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Liberty to "turn F1 into Super Bowl"


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#51 TheCaptain

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 21:01

If it's along the lines of Austin where they had the Taylor Swift gig at the same time packaged together, then what the hell does it matter?    As long as they don't try to "spice up the show".     It makes perfect sense to open F1 to new possible audiences.    When it's stuck on pay TV then aside from current fans, how on earth is anyone even going to stumble across it?       We all got hooked for whatever reason, but 90% of us wouldn't be here if F1 was like it is today in terms of access to the sport.      Even if only 1% of the new audience that get dragged into the sport via whatever sideshow is put on stay, then it's a success.    



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#52 ClubmanGT

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 21:39

Qualifying races and sprint race bullshit here we come. It will end up like the Australian V8s where you have no idea how many races are on a day or how long they are, or like Formula E where no one gives a ****. 

 

The most successful 'gimmick' I have seen in motorsport was the works drives for local heroes in the WRC. You actually believed Possum Bourne could beat Carlos Sainz, so you went and watched. Bit hard to do in F1 but a good idea that didn't require molesting the format of the event to attract attention. 



#53 Norm

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:33

The whole thing sounds like a pig in lipstick approach to me.

 

The issue is the racing. Fix that and maybe people interested in actual racing will tune in and attend the races. Or ignore it altogether and we can look forward to the Lewis Hamilton Lip Sync Contest and Fashion Show or the Danny and Seb Comedy Hour.



#54 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:42

All this fluff worries me. If the racing is crap, who honestly cares? Let's get a financially sustainable series with multiple strong teams and drivers not made mute by corporate leashes. Let's see some personality and emotion. If the action is interesting you won't need to pay a clown like Bieber to mime, the crowds will come. Racing fans are drawn to racing.

Well ... this.

 

Sums it all up perfectly.



#55 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:47

Probably. I mean I don't think F1 should be road relevant. Formula E has that space. F1 should go back to being just extreme. No point in being road friendly.

 

Budget Cap is not nostalgic though. That was forward looking.

FE is road relevant? 

 

Agree with gist of your post tho. Esp the bold portion.


Edited by AustinF1, 29 December 2016 - 23:08.


#56 Marklar

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:52

The whole thing sounds like a pig in lipstick approach to me.

 

The issue is the racing. Fix that and maybe people interested in actual racing will tune in and attend the races. Or ignore it altogether and we can look forward to the Lewis Hamilton Lip Sync Contest and Fashion Show or the Danny and Seb Comedy Hour.

Based on the pre-race-threads here it seems like the vast majority cares a lot about sunglasses, hair, etc. of each driver. So it might be something which could be even popular for already existing racing fans   ;)

 

 

FE is road relevant? 

 

Whole point of this series



#57 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:55

If it's along the lines of Austin where they had the Taylor Swift gig at the same time packaged together, then what the hell does it matter?    As long as they don't try to "spice up the show".     It makes perfect sense to open F1 to new possible audiences.    When it's stuck on pay TV then aside from current fans, how on earth is anyone even going to stumble across it?       We all got hooked for whatever reason, but 90% of us wouldn't be here if F1 was like it is today in terms of access to the sport.      Even if only 1% of the new audience that get dragged into the sport via whatever sideshow is put on stay, then it's a success.    

I don't think the Swift performance drew many/any new fans into the sport. It was held several hours after qualifying ended, after 95% of racing fans had emptied out of the place. The Swift fans (overwhelmingly teen & pre-teen girls) were streaming in when the track was long cold and the place was empty.

 

As for getting hooked on F1 with pay TV, that's where I found F1. SPEED TV wasn't free when I found F1 there. Most people these days have pay tv, often with packages that include F1.


Edited by AustinF1, 29 December 2016 - 22:57.


#58 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:56

Whole point of this series

Sure, but it's only 'road relevant" to a tiny portion of vehicles on the road.



#59 scheivlak

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 22:57

 Most people these days have pay tv

Not everywhere around the world.



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#60 Clatter

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:05

Sure, but it's only 'road relevant" to a tiny portion of vehicles on the road.

 


Might currently be a tiny proportion, but its still a damn sight more road relevant than anything F1 does, despite what the manufacturers would like us to believe.

#61 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:07

Might currently be a tiny proportion, but its still a damn sight more road relevant than anything F1 does, despite what the manufacturers would like us to believe.

Indeed.

 

FE, WEC, and others are far more road-relevant and make much less of a show being so. Not that road-relevance is actually necessary...


Edited by AustinF1, 29 December 2016 - 23:10.


#62 Kalmake

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:12

Hasn't the gridiron stayed the same it always has been? They just have more and longer breaks. No gimmicks.



#63 Nathan

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:18


What I really think they can do media wise, is engage us more with free stuff though.

I know they want to be the "elite" when it comes to motorsport, but putting every single thing off limits to the fans with not much cash is a bad move as far as I'm concerned.

 

 Do you not visit www.formula1.com?



#64 pdac

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:22

FE is NOT road relevant because electric vehicles are NOT going to be the future (they are in the same category as 3D TV, I think)



#65 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:27

Hasn't the gridiron stayed the same it always has been? They just have more and longer breaks. No gimmicks.

No. There have been many rule tweaks in the name of providing more offense/scoring (read: entertainment), in the name of safety, regulating the length of the game, etc. Some good, some bad, but it hasn't been static.



#66 Norm

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:29

Based on the pre-race-threads here it seems like the vast majority cares a lot about sunglasses, hair, etc. of each driver. So it might be something which could be even popular for already existing racing fans   ;)

 

 

The opinion of this forum does not represent the opinions of Formula 1 fans throughout the world. It is a very small fraction of the fan base. You are correct though, many on this forum are more interested in the soap opera than they are the sport.



#67 TazioRaikkonen

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:34

Alex Wurz the legend of Monaco 1998 just said it today:

 

Make the cars super safe and turn up the speed to 450 km/h. I agree. Somebody critique this.

 

Why not? Honestly, what are we doing here?



#68 scheivlak

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:46

First and most important goal is to make F1 - or whatever it will be called - both financially sustainable and competitive. 450 km/h is not important to me at all if it results in the death of F1 in the way CanAm died post 1971/72.

 

Apart from that, to me craft is more important than speed.

.



#69 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:50

Alex Wurz the legend of Monaco 1998 just said it today:

 

Make the cars super safe and turn up the speed to 450 km/h. I agree. Somebody critique this.

 

Why not? Honestly, what are we doing here?

Not saying it can/can't/should/shouldn't be done, but the potential of significantly faster cars being more of a threat to track workers and fans would have to be a consideration.



#70 Clatter

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:50

Alex Wurz the legend of Monaco 1998 just said it today:

Make the cars super safe and turn up the speed to 450 km/h. I agree. Somebody critique this.

Why not? Honestly, what are we doing here?

All that means is the parade of cars will pass by quicker. It does nothing to address the lack of competition, overtaking and proper racing.

#71 minime

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:50

This forum will go into melt down if they change the race times to suit other time zones and Europe has to watch it in the middle of the night. I can see the Americanisation  of F1 causing a fair bit of angst among the European audience as the coming changes shift F1 away from European thinking and more towards the other side of the Atlantic. American thiking is about an family event centred on racing and racing per se is not the sole reason to attend. Get used to it.



#72 Marklar

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:54


This forum will go into melt down if they change the race times to suit other time zones and Europe has to watch it in the middle of the night.
I can see the Americanisation of F1 causing a fair bit of angst among the European audience as the coming changes shift F1 away from European thinking and more towards the other side of the Atlantic. American thiking is about an family event centred on racing and racing per se is not the sole reason to attend. Get used to it.

The Australian GP used to be at 3 am in the night. The other Asian races were no later than 5 am. This wouldnt be anything new at all.

Edited by Marklar, 29 December 2016 - 23:55.


#73 AustinF1

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 23:56

This forum will go into melt down if they change the race times to suit other time zones and Europe has to watch it in the middle of the night. I can see the Americanisation  of F1 causing a fair bit of angst among the European audience as the coming changes shift F1 away from European thinking and more towards the other side of the Atlantic. American thiking is about an family event centred on racing and racing per se is not the sole reason to attend. Get used to it.

I don't think that's the thinking of typical American F1 fans any more than it is the thinking of typical F1 fans anywhere else. The problem is that they're selling out the sport, just as with many other sports, in an effort to attract the casual fan. The casual fan, here just as anywhere else, doesn't care about the pure essence of the sport and needs other reasons to come out to the track, I guess. I think dismissing that as "American thinking" is a mistake. It's been happening for a while now.

 

IMHO, they should seek to solidify the core fan base as their top priority rather than chasing after the casual fan who doesn't give a rat's ass about F1...but what do I know.?


Edited by AustinF1, 29 December 2016 - 23:58.


#74 scheivlak

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 00:13

This forum will go into melt down if they change the race times to suit other time zones and Europe has to watch it in the middle of the night. I can see the Americanisation  of F1 causing a fair bit of angst among the European audience as the coming changes shift F1 away from European thinking and more towards the other side of the Atlantic. American thiking is about an family event centred on racing and racing per se is not the sole reason to attend. Get used to it.

If Americanisation means "more GPs in the Americas" it will fit perfectly to the European viewers. It means F1 being shown in the evening hours in Europe.

 

Here in NED the highest number of viewers have always been those of the Canadian/US/Brazilian GPs: more, and sometimes far more, than a 1.000.000.

 

No European GP has ever come close to that.



#75 turssi

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 00:27

As in once a year and in a stadium? Well that's easy, just drop all events but GP México and there you have it!

Not sure if I would make it so, but if you have a vision, then go and follow it!

#76 Fastcake

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 00:30

This forum will go into melt down if they change the race times to suit other time zones and Europe has to watch it in the middle of the night. I can see the Americanisation  of F1 causing a fair bit of angst among the European audience as the coming changes shift F1 away from European thinking and more towards the other side of the Atlantic. American thiking is about an family event centred on racing and racing per se is not the sole reason to attend. Get used to it.

 

If we count a start time before 7am as middle of the night (as ratings wise it might as well be), the only races that Europe will ever watch at that time will be the races held in East Asia and Australia, which already have races on in the middle of the night. With South America already in a good time zone for North America, and the European races themselves obviously not changing, which races do you see changing their start times to suit an American audience while inconveniencing Europeans?

 

I don't think that's the thinking of typical American F1 fans any more than it is the thinking of typical F1 fans anywhere else. The problem is that they're selling out the sport, just as with many other sports, in an effort to attract the casual fan. The casual fan, here just as anywhere else, doesn't care about the pure essence of the sport and needs other reasons to come out to the track, I guess. I think dismissing that as "American thinking" is a mistake. It's been happening for a while now.
 
IMHO, they should seek to solidify the core fan base as their top priority rather than chasing after the casual fan who doesn't give a rat's ass about F1...but what do I know.?


A nice thought, but everyone I've heard talking about "solidifying the core fan base" is uttering just as much an empty platitude as those advocating "expanding the fan base", or "reaching new demographics", or "Brexit means Brexit". Unless someone can actually tell us what they plan to do, it's complete waste of everyone's time.

#77 turssi

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 00:36

How can you watch a race in the way you describe.

Both the BBC and Sky have already broadcasted multi channel content with onboard views, and they've found that nobody watches the other views because you can't follow a race from a single onboard feed.

What you're describing is just useless gimmicks that people watch once before they go back to the main commentary feed.


Multi broadcasting will work when television walls are a household item.

#78 minime

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 01:16

 

If we count a start time before 7am as middle of the night (as ratings wise it might as well be), the only races that Europe will ever watch at that time will be the races held in East Asia and Australia, which already have races on in the middle of the night. With South America already in a good time zone for North America, and the European races themselves obviously not changing, which races do you see changing their start times to suit an American audience while inconveniencing Europeans?

 
A nice thought, but everyone I've heard talking about "solidifying the core fan base" is uttering just as much an empty platitude as those advocating "expanding the fan base", or "reaching new demographics", or "Brexit means Brexit". Unless someone can actually tell us what they plan to do, it's complete waste of everyone's time.

 

I see races held in other parts of the world changing to suit the US especially the west coast but it is purely speculation as every post here is so I may as well put the tin foil hat on as well. 



#79 loki

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:03

IMHO, they should seek to solidify the core fan base as their top priority rather than chasing after the casual fan who doesn't give a rat's ass about F1...but what do I know.?

 

What you're calling the core fan base of F1 is like in most all other motorsport, are dying and not being replaced fast enough, or in some cases at all with a younger demographic.  In the last 30-40 years I've been going to race, in the US and in Europe, many, perhaps most of the people attending are not what would be considered hard core, or even core fans.  Think those 300k plus in Indianapolis every May follow Indycar in depth all season?  If they did places like Phoenix or Fontana wouldn't struggle to get 20k to show up.  In all forms of commercial motorsport the primary paying audience is not comprised of hard core fans like those posting on this forum.

 

The 500, Long beach, Toronto, those are all destination events.  The center point is the race but there are other non motorsport events that support the race and offer something more to those that attend.  Monaco is a destination event as is Singapore and even Abu Dhabi.  In fact Singapore has a large music festival in conjunction with the race.   People are taking a relatively innocuous statement (one not from the new owners, no less) and are blowing it up into something it's not.  Were it someone like Thee Lewis making these statements instead of "those yanks" they would be worshipped as gospel.   It's 2016, getting people to attend events isn't like it was 20 or even 10 years ago.

 

For those that bothered to actually read the article instead of jumping to conclusions it's not a radical idea.

 

Rebuild/strengthen the core market in Europe.  Add another race in the US market.  Promote the sport.  Get a cohesive digital strategy.  Add more value to the events by adding other elements to support the race and draw more people to the event.  Promote the personalities and human element of the event.  Nothing about any of this other kack that's being posted here.



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#80 efuloni

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:20

We need to be realistic. F1 is losing the fan base. Maybe, just maybe, its not really about competition. Its about a thing (motorsport) that is not so interesting anymore, mainly because now people have lots of other sources of fun. Im not saying this is the reason, but what if it is? Then maybe they should look for something new. Even though it may not please us (the old fans), it could get new ones. Cause we are getting older and the young folks dont like F1 like we did.

 

All in all, I think the future is shorter races indeed. The 2016 kids dont have time to sit and watch a F1 race for 2 hours anymore. But that's just my opinion, which is based on nothing except my own point of view. I have no data do backup this.


Edited by efuloni, 30 December 2016 - 05:20.


#81 Tsarwash

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:31

I think that's a way to take F1 forward. F1 with cars and technology is more glamorous and a show than a sport like Football or Cricket. Many don't even consider F1 a proper sport. To get F1 more fans we need to really show off the Wow factor in F1 compared to other sports with faster cars and more exposure. One of the biggest markets for sports is America and we need to appeal to them.

It's not a proper sport. Motor racing is unlike any other sport, in that you must have the correct equipment to have a chance to win, and that equipment is usually only ever available to a small amount of participants. And occasionally inferior competitors are given equipment that gives them such an advantage that they beat superior participants. Where can you find that in ANY other sport ?



#82 Tsarwash

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:46

We need to be realistic. F1 is losing the fan base. Maybe, just maybe, its not really about competition. Its about a thing (motorsport) that is not so interesting anymore, mainly because now people have lots of other sources of fun. Im not saying this is the reason, but what if it is? Then maybe they should look for something new. Even though it may not please us (the old fans), it could get new ones. Cause we are getting older and the young folks dont like F1 like we did.

 

All in all, I think the future is shorter races indeed. The 2016 kids dont have time to sit and watch a F1 race for 2 hours anymore. But that's just my opinion, which is based on nothing except my own point of view. I have no data do backup this.

Not true at all. Younger people watch films and and are quite happy to watch for instance four episodes of Game of Boobs in a row on catch up. I was the same when I was younger, I remember watching constant, back-to-back Simpsons episodes on video, which had the adverts and all opening and closing credits edited out, until my brain started bleeding. That lasted for about four hours.



#83 Gretsch

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:48

Currently business fucuses on teams while most viewers, most fans, focus on the drivers. That is a problem. Yes, a Verstappen fan is also a RBR fan but he or she would be a Ferrari fan if Max would go there. That is a huge difference compared to most other team sports. Fans of a certain football club might love one of their players and hate him the next day when he moves to another club. Same goes for hockey, handball and, I assume, baseball.

I believe that needs to be sorted somehow, it cannot be both a team- and a individual sport and the 2016 season is proof of that. The fans and the team owners must agree on what is important and focus on that. 



#84 efuloni

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 06:18

Not true at all. Younger people watch films and and are quite happy to watch for instance four episodes of Game of Boobs in a row on catch up. I was the same when I was younger, I remember watching constant, back-to-back Simpsons episodes on video, which had the adverts and all opening and closing credits edited out, until my brain started bleeding. That lasted for about four hours.

 

I say apples and oranges. It is simply not the same thing, not the same kind of fun. As I said, motorsport might be between the things that 'used to be cool but aren't so cool anymore'. Everyone's gotta a car now, you can pretend to drive in a videogame, watch vídeos about it all day long and, worst, its not something a kid can play in the backyard like other sports. As I said, I might be tottaly wrong about all of this, but I really think that the format of F1 as we know has two options: become kinda a small thing, like all the other motorsport series, or change a lot and adapt itself.

 

 

Currently business fucuses on teams while most viewers, most fans, focus on the drivers. That is a problem. Yes, a Verstappen fan is also a RBR fan but he or she would be a Ferrari fan if Max would go there. That is a huge difference compared to most other team sports. Fans of a certain football club might love one of their players and hate him the next day when he moves to another club. Same goes for hockey, handball and, I assume, baseball.

I believe that needs to be sorted somehow, it cannot be both a team- and a individual sport and the 2016 season is proof of that. The fans and the team owners must agree on what is important and focus on that. 

 

I have this weird idea that drivers should take turns in the teams. Change each race and then we would have a completely separated WCC and WDC. But I know that, for many reasons, this is kind of impossible.

 

But I wish that, at least, that the contracts couldn't last more than one year, so every year we would have a pretty crazy silly season and we would see a lot more changes, being able to know better how good a driver is.


Edited by efuloni, 30 December 2016 - 06:19.


#85 kapow

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 07:28

Fixing F1 isn't difficult.

1) Make the racing better by making it easier to overtake without having to use DRS - Sporting gimmicks are never good

2) Stop the track limits nonsense - It isn't an issue in Indy Car, there's no reason for it be an issue in F1. Also stop any other rules nonsense - Grid penalties could easily be changed into constructor points deductions. Stop messing with the racing!

3) Put it on free TV. I know plenty of people, casual sport fans, who don't watch F1 now but they used to

4) Go to circuits where people actually turn up to watch the race. How great does Mexico look with packed grandstands? Spa was full of fans this year and the director made sure we saw it constantly throughout the race. Was anyone even there at Baku?

5) Expanding the number of races in the US isn't a bad thing if it works. The sport market there is huge and so is the sponsorship potential. Let's also not forget that F1 IS western Europe. At least 50% of the races have to be in western Europe.

6) If you want to spice up the weekend, make it an event - great. Publicity breads interest and sponsorship

7) Make the payments fairer. A team like Force India shouldn't be struggling financially.

Edited by kapow, 30 December 2016 - 07:29.


#86 404KF2

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 07:50

I don't watch the Superbowl and I'm even less likely than I am now to watch F-1 if it's presented like that!  If the racing bites, the show is not worth watching, period.



#87 RECKLESS

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 09:11

Reading the article I think people are overreacting to this.

 

The Superbowl reference is silly, other than that there are good points.



#88 johnmhinds

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 09:36

Fixing F1 isn't difficult.

1) Make the racing better by making it easier to overtake without having to use DRS - Sporting gimmicks are never good

2) Stop the track limits nonsense - It isn't an issue in Indy Car, there's no reason for it be an issue in F1. Also stop any other rules nonsense - Grid penalties could easily be changed into constructor points deductions. Stop messing with the racing!

3) Put it on free TV. I know plenty of people, casual sport fans, who don't watch F1 now but they used to

4) Go to circuits where people actually turn up to watch the race. How great does Mexico look with packed grandstands? Spa was full of fans this year and the director made sure we saw it constantly throughout the race. Was anyone even there at Baku?

5) Expanding the number of races in the US isn't a bad thing if it works. The sport market there is huge and so is the sponsorship potential. Let's also not forget that F1 IS western Europe. At least 50% of the races have to be in western Europe.

6) If you want to spice up the weekend, make it an event - great. Publicity breads interest and sponsorship

7) Make the payments fairer. A team like Force India shouldn't be struggling financially.

Other than the track limits stuff (more linked the the FIA than the promoter) the article covers all of those things.

The trouble is you can't do much about the other stuff because Bernie has spent the last few years doing really awful deals and locking the tracks/teams/tv companies into multi year contracts and bending over and letting the teams have too much control over the regulations to get them to vote his way.

It isn't going to be easy to walk back from all of the mess he made.

Edited by johnmhinds, 30 December 2016 - 09:39.


#89 ANF

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 10:33

Promote rivalries?  Punch-up at the weigh-in?

3734.jpg

#90 jonpollak

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 10:38

Currently business fucuses

 

The way I read this... says it all.

 

Currently, Business Fcukes Us

 

Jp


Edited by jonpollak, 30 December 2016 - 10:38.


#91 TazioRaikkonen

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 10:51

Not saying it can/can't/should/shouldn't be done, but the potential of significantly faster cars being more of a threat to track workers and fans would have to be a consideration.

Actually I would argue a speed increase of that much would be visually spectacular enough to offset a lack of wheel to wheel racing. 450 km/h? Unreal. increasing the speed by at least 100 km/h will make a difference. I would love to see 500 km/h down the main straight at Monza.

 

This sounds crazy but F1 needs to be extreme to survive in my view.

 

We should go back to circuits with very high speed corners. Which would also make the racing better in my view.



#92 LORDBYRON

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:11

This forum will go into melt down if they change the race times to suit other time zones and Europe has to watch it in the middle of the night. I can see the Americanisation  of F1 causing a fair bit of angst among the European audience as the coming changes shift F1 away from European thinking and more towards the other side of the Atlantic. American thiking is about an family event centred on racing and racing per se is not the sole reason to attend. Get used to it.

It wont happen not in the usa any way as its been well stated in the past the the american public will always choose the Daytona 500 over a not knowing crap F1 race viewing numbers will never be there for  3pm usa start

 

If they persisted in this option it would end up being the death of F1 in the usa  


Edited by LORDBYRON, 30 December 2016 - 11:12.


#93 DS27

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:11

On TV you can't really tell whether they are doing 350, 400 or 450 and I don't really care to be honest, as long as there is some actual racing going on. Yes, F1 lap times should be quicker than other series, and the cars should be spectacular to look at (and listen to...), but I suspect top speed is way down on the list of things that will improve the sport.



#94 ExFlagMan

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 12:11

Actually I would argue a speed increase of that much would be visually spectacular enough to offset a lack of wheel to wheel racing. 450 km/h? Unreal. increasing the speed by at least 100 km/h will make a difference. I would love to see 500 km/h down the main straight at Monza.
 
This sounds crazy but F1 needs to be extreme to survive in my view.
 
We should go back to circuits with very high speed corners. Which would also make the racing better in my view.

How far away from the track would you put the spectators.
It only takes one loose wheel into the crowd seen on live TV and F1 is history...

#95 Clatter

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 12:21

Actually I would argue a speed increase of that much would be visually spectacular enough to offset a lack of wheel to wheel racing. 450 km/h? Unreal. increasing the speed by at least 100 km/h will make a difference. I would love to see 500 km/h down the main straight at Monza.

This sounds crazy but F1 needs to be extreme to survive in my view.

We should go back to circuits with very high speed corners. Which would also make the racing better in my view.

Just watching a car go down the straight fast is not exciting. If you want that then go drag racing where the acceleration and speed can be insane. Watching a car at speed taking a corner on the limit of traction is, but the need to look after the tyres has largely deprived of us of that for a while. But you cannot beat the excitement of wheel to wheel racing, without that the audience will continue to dwindle.

Edited by Clatter, 30 December 2016 - 12:23.


#96 Radoye

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 12:46

Probably. I mean I don't think F1 should be road relevant. Formula E has that space. F1 should go back to being just extreme. No point in being road friendly.
 
Budget Cap is not nostalgic though. That was forward looking.


3 liter V10 engines aren't really extreme. Today we have the same kind of power output produced by half the capacity. To me, that is more extreme, especially since this is achieved despite the fuel flow / total capacity limitations put in place.



#97 RECKLESS

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 13:02

3 liter V10 engines aren't really extreme. Today we have the same kind of power output produced by half the capacity. To me, that is more extreme, especially since this is achieved despite the fuel flow / total capacity limitations put in place.

I fully agree.

 

The only thing extreme that's missing today is the glorious noise.



#98 Radoye

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 13:07

I fully agree.

 

The only thing extreme that's missing today is the glorious noise.

 

And frankly, i can live without the noise, it is not a dealbreaker for me.



#99 Atreiu

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 13:58

For starters, I don't see how there can be an apt comparision between a GP, nevertheless a full F1 season, to the Super Bowl. But the idea of making greater events out of GP weekends and actually promoting F1 with some real marketing based decisions seems good.

 

First thing they should do is heavily revamp and cut the calendar.



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#100 kapow

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 14:16

For starters, I don't see how there can be an apt comparision between a GP, nevertheless a full F1 season, to the Super Bowl. But the idea of making greater events out of GP weekends and actually promoting F1 with some real marketing based decisions seems good.

First thing they should do is heavily revamp and cut the calendar.


How would you revamp it and why would you cut it?