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coming to an ERS near you...


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#1 WoORules

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 15:56

developments on battery technology.   seems like obvious application EVERYWHERE... especially ERS system in F1.

 

Atom-thin water layers may lead to faster electric cars

article HERE. 



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#2 Afterburner

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 17:15

Aaand it's made of tungsten. You'd need the extra power to compensate the extra weight.

 

This is kinda like the hullaballoo about sodium batteries. Sure, more efficient than Li-ion, but heavier. Lithium is still king.



#3 HP

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 02:12

That article is an add, and really misleading IMO. The following line makes not much sense at all.

 

 

but what about the speed of delivering that energy?

 

Anyone familiar with how electricity works, should raise an eyebrow or two.



#4 Greg Locock

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 05:52

Solving the wrong problem, power density is more or less good enough  . Now, that isn't to say it is not a good idea to research this stuff, the truth is that battery chemistry/physics is still one of those fields where suck it and see beats careful analysis.



#5 gruntguru

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 06:18

 

Solving the wrong problem, power density is more or less good enough

Yes - don't hear too many EV knockers mocking the acceleration (power/weight). Its always about the range (energy/weight)



#6 blkirk

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 15:39

I could see something like this being used as a surge battery to absorb braking energy.  You aren't as worried about total capacity as you are about charging rate.  If you've got one small, high C battery that can store enough energy to get the vehicle up to highway speed, then the rest of the batteries just need to be able to supply the energy to overcome drag and rolling resistance.  Those batteries can be optimized for energy density (range).



#7 Greg Locock

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 04:46

Yes, that is a valid approach. We had two battery technologies fitted to our 1993 solar car, to exploit the advanatages of each,and we also had supercaps for regen braking tho that didn't get used on the race