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Sky to broadcast F1 exclusively in UK from 2019 [UPDATE: C4 highlights for 2019]


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#51 Jordan44

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:42

Hey, who remembers tuning into Red Button for free practice, only for some over-running tennis match to be shown instead? I'll agree Sky's pre-race stuff could be better (having to fit in ad breaks naturally leads to some of this, features have to fit each part and it's hard not to have presenters talking either side of the break) but on the whole paying for Sky with a dedicated channel is well worth it to the frustration that came from missing sessions at random like that.

GP2 and GP3 coverage, plus classic races, just serves to sweeten the deal.

 

It's nothing to with ad breaks. It's just they employ buffoons like Crofty and Herbert and their production team have ran out of ideas to make their coverage interesting so we just get the same drivel every week. The Sky coverage we got in 2012 was worlds apart from the nonsense we get now.



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#52 F1Champion

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:44

Over 12 million customers will have access to F1 highlights. If anything Sky's current F1 audience will grow substantially now they can show F1 outside of their subscription channel for free to normal Sky TV viewers in the form of highlights.

 

That's assuming that the other 12m customers are interested in F1. I know a whole bunch of people who have F1 access but couldn't care less to watch it. If anything all they are capturing is those people without access to the channel on Sky that watch the highlights on FTA. It's not really a sport in the UK that casual people enjoy much.

 

Over time the subscription will continue to rise as it is for football and I'd imagine less people pay for the channel and opt for the highlights instead.



#53 jonpollak

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:44

Don't say I didn't warn ya....

 

Jp


Edited by jonpollak, 23 March 2016 - 18:51.


#54 Seanspeed

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:45

This bothers me far more than any of the rule changes people are complaining about.  



#55 Risil

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:46

Also, is it the norm for TV contracts to be announced three years in advance?



#56 David Lightman

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:46

Terrible news for the teams too of course, how will they get big sponsors when the audience is decimated? And like others, I refuse to pay Sky for their coverage because I think it's terrible. A 'premium quality' service does not employ the likes of Croft, Lazenby and Herbert.


Edited by David Lightman, 23 March 2016 - 18:48.


#57 pRy

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:48

So what's the alternative? BBC didn't want it. ITV/Channel 4 we are unaware of how committed they would be and how much they were willing to pay. What is the sport to do? Give coverage away for free? If the Sky deal is such bad news then what was the viable alternative here?



#58 johnmhinds

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:49

Over 12 million customers will have access to F1 highlights. If anything Sky's current F1 audience will grow substantially now they can show F1 outside of their subscription channel for free to normal Sky TV viewers in the form of highlights.

 

So they may go up from 500,000 a race to 750,000? Wow....

 

Losing the 3million+ free to air viewers that BBC and Channel 4 were getting will kill off the UK fan base just like every other sport that has tried to move to the Pay-TV model.

 

The commercial rights holder will get its TV money in the short term but everyone else will be hurt by the drop in viewers.



#59 Fastcake

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:51

To crosspost from the other thread, F1 now follows the dangerous road to total irrelevance, past the burning husks of so many other sports that sold out to Sky.

 

Hey, who remembers tuning into Red Button for free practice, only for some over-running tennis match to be shown instead? I'll agree Sky's pre-race stuff could be better (having to fit in ad breaks naturally leads to some of this, features have to fit each part and it's hard not to have presenters talking either side of the break) but on the whole paying for Sky with a dedicated channel is well worth it to the frustration that came from missing sessions at random like that.

GP2 and GP3 coverage, plus classic races, just serves to sweeten the deal.

 

People said that about Cricket. "You can watch every ball!" Yeah, but it doesn't matter if the audience is down to five men and their dog.



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#60 Marklar

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:51

The irony....

 

http://www.telegraph...e-suicidal.html



#61 chunder27

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:51

Then the sport will lose countless viewers, Bernie has never cared about free to air, he only cares about money and for some UnGodly reason SKY think they will get all these viewers coming across to them to watch F1, that is NOT going to happen.

 

Simply put, it measn the end of me watching Formula 1.

 

And to be honest I ahve hardly watched the last couple of years anyway so I am not missing much



#62 JHSingo

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:51

Oh for ****'s sake.

 

I've never bothered subscribing to Sky, and won't be despite this. So, I'll either have to rely on streams, or (and is pretty likely, given the way things are going in F1 right now) end up losing interest in F1 completely.

 

:down:



#63 johnmhinds

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:52

So what's the alternative? BBC didn't want it. ITV/Channel 4 we are unaware of how committed they would be and how much they were willing to pay. What is the sport to do? Give coverage away for free? If the Sky deal is such bad news then what was the viable alternative here?

 

They could just lower what they are asking for so that they get the deals that give them the most viewers, instead of just hunting for short term profits.

 

Having a large fan base is worth so much more to the sport than the money that Pay-TV deals will bring them.



#64 F1Champion

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:53

The thing that I don't like is the hunger and thirst for the teams to be richer and have more money for development etc isn't coming from the teams but from fans. But fans couldn't care less about the budgets of the teams and don't get a say in the budgets either. The manufacturer teams want bragging rights over each other, and will spend £200/£300m to do so, which is fine if you want to finance your spending war via sponsorship and manufacturer contributions, but instead its coming from tv rights and subscriptions which ultimately come out of the pocket of the viewer. Manufacturers can trim back their investment at the expense of the fans and that is why the sport won't last. The sponsorship will dry up too and funding will fall back on tv rights. F1 is in a bubble - I mean employing 1000+ people to put 2 cars on the grid? Having multi-million multi-site factories? Football is the world's most popular sport and teams don't employ anywhere near that level, but F1 which is a niche sport will and that's nuts!


Edited by F1Champion, 23 March 2016 - 18:54.


#65 blackhand2010

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:53

So what's the alternative? BBC didn't want it. ITV/Channel 4 we are unaware of how committed they would be and how much they were willing to pay. What is the sport to do? Give coverage away for free? If the Sky deal is such bad news then what was the viable alternative here?

 

Ummmm, lower it's prices so FTA channels might be interested and able to afford it...?

 

Remember, unlike most sports, the inclusion of manufacturers means the teams themselves are trying to sell "product" to the audience. 

Tis a rare thing when the consumers have to pay the producers for the privilege of being marketed to...



#66 David Lightman

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:54

They could ditch TV completely and stream it directly themselves?



#67 w1Y

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:54

I watch it on sky bu Bernie wonders why support is dwindling.

Really really poor management of this sport

#68 P123

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:56

It's no surprise. It's the way most sport is heading but it is a short sighted money grab for F1.

#69 pRy

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:57

They could just lower what they are asking for so that they get the deals that give them the most viewers, instead of just hunting for short term profits.

 

Having a large fan base is worth so much more to the sport than the money that Pay-TV deals will bring them.

 

So why isn't Moto GP in trouble then? That's been off free to air in the UK for a year now. What's happened to that sport?

 

We don't know if the BBC even wanted F1 regardless of the price. F1 is a business. Bernie can't let the free to air channels dictate terms and then hope for the best when they examine their budgets each year.. hoping they won't pull out of their deals like the BBC did. Why does the BBC get a free pass in all of this? What they did was far more damaging to F1 coverage in this country than anything Sky has done.



#70 Doughnut King

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:59

Once Sky go it alone - Projected Average will be 1 million viewers.

 

That sounds very generous to me. The legacy HD deal already inflates Sky F1 viewing figures. If that gets removed, I foresee it falling.



#71 ConsiderAndGo

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 18:59

So what's the alternative? BBC didn't want it. ITV/Channel 4 we are unaware of how committed they would be and how much they were willing to pay. What is the sport to do? Give coverage away for free? If the Sky deal is such bad news then what was the viable alternative here?

 

And how do you know that Channel 4, or whoever, didn't say 'Yeah, I'm interested in bidding for the next set of broadcasting rights'? Sky are a sleazy organisation. I can totally imagine that whoever came up against them meant Sky pummeling another gazillion pounds into Eccelstone's pocket, just to seal the deal.

 

They had to share before - There was no way the big wigs were going to let that happen again.



#72 pacificquay

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:00

Good news.

If the sport gets back to a position where it is watched by people who are actually interested rather than by casual viewers it won't keep making changes to pander to the lowest common denominator

#73 blackhand2010

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:00

So why isn't Moto GP in trouble then? That's been off free to air in the UK for a year now. What's happened to that sport?

 

Except the MotoGP highlights are on FTA via ITV4, without the need for a Sky or BT box...



#74 Disgrace

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:01

Relax guys. At least boxing didn't sink into total obscurity and irrelevance after it shifted away from free-to-air...



#75 Amin

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:02

This is absolutely horrible news. After many decades of watching F1, my Grandmother will be completely shut out.



#76 JHSingo

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:03

Good news.

If the sport gets back to a position where it is watched by people who are actually interested rather than by casual viewers it won't keep making changes to pander to the lowest common denominator

 

Good news?

 

Viewing figures will drop. No ifs or buts about it. It's guaranteed.

At a time when F1 is hemorrhaging viewing figures right now, this is not the way to go at all. Particularly in a country where F1 is so important - particularly with many of the teams based here, etc.



#77 chunder27

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:03

MotoGP was never that popular on BBC, and is a far, far smaller sport fanwise than F1, most other sports only get intermittent high viewers like the majors in tennis and golf and the Ryder Cup, the Tour in cycling is a month, the World Cup every 4 years and Olympics

 

F1 is regular, it is as close to football in terms of reglarity, it pulls in nothng like the viewers, but it is regular.

 

MotoGP can only dream of those viewing figures, and that sport is run, administered and exsists solely really for Spain, the rest are interlopers.  They ahve one personality, once he goes the sport sill suffer immeasurably.

 

It is on BT sport but deosnt get massive figures, and is insanely cheap, they paid 10 mill for 4 years!!

 

All you can do as fans is move on, don't buckle, don't pay for it, this is blackmail, nothing more, for a sport that is offering you little in entertainment and even less in appeal, you watch it because you know no better.

 

Or alternatively, keep handing over your hard earned for a sport that thrives on the rich and gives nothing to the average man, keep paying your insane prices to watch events live, you have been for years and you will continue as you are the prime reason why Bernie thinks he can get away with this garbage. You cant help yourselves.

Stick together and prove him wrong, I dare you.



#78 TheRacingElf

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:03

I can't get angry about F1 anymore, F1 is unsavable,  I've already given up on F1 and just laugh at their incompetence.



#79 pRy

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:04

This is absolutely horrible news. After many decades of watching F1, my Grandmother will be completely shut out.

 

Buy her a Sky box. £10 setup and £20 a month. She will have lots of new channels and the highlights.



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#80 pacificquay

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:04

The viewing figures don't bother me.

As long as enough people watch for the sport to exist and it is broadcast live then I am happy.

Why does it matter how many other people watch it?

#81 pdac

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:06

:eek:  A million less?

 

This is probably why it's going to Sky. The viewers are dropping anyway. Bernie lost the BBC (who can pull in the audience) because he wasn't prepared to reduce the cost (enough). His priority is getting in the money and he obviously doesn't mind if that means losing the audience (and, hence, the future of F1).



#82 RedOne

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:07

Days after messing up qaulifying he makes the biggest mistake of them all. Will be surprised to see if there is anything even left by 2019 with this idiot in charge..

Edited by RedOne, 23 March 2016 - 19:07.


#83 Burai

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:07

Good news.

If the sport gets back to a position where it is watched by people who are actually interested rather than by casual viewers it won't keep making changes to pander to the lowest common denominator


All they have to do is fill the void left by the sponsors and manufacturers leaving because there's no-one watching any more. I'm sure Bernie will be more than happy to make up the difference.

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

#84 pacificquay

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:10

Cloth will be cut accordingly. They didn't have much in the way of sponsors or manufacturers back in the day

#85 Dalin80

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:10

This makes no difference, they lost the fans when many of the races went PPV. There is already nothing but distaste and ill will for the sport, I work for a company that manufactures some motorsports parts and noone in the workshop who used to live and breath F1 even bothered watching last weekend.



#86 ConsiderAndGo

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:11

The viewing figures don't bother me.

As long as enough people watch for the sport to exist and it is broadcast live then I am happy.

Why does it matter how many other people watch it?

 

What do sponsors do? They pay insurmountable amounts of money to put their brand on these cars.

 

Viewing figures will drop dramatically.

 

Sponsors will stop paying for the 'privilege'

 

Smaller teams will either go bust, or cut their loses.

 

Less competition.

 

Less need to watch F1.

 

Circuits, because fans will stop turning up, will not pay Bernie what he deems a requirement.

 

Ferrari will say 'f*** this'.

 

The end.


Edited by ConsiderAndGo, 23 March 2016 - 19:12.


#87 Gorma

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:11

I remember when I was young almost everyone watched F1. Now it has been behind a paywall for years and I'm the only one I know who watches it. Well there is one person at work.

The sport will eventually die because there will be no new fans.

#88 Doughnut King

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:12

Cloth will be cut accordingly. They didn't have much in the way of sponsors or manufacturers back in the day

 

Accounting for inflation how much more money does it require to run an F1 today compared to 1975?



#89 Quickshifter

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:13

What is it with F1 and shooting itself in it's foot. Been an avid formula one for nearly two decades it sounds ridiculous that the official f1 app charges for providing live sector times during sessions.

 

I am not from UK but this monopoly is not good for f1 especially with the sport struggling with dwindling audiences globally. Sky indulges  indulges in cheap tabloidesque digs, the pit lane reporters who cannot differentiate a front wing from a rear wing, the commentators one of whom has an agenda to advance every race, the coverage having so many bloopers as far as technical information is concerned. 

 

What is most painful for me is that the loyal fans like majority of the people on this forum who will support the sport irrespective of the **** ups  like the recent qualifying fiasco, the technical regulations which are so far removed from real racing are being alienated.  Yes formula one needs to cater to a wider audience and bring new people in but the way to do it is to be much more internet friendly, have an option of streaming on the internet for which people can pay and sign up, be much more friendly towards social media and encourage a far more closer interactions between drivers and the fans on race weekends. It is a pity how a couple of commentators on Sky themselves do not understand the technical details. how can you expect them to explain in simple words the workings of a modern formula 1 car, the strategies involved and the ever changing rules of the sport to people who are new to the sport.


Edited by Quickshifter, 23 March 2016 - 19:17.


#90 mclarensmps

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:14

Relax guys. At least boxing didn't sink into total obscurity and irrelevance after it shifted away from free-to-air...

 

I'm unsure of making this parallel because UFC has taken over boxing's mantle, and that is a pay per view event



#91 JHSingo

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:14

Why does it matter how many other people watch it?

 

Did you seriously just ask that?

For one thing, it'll find making sponsors an even harder job than it already is - particularly in the UK. What sponsor wants to be associated with a sport that is losing viewers, and will be entirely behind a paywall?

 

With the possible exception of football, when a sport in this country goes behind a paywall, it loses relevance. Fewer people will know about it, or be watching. Fewer people will attend the British Grand Prix, and who knows? Maybe that'll mean it drops off the calendar in a few years.

 

To those already with Sky, it probably doesn't seem like the end of the world. But otherwise it is a very dark day for F1 in this country.


Edited by JHSingo, 23 March 2016 - 19:15.


#92 Araqiel

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:14

It's nothing to with ad breaks. It's just they employ buffoons like Crofty and Herbert and their production team have ran out of ideas to make their coverage interesting so we just get the same drivel every week. The Sky coverage we got in 2012 was worlds apart from the nonsense we get now.


Of course it's possible with ad breaks, just harder - especially if you insist on splitting the pre-race into three pre-determined half-hour segments. The way Sky have it atm essentially means any feature has to go in the second of these three segments, with a break either side of and in-between said segment. That limits it to ten minutes max, generally a lot less, and leads to more talking-head time overall. It breaks up the flow of the whole thing, which I strongly believe plays a bigger part in many people not enjoying it as much than they realise. Yes Herbert and Hill droning on isn't brilliant, but a more open format would only help matters.

As for Croft I don't share the same disdain so many here seem to - yes he's a bit shouty in the race but he's better than Edwards, Legard or (ITV-era) Allen, and him and Davidson are great in practice sessions, even if they do sometimes get off on a pointless tangent.

Apart from the ever-more restrictive format though (which I imagine is for the convenience of those recording it - who FFW through the ads and therefore shouldn't be given priority over live viewers IMO), I can't say I remember it being markedly better in 2012 than it is now.

#93 pacificquay

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:15

Accounting for inflation how much more money does it require to run an F1 today compared to 1975?


But with an exit of the big budgets they will get back to a cheaper form of it.

Look at IndyCar or BTCC or whatever

#94 Jamiednm

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:16

The viewing figures don't bother me.

As long as enough people watch for the sport to exist and it is broadcast live then I am happy.

Why does it matter how many other people watch it?

 

Shortsighted view.

 

Viewing figures will drop by millions. So that is at least hundreds of thousands of opportunities to inspire children to get in to go karting or to aspire to be an F1 engineer. Lewis Hamilton grew up watching F1 for free on TV, Adrian Newey no doubt did the same thing, alongside every other British F1 driver, mechanic, engineer and team boss. F1 employs a lot of highly-skilled people in the UK, companies like McLaren and Williams are industry leaders in some high-tech sectors, and with most of the teams based here, the government gets a nice big tax dividend from F1. It's obvious that by getting less and less exposure, all these aspects I mentioned will suffer over time.

 

As less people watch it over time, it becomes less likely new people will come to watch it because there will be less conversations about it, less buzz and generally less exposure. It will be seen as an extremely niche sport, not something that could hook you because it's on BBC 1 on a Sunday afternoon with millions watching live.


Edited by Jamiednm, 23 March 2016 - 19:19.


#95 Clatter

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:17

Over 12 million customers will have access to F1 highlights. If anything Sky's current F1 audience will grow substantially now they can show F1 outside of their subscription channel for free to normal Sky TV viewers in the form of highlights.

It may grow Sky's audience, but it will still be a reduced audience for F1. The current highlights and half the live races are available to far more than 12 million, so the potential audience will shrink if the current viewing methods are maintained.

#96 stewie

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:17

Unbelievable how F1 manages to consistently shoot itself in the foot.

#97 Lotus53B

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:17

Here's a thought - Sky has prescence in all or most European countries...how long till they have exclusive rights in all of them?



#98 Burai

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:18

Accounting for inflation how much more money does it require to run an F1 today compared to 1975?


A Cosworth DFV would be about £125,000 in today's money.

#99 SophieB

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:19

I guess the sport got tired of shooting itself in the foot all the time so it's announced these plans to try shooting itself in the head.

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#100 Doughnut King

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 19:19

But with an exit of the big budgets they will get back to a cheaper form of it.

Look at IndyCar or BTCC or whatever

 

Didn't IndyCar and the BTCC go though some pretty tough years though after the budgets evaporated?