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Good morning Vietnam! It’s 6:00 in the morning, what’s the O stand for? It stands for oh look at that F1 car!


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#1 Graveltrappen

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:00

https://www.motorspo...tnam-gp-961514/

Another new venue for F1... 25 races will be overkill I think but hey ho! When there was 18 I watched every single race, nowadays (and I’d have considered myself among the most hardcore of ‘hardcore fans’) I will Sky+ the race and watch it back later.... sometimes fastforwarding through chunks of it... and sometimes now I’ve found myself not even bothering dodging the result if I’ve been at work and just reading the result and deleting the recording

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#2 DaytimeUTT

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:09

Maybe things like Sky+ is what's diluting our enjoyment? I admit I'm getting like you with not caring so much. But I wonder if we were still spoonfed race feeds like it was 1991 on the BBC, if we would still enjoy 25 races? I think we would. It's just all the saturation now. YouTube videos galore, driver Twitter feeds, the ability to rewind and fast forward live TV that we just want to get to the "good stuff" instead of enjoying the process as a whole because out attention is being grabbed so much these days by everything around us.

 

We even have cameras on the champagne bottles now! We're saturated.



#3 Risil

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:10

Singapore GP works well, why not have more of them??? That'll be ten million dollars consulting fee please.



#4 PayasYouRace

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:14

I really wish the formula one world championship would be held the countries that have and do contribute most to world motorsport.

If a new country wants to join the party they should bring something, such as having an internationally recognised national championship or having drivers and teams competing at international or world level.

#5 Graveltrappen

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:15

I really wish the formula one world championship would be held the countries that have and do contribute most to world motorsport.

If a new country wants to join the party they should bring something, such as having an internationally recognised national championship or having drivers and teams competing at international or world level.


But... the Korean Grand Prix worked out to be a thoroughly successful and well attended event that did great things for motorsport in Korea.

Didn’t it?

#6 Atreiu

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:17

I really wish the formula one world championship would be held the countries that have and do contribute most to world motorsport.

If a new country wants to join the party they should bring something, such as having an internationally recognised national championship or having drivers and teams competing at international or world level.

 

 

How would that work when a country like Germany dropps out?



#7 PayasYouRace

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:19

How would that work when a country like Germany dropps out?


How would what work? Germany contributes a hell of a lot to world motorsport and should host a world championship round.

#8 Ivanhoe

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:22

I really wish the formula one world championship would be held the countries that have and do contribute most to world motorsport.
If a new country wants to join the party they should bring something, such as having an internationally recognised national championship or having drivers and teams competing at international or world level.

That's like having the WC Football only in England, Germany, France, Brazil and Spain. Sounds like protectionism, and nothing will ever change. How about the Monaco then? Hungary, Malaysia, Mexico?

Edited by Ivanhoe, 06 October 2017 - 19:24.


#9 PayasYouRace

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:25

That's like having the WC Football only in England, Germany, France, Brazil and Spain. Sounds like protectionism, and nothing will ever change. How about the Monaco then? Hungary, Malaysia, Mexico?


All have done a great deal, even before getting their rounds.

#10 RainyAfterlifeDaylight

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:28

I've always been a fan of exploring new places because they could have a good potential and at the same time I understand that exploring new places could backfire as well but it remains to be seen.


Edited by RainyAfterlifeDaylight, 06 October 2017 - 19:31.


#11 Ivanhoe

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:30

I'd love to have Istanbul back on the calendar. No history whatsoever, but a great track.

#12 DaytimeUTT

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:41

History must be made. The only way to do that is to explore new opportunities. Monza was new once. I'm sure in due time Red Bull will be seen as a "historic" team.

 

I already love Baku, "historic" races have already been made, for me.

 

Why not have Vietnam? It might just take off. Snooker has become all the rage in China now. You never know.

 

Agree with Ivanhoe about Istanbul, a great track.


Edited by DaytimeUTT, 06 October 2017 - 19:41.


#13 johnmhinds

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 19:41

Them mentioning Vietnam is probably just a move to put some pressure on whatever deal they are working on with Beijing since that is the only named location for a race in the article.

 

 

If they had any serious deal going on for a city race in Vietnam then they'd be mentioning Ho Chi Minh or Hanoi and not just a vague "race in Vietnam" and talks with "officials in the country".


Edited by johnmhinds, 06 October 2017 - 20:00.


#14 LiftAndCoast

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 20:13

There have been talks with many prospective hosts over the last few years that have led to nothing.  And if you want to create some bidding tension when the time comes to talk hosting fees with your existing race promoters, it pays to have a queue of others wanting to host their own race. 

 

I'll decide how I feel about a Vietnamese GP if and and when it actually happens, just as I will when the Thai, South African, Greek and Argentinian GPs are announced.



#15 JHSingo

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 20:50

Liberty: if, by some chance, you're reading this - more doesn't always equal better.

 

Once upon a time, hosting a Grand Prix was an honour, a privilege, for a select few countries. Let's keep it that way, rather than sullying the sport by racing at places that add nothing to the calendar.

 

I'd much rather F1 have a shorter calendar, consisting of the best tracks, or at least held in countries where there's an existing/historic interest or involvement in motor racing. I understand trying to grow the brand, but let's have quality over quantity, please.


Edited by JHSingo, 06 October 2017 - 20:51.


#16 ArrowsLivery

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 20:53

https://www.motorspo...tnam-gp-961514/

Another new venue for F1... 25 races will be overkill I think but hey ho! When there was 18 I watched every single race, nowadays (and I’d have considered myself among the most hardcore of ‘hardcore fans’) I will Sky+ the race and watch it back later.... sometimes fastforwarding through chunks of it... and sometimes now I’ve found myself not even bothering dodging the result if I’ve been at work and just reading the result and deleting the recording

 

I think the issue is that most rounds have become very similar. It's always a similar Tilke track, always the same teams at the front of the field, the cars all look the same, etc. It is very homogenized and it's very rare that there are surprises. 

 

I really wish the formula one world championship would be held the countries that have and do contribute most to world motorsport.

If a new country wants to join the party they should bring something, such as having an internationally recognised national championship or having drivers and teams competing at international or world level.

 

Only so many countries had the "pleasure" to industrialize in the 19th century and they've mostly controlled the motor vehicle market ever since. How are new countries going to get into motorsport without something like an F1 race to launch an interest?

 

How would what work? Germany contributes a hell of a lot to world motorsport and should host a world championship round.

 

What if Germany doesn't want to pay fair price to host the race? 



#17 JHSingo

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 21:03

How are new countries going to get into motorsport without something like an F1 race to launch an interest?

 

 

There's no evidence to say even holding an F1 race will generate interest though.

 

I mean, how long has F1 been racing in China for now? Well over a decade. Yet there was a story this week, saying that in research done for Liberty Media, that F1 was the least popular in...China!

 


 

The survey focussed on sports fans (not limited to motorsport) in seven key markets: the UK, USA, Germany, Italy, Brazil, China and Russia.

 

...

 

Of the markets, Italy has the most avid fans, while China and the USA have the least - no surprises there.

https://www.motorspo...esearch-961198/

 

It's not a good look for F1 to be racing in front of empty grand stands, no matter how large the country or "important" the market, in my view.



#18 ArrowsLivery

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 23:27

F1 doesn't race in front of empty grand stands in China. Just because the massive grandstand at the banked turn isn't open doesn't mean there's no spectators at the track. 

 

As for China and the USA being the least interested in F1, it's definitely expected. The other countries in the poll are either European, where the series is based, or have had massive success in the sport over the past 2-3 decades. 



#19 Nonesuch

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 23:42

If people make a track like Spa or Suzuka they could put it on Antarctica for all I care. The race in Monaco isn't magically more interesting because some guys raced there in the 1920s.

 

TgqB0zR.jpg?1

 

Let the money guys worry about which country "brings" this or that. I'll just enjoy seeing the cars lean on the edge of the grip through Spoon and Pouhon. :up:

 

Vietnam sounds good, but I hope they make serious work of getting an African round, too. I know the FIA says three continents is good enough, but why not go everywhere? With 25 races that should be do-able.


Edited by Nonesuch, 06 October 2017 - 23:47.


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#20 Nonesuch

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 23:47

I mean, how long has F1 been racing in China for now? Well over a decade. Yet there was a story this week, saying that in research done for Liberty Media, that F1 was the least popular in...China!

 

While not surprising given the Euro-centric nature of F1 - you still need "only" 4,5% of Chinese to be interested in F1 to have more people watching than live in the entire UK.

 

Heck, even just the Shanghai area has half the population of the UK.



#21 Atreiu

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 00:29

How would what work? Germany contributes a hell of a lot to world motorsport and should host a world championship round.

 

 

So we hold them hostage and force them to hold a GP no matter the current public indifference to F1?

 

---

 

Anyhow, I have nothing against expanding the calendar, but only as long as it's done intelligently. Going after quick cash grabs is a proven mistake. But it's also a mistake to let some countries host GP based on pure nostalgia if the population isn't honestly interested.

 

If it were up to me, the calendar would be no longer than 18 GPs. 17 being the perfect number.


Edited by Atreiu, 07 October 2017 - 00:34.


#22 RacingGreen

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 01:00

Like China, Vietnam has been slowly been developing a one party mixed economy so it may be timely to think about holding international motor sport events there, but as far as I know the country's first track opened only in March last year (http://www.thanhnien...nth-59750.html) so they have little domestic motor sport history and even Bernie vetoed the idea (http://www.independe...x-a7667906.html).

 

I would much rather see a second race in South America (probably in Argentina) or one in Africa (South Africa?). Perhaps in a few years after the Vietnamese have hosted some other events (a round of SuperFormula, WTCC etc.) you can start to seriously think about going there for a Grand Prix.

 

Edit:

And if there is a GP there can we please have it on a proper track not another boring street circuit or sterile Tilkedrome


Edited by RacingGreen, 07 October 2017 - 01:03.


#23 loki

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 01:32

Economically Africa and South America aren't growing at the rates they are in Asia.  Liberty is looking for emerging economies with consumers that are just starting to have disposable income and support that with ads/marketing to those consumers.  It isn't about motorsport heritage but rather finding markets to consume the content and be exposed to the sponsor marketing.  These won't be on new, multi million dollar circuits but in city centers.  Street races/festival/events and paid content are going to be a key in Liberty's market expansion.



#24 JacnGille

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 01:41

Good morning Vietnam! It’s 6:00 in the morning, what’s the O stand for? It stands for oh look at that F1 car!

 

 

It's wet! Damn Wet! So wet we're floatin boats down pit lane.

 

:cool: 



#25 V8 Fireworks

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 02:04

Good morning Vietnam! It’s 6:00 in the morning, what’s the O stand for? It stands for oh look at that F1 car!

 

 

It's wet! Damn Wet! So wet we're floatin boats down pit lane.

 

:cool: 

 

 

Vietnam is a great country and a GP there is most welcome.  When I was there, most Vietnamese could still only afford motorcycles... yet look at China.  20 years ago their roads were full of bicycles, yet now are full not even of motorcycles but of cars.  Capitalism & F1, they go hand in hand.  F1 chases the consumers with disposable income.   ;)

 

Notice how truly poor countries like Eritrea have no Grands Prix... Africa is conspicuously absent on the F1 calendar.  :cry:


Edited by V8 Fireworks, 07 October 2017 - 02:05.


#26 RacingGreen

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:01

Economically Africa and South America aren't growing at the rates they are in Asia.  Liberty is looking for emerging economies with consumers that are just starting to have disposable income and support that with ads/marketing to those consumers.  It isn't about motorsport heritage but rather finding markets to consume the content and be exposed to the sponsor marketing.  These won't be on new, multi million dollar circuits but in city centers.  Street races/festival/events and paid content are going to be a key in Liberty's market expansion.

 

I know on some level you are right because we keep hearing about Asian growth but Vietnam's per capita GDP is only 2,185 USD (2016). Who are these Vietnamese that have all this disposable income? Where is the Ferrari dealership? Granted the economy is growing very impressively at an average rate 27% (over the last 5 years) but let's not forget F1's Korean adventure. Korea has a per capita GDP (over twelve times as much) of 27,538 USD (2016) and over the same period experienced growth at an average rate 23% (also pretty good) couldn't afford a GP and cancelled it. Any expansion has to be sustainable it's bad for F1's image to go to a new country and the GP only last a couple of years.

 

As for street races just because Liberty call cities "iconic" doesn't mean the circuits themselves are interesting.  I know it's in many cases a cheaper option for F1 but it doesn't help motor-sport in general develop as it doesn't provide any permanent additional motor racing infrastructure.



#27 RandomG

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:12

Having more Asian races will build the interest of the countries in Asia that are actually interested in F1. Even if Vietnam may not have any established interest, Chinese and Japanese fans are probably more likely to tune in. Its building regional interest not just the specific country.

 

Big picture stuff. 



#28 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:32

I know on some level you are right because we keep hearing about Asian growth but Vietnam's per capita GDP is only 2,185 USD (2016). Who are these Vietnamese that have all this disposable income? Where is the Ferrari dealership? Granted the economy is growing very impressively at an average rate 27% (over the last 5 years) but let's not forget F1's Korean adventure. Korea has a per capita GDP (over twelve times as much) of 27,538 USD (2016) and over the same period experienced growth at an average rate 23% (also pretty good) couldn't afford a GP and cancelled it. Any expansion has to be sustainable it's bad for F1's image to go to a new country and the GP only last a couple of years.

 

As for street races just because Liberty call cities "iconic" doesn't mean the circuits themselves are interesting.  I know it's in many cases a cheaper option for F1 but it doesn't help motor-sport in general develop as it doesn't provide any permanent additional motor racing infrastructure.

Infrastructure? Naah lets have b/s street courses because it impresses the hangers on!

As a very cynical but genuine motorsport fan street course simply take away from proper pernemant circuits. It did that here in Adelaide for 30 years!



#29 F1matt

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:42

quality not quantity. More races doesn't make a better championship, going to the best tracks with the best fans will make the series better. All tracks should have to provide a business plan on how they can make their event work without government bale outs.

#30 Graveltrappen

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:16

It’s gonna be hot and wet, that’s good if you’re with a nice lady, but not if you’re in a Formula One Car

#31 Tsarwash

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:49

F1 doesn't race in front of empty grand stands in China. Just because the massive grandstand at the banked turn isn't open doesn't mean there's no spectators at the track. 

 

If the massive grandstand isn't open for the race. than at the very least F1 races in front of empty grandstand in China. 



#32 FirstnameLastname

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 08:21

Looks like Vietnam Grand Prix will be with us within 2 years.

https://www.motorspo...r-slot/3191592/

#33 Spillage

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 10:32

I'll believe it when I see it to be honest.

I've nothing against a race in Vietnam, but if there are something like 25 races on the calendar then we're all going to be saturated and pc. It'd probably be better to have some races alternating every other year than shove them all into one calendar.

#34 ViMaMo

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 10:39

It’s gonna be hot and wet, that’s good if you’re with a nice lady, but not if you’re in a Formula One Car


Bah, that's what seperates the fittest. Who last longer?

I'm talking about racing.

#35 potmotr

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 10:53

Great idea. Vietnam is an amazing country to visit. 

 

I see this as kind of like Thailand hosting MotoGP.

 

Most interesting thing will be how expensive the tickets are.

 

Having watched F1 in an almost completely empty Istanbul Park a few years back, I think making tickets affordable for locals is super important.



#36 ensign14

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 10:55

There used to be a rule that a track had to host a non-title F1 race, or event of similar stature, before being allowed to host a Grand Prix, to show that the venue was suitable.  I think the last such event was at Imola in 1979 as it was tabbed for the Italian GP 1980.

 

The first events for which it was dropped were probably the Las Vegas GP in 1981, which was held in a car park, and the Dallas GP in 1984, which that proved an amusing disaster, as the track broke up before qualifying.  The geniuses behind the calendar decided to host it in the summer, when the temps were in three figures.

 

If they brought that back, it would show who was really serious.  And it might have prevented some of the filth being foisted on the calendar.  Buddh, I'm looking at you.



#37 PayasYouRace

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 11:07

So we hold them hostage and force them to hold a GP no matter the current public indifference to F1?


You weren’t the only one to ask me this, but you have it backwards.

I never said countries should be forced to host Grands Prix. I said Grands Prix should be held in countries with the greatest contribution to world motorsport. It goes without saying that that’s selected from the pool of countries that are actually willing to and are expressing an interest.

#38 Pete_f1

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 11:28

Yes, Vietnam is a country, not just a war. I remember watching the Top Gear special and being in awe of the landscape.

Not sure about eating roast snake though.

#39 potmotr

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 11:58

Yes, Vietnam is a country, not just a war. I remember watching the Top Gear special and being in awe of the landscape.
 

 

Exactly.

 

Though if you want to know more about the war check out the Ken Burns Vietnam 10 part documentary on Netflix at the moment.

It's incredible, though no mention of the Grand Prix.



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#40 cpbell

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 12:19

But... the Korean Grand Prix worked out to be a thoroughly successful and well attended event that did great things for motorsport in Korea.

Didn’t it?

Yet, of course, when F1 did find an emerging economy that produced sizeable crowds, they made the fees so expensive that the authorities could no longer justify funding *coughMalaysiacough*.



#41 cpbell

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 12:22

Infrastructure? Naah lets have b/s street courses because it impresses the hangers on!

As a very cynical but genuine motorsport fan street course simply take away from proper pernemant circuits. It did that here in Adelaide for 30 years!

IMO, Liberty want to make F1 into a street circuit Championship.



#42 Talisman

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 14:56

You weren’t the only one to ask me this, but you have it backwards.

I never said countries should be forced to host Grands Prix. I said Grands Prix should be held in countries with the greatest contribution to world motorsport. It goes without saying that that’s selected from the pool of countries that are actually willing to and are expressing an interest.


That would be a tiny list, might as well cross off any chances of motorsport expanding beyond its current footprint. How would you define contribution? Would the Gulf states count since they have invested heavily over the years in certain teams and on their course but have never been able to get any drivers or technical suppliers close to entering?

Singapore and Malaysia are/were successful until the latter was killed off by sky high fees. Korea on the other hand was a failure by being placed in the middle of nowhere. India couldn’t sustain interest in a non-cricket sport. Shanghai like Singapore has lasted because the local authorities continue to sustain it. Each Asian project has succeeded or failed for different reasons. I think if done well Vietnam could flourish as a host, but they will need both a lot of advice from Liberty and local political backing and understanding for that to happen.

#43 johnmhinds

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 15:39

IMO, Liberty want to make F1 into a street circuit Championship.


Or their only option left now is these street circuits, they’ve run out of purpose built tracks that they can milk for 30-40 million a year. And nobody wants to repeat the huge mistakes and false promises of India and Korea.

Liberty have gone from claiming they had 40 places vying for a race to only saying they might have a race kinda near Hanoi in 2 years time.

#44 BRG

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 17:15

Or their only option left now is these street circuits, they’ve run out of purpose built tracks that they can milk for 30-40 million a year. And nobody wants to repeat the huge mistakes and false promises of India and Korea.

Liberty have gone from claiming they had 40 places vying for a race to only saying they might have a race kinda near Hanoi in 2 years time.

Good old Bernie, he knew when to bale out as the bubble burst.   Liberty offered a race to Miami fir free and they didn't take it, how much are they offering to pay Vietnam?



#45 Pete_f1

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 17:30

But... the Korean Grand Prix worked out to be a thoroughly successful and well attended event that did great things for motorsport in Korea.

Didn’t it?


It would have done, if it haddnt been built where the only other thing going on was shipbuilding. I never understood the last corner and pit entrance.

#46 AustinF1

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 17:49

There's no evidence to say even holding an F1 race will generate interest though.

 

I mean, how long has F1 been racing in China for now? Well over a decade. Yet there was a story this week, saying that in research done for Liberty Media, that F1 was the least popular in...China!

 

 

https://www.motorspo...esearch-961198/

 

It's not a good look for F1 to be racing in front of empty grand stands, no matter how large the country or "important" the market, in my view.

IDK about the U.S. having the 'fewest' fans, even if COTA has cut USGP reserved seating capacity by about half over the years to help reduce the number of said empty grandstands, down to around 40k from around 80k. That's a far cry from the Indy USGP days of 200k+ crowds on Sunday.

 

But we've definitely made our motorsport 'contributions' in more ways than one LOL. After the GP in a couple of weeks, the taxpayers of the State of Texas will have contributed in the neighborhood $200 Million so far to F1 by paying COTA's sanctioning fee for them for 7 years.


Edited by AustinF1, 08 October 2018 - 17:51.


#47 Nemo1965

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 18:14

Excuse me for the pun but...

 

Does Hanoi now have a Hilton?



#48 PayasYouRace

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 19:47

That would be a tiny list, might as well cross off any chances of motorsport expanding beyond its current footprint. How would you define contribution? Would the Gulf states count since they have invested heavily over the years in certain teams and on their course but have never been able to get any drivers or technical suppliers close to entering?

If I just quote myself when I laid down some criteria:

I really wish the formula one world championship would be held the countries that have and do contribute most to world motorsport.
If a new country wants to join the party they should bring something, such as having an internationally recognised national championship or having drivers and teams competing at international or world level.

Looking at the current calendar, it applies to most of it.

Australia: No problems. 4 world championships plus plenty of other international success, hosting equivalent races and producing top talent by 1985.
Bahrain: On of the weaker ones, basically just financial support. Hard to justify.
China: had held FIA GT races. Macau had returned to Chinese hands by 2004 too.
Azerbaijan: Another weaker one, but had at least held international GT races in Baku.
Spain: long history of GP racing from before WW2.
Monaco: A well established GP from well before the World Championship.
Canada: plenty of motor racing history at a high level prior to 1967.
France: They invented Grands Prix. Need I say more?
Austria: Not all that familiar with Austrian racing history, but I’d be surprised if they hadn’t done anything of note before 1964. At least a non-championship race had been held before then.
Great Britain: Long history of top level racing. Seaman, the Bentley Boys, Brooklands, etc.
Germany: Producers of GP machinery and drivers from the beginning.
Hungary: While the race was mainly political, to get F1 beyond the iron curtain, at least the country had the honour of producing the first Grand Prix winner. Hungarian Grands Prix had been held prior to WW2.
Belgium: Another with history pre-dating the world championship.
Italy: See France, Germany, Belgium, Spain, GB, etc.
Singapore: racing there dates back to the 1960s.
Russia: Russian motorsport tended to by quite insular but at least they held some WSR and DTM races before hosting a Grand Prix.
Japan: Had produced a Grand Prix winning constructor.
USA: another with a rich history. No need for further comment.
Mexico: Built on the success of the Rodriguez brothers, and non-championship events.
Brazil: International events prior to WW2
Abu Dhabi: See Bahrain.

So really, I’m hardly setting out impossible criteria to add new races to the calendar. You don’t need a Grand Prix to build up a motorsport culture. I firmly believe that a world championship should be hosted by those countries that bring the most to the world stage, not to the highest bidder.

#49 Talisman

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 20:04

If I just quote myself when I laid down some criteria:

Looking at the current calendar, it applies to most of it.

Australia: No problems. 4 world championships plus plenty of other international success, hosting equivalent races and producing top talent by 1985.
Bahrain: On of the weaker ones, basically just financial support. Hard to justify.
China: had held FIA GT races. Macau had returned to Chinese hands by 2004 too.
Azerbaijan: Another weaker one, but had at least held international GT races in Baku.
Spain: long history of GP racing from before WW2.
Monaco: A well established GP from well before the World Championship.
Canada: plenty of motor racing history at a high level prior to 1967.
France: They invented Grands Prix. Need I say more?
Austria: Not all that familiar with Austrian racing history, but I’d be surprised if they hadn’t done anything of note before 1964. At least a non-championship race had been held before then.
Great Britain: Long history of top level racing. Seaman, the Bentley Boys, Brooklands, etc.
Germany: Producers of GP machinery and drivers from the beginning.
Hungary: While the race was mainly political, to get F1 beyond the iron curtain, at least the country had the honour of producing the first Grand Prix winner. Hungarian Grands Prix had been held prior to WW2.
Belgium: Another with history pre-dating the world championship.
Italy: See France, Germany, Belgium, Spain, GB, etc.
Singapore: racing there dates back to the 1960s.
Russia: Russian motorsport tended to by quite insular but at least they held some WSR and DTM races before hosting a Grand Prix.
Japan: Had produced a Grand Prix winning constructor.
USA: another with a rich history. No need for further comment.
Mexico: Built on the success of the Rodriguez brothers, and non-championship events.
Brazil: International events prior to WW2
Abu Dhabi: See Bahrain.

So really, I’m hardly setting out impossible criteria to add new races to the calendar. You don’t need a Grand Prix to build up a motorsport culture. I firmly believe that a world championship should be hosted by those countries that bring the most to the world stage, not to the highest bidder.

 

So you agree with me.  All the ones with the strongest justification are traditional motorsport countries in Europe, the US and Japan or with a significant European based population such as those in South America.  I note that by restricting it to the current year you have left out many of the more debatable venues F1 has visited such as India or Korea too.

 

Unlike football which seems to have universal appeal motorsport doesn't spread easily, not helped these days by switching to pay to view TV coverage.  That is despite demand for cars skyrocketing globally.  A defensive viewpoint where one demands motorsport heritage (sorry, hosting one or two types of race of moderate popularity doesn't cut it for me) will simply result in F1 being more and more restricted in its footprint especially since the popularity of cars and motorsport in general decline in those traditional markets.

 

If F1 is to expand it simply has to enter new markets and nurture them.  This has to be balanced of course by the need to remain in touch with heritage countries and circuits.  Otherwise the sport will simply decline as its current fanbase dissipates.



#50 PayasYouRace

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 20:15

So you agree with me. All the ones with the strongest justification are traditional motorsport countries in Europe, the US and Japan or with a significant European based population such as those in South America. I note that by restricting it to the current year you have left out many of the more debatable venues F1 has visited such as India or Korea too.

Unlike football which seems to have universal appeal motorsport doesn't spread easily, not helped these days by switching to pay to view TV coverage. That is despite demand for cars skyrocketing globally. A defensive viewpoint where one demands motorsport heritage (sorry, hosting one or two types of race of moderate popularity doesn't cut it for me) will simply result in F1 being more and more restricted in its footprint especially since the popularity of cars and motorsport in general decline in those traditional markets.

If F1 is to expand it simply has to enter new markets and nurture them. This has to be balanced of course by the need to remain in touch with heritage countries and circuits. Otherwise the sport will simply decline as its current fanbase dissipates.

We don’t seem to agree entirely. I do not think F1 needs to be expanding into markets with no motorsport heritage. The calendar is already bloated enough, so if anything, it should focus on the countries that can justify it the most.

I chose this year because it was easier, rather than listing every single country ever to host the world championship. This year is a good sample of continuous history (GB, Italy, Germany), coming and going (Austria, Mexico) and no prior heritage.

The point is F1 doesn’t need to go to places with no heritage to expand, because it it’s not hard to find enough places with that heritage for a full season, and you don’t need a Grand Prix to build up that heritage, as most of the countries on the calendar have proved.

ETA: and of course, if you do look at places such as Turkey, Korea and India, the events didn’t last because they didn’t generate the interest. They just show that you build interest from the bottom up, not just from the top down.