,501 posts
  • Joined: April 14

Posted 30 August 2019 - 23:57

And yet another fairly unimportant one. On page 20 of the current issue, there's a photo of that over-rated but apparently "cool" Hollywood actor Steve McQueen. He's pictured standing in the cockpit of a buggy that's described as a "Myers Minx". If he's still with us, I wonder what the car's originator Bruce Meyers would think of that, but at least they got the actor's name right. Apparently that car is the one that appeared in "The Thomas Crown Affair", and it's about to be auctioned, I wonder what silly price that one will go for.

Bruce Meyers is very much alive, at least was in Apr  of this year. See this interview with him at NY Auto Show. Inexcusable that Motor Sport wouldn't have a few proof readers to correct errors of this magnitude.

https://www.automobi...uggy-interview/



#939 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 9,626 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 06:28

Now don't be too smugly dismissive - Bruce's surname is Meyer, NOT 'Meyers'...

 

DCN



Advertisement

#940 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Moderator

  • 21,917 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 07:06

Are you sure, Doug?

6533-BFA5-2803-4-C4-C-8118-09-C42-ADCE63

4610-C456-C3-D8-4-B62-95-BE-E2776-D8-BB4

70-A4-F189-B5-CD-4091-8358-D1-C542192403

#941 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 9,626 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 07:30

:lol:   Meyer mistake?

 

https://www.sportsca...-museum-photos/

 

A different Bruce?

 

DCN



#942 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Moderator

  • 21,917 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 07:36

:lol:

Pity the poor - er - TNFer.  ;)

#943 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 49,243 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 31 August 2019 - 09:24

A surfeit of Bruce Meyers?



#944 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Moderator

  • 21,917 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 09:48

Both are car nuts from the LA area, but with rather different paths through life:

Bruce Meyer

Bruce Meyers

#945 Doug Nye

Doug Nye
  • Member

  • 9,626 posts
  • Joined: February 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 19:58

Serves me right for sticking my nose into a matter about which I know sweet -------   :cool:

 

DCN



#946 Tim Murray

Tim Murray
  • Moderator

  • 21,917 posts
  • Joined: May 02

Posted 31 August 2019 - 20:35

Not at all, Doug. I now know a lot about both Meyer and Meyers that I didn’t know yesterday.  ;)

#947 T54

T54
  • Member

  • 2,500 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 01 September 2019 - 02:20

 

New issue of MS out today.  No sign of any Xerex Special retraction

 

To their credit, I did receive an email from one of MotorSport's  main story writers in response to my rather strong correspondence, describing that he saw the story, knew that it was total BS and objected to it, but it was too late to stop it from going to print. The Editor's attitude now is to 'let it die', hoping that not too many know or care about the truth about that fantasy, and they do know that they have egg all over their face.
I think that they are also a bit afraid of being sued (like, any two-bit judge would laugh those liars out of a courtroom when shown the clear evidence of their fraud...).

Meanwhile, it will be difficult for Mr. Heacock and Co. to show or race that replica  in important events as the misrepresentation of their replica is now going all through the grapevine. Mr. Penske wants nothing to do with it and has asked persons in charge of certain Concours to refuse its entry.

Morality: if you build a nice replica, don't lie, and you will be far better off at the end of the day.

 



#948 opplock

opplock
  • Member

  • 618 posts
  • Joined: January 10

Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:34

I haven't read much of the October issue but I do hope that the editor suffered no ill effects after "scoffing blackberries" at Brands Hatch. We used to warn visiting marshals not to sample these as the blackberry bushes served as urinals every time a GP circuit meeting was held. Hopefully consumption is less dangerous now that MSV have provided us with portaloos.   



#949 kayemod

kayemod
  • Member

  • 9,029 posts
  • Joined: August 05

Posted 01 September 2019 - 16:41

Serves me right for sticking my nose into a matter about which I know sweet -------   :cool:

 

DCN

 

Ahem Doug, another one, and this time it's in something with your name on it, though I doubt if you're directly responsible.

 

It's in the Tony Matthews cutaway in your piece on the Williams FW07. Look at the text headed "Engine". Exhaust valve sizes are correctly quoted as being 29mm diameter, but just look at the figure for the inlet valves. The correct figure should be 34.5mm, but according to the text, they were 934.5mm diameter. That's just over three feet in old money, surely some mistake there I think.

 

I can guess what you're going to say, "I wondered who'd be the first to spot that, I just put the figure in as a joke." Don't suppose it really was your mistake, but it will give the rest of us  us a small amount of Schadenfreude-based amusement.



#950 E1pix

E1pix
  • Member

  • 22,130 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 01 September 2019 - 17:31

Cheater engine. ;-)