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W Series 2019


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#351 Rinehart

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 13:40

 

Also could you point me to the racing series that has been set up to offer free racing to any man who applies and makes it into the last 20 of the selection process?

 

Err, you might have heard of it, F1? 

 

There are what, roughly 500 professional racing drivers around the world of which probably 475 are men and your complaining it's unfair that 25 of them are women, even though 20 of them are in their own little series worlds away from F1 where you think they belong. What is unfair about that? 



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#352 Rinehart

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 13:46

I do not think there is sexism in terms of drivers in motorsport. That is dependant purely on talent, and to a lesser extent on marketing and country.  If a woman was as good as Stroll came from Japan she would get picked out by Marko, drive the Red Bull ladder and be in an RB before you knew it. Sadly that has never happened, so there is apparently sexism?

 

 

 

I don't think anyone on here is saying any different to your first paragraph. I'm certainly not. The rest of your post though...

 

I don't agree, I think that is hypothetical and purely conjecture. I think it is the promotors/circuits/broadcasters who want a women, I don't think the teams, certainly not Red Bull, are as bothered. 



#353 7MGTEsup

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 14:59

Err, you might have heard of it, F1? 

 

There are what, roughly 500 professional racing drivers around the world of which probably 475 are men and your complaining it's unfair that 25 of them are women, even though 20 of them are in their own little series worlds away from F1 where you think they belong. What is unfair about that? 

 

I'm not sure F1 is open to all comers who turn up with their helmet and overalls but I may be wrong.

 

Where did I complain that there are 25 professional female racing drivers? Where did I say they belong away from F1?



#354 Rinehart

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 17:17

I'm not sure F1 is open to all comers who turn up with their helmet and overalls but I may be wrong.

 

I answered the question you asked.



#355 JavierDeVivre

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 17:31

Err, you might have heard of it, F1? 

 

There are what, roughly 500 professional racing drivers around the world of which probably 475 are men and your complaining it's unfair that 25 of them are women, even though 20 of them are in their own little series worlds away from F1 where you think they belong. What is unfair about that? 

In which case, someone better inform all of the drivers who have coughed up millions in order to buy their seats, because they, or at least their sponsors, will be due large refunds...



#356 JavierDeVivre

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 17:51

You have got to be joking, your post itself disproves your theory. There have to be 100 posts here proving it. And that's before you actually work in motorsport and discover first hand the cultural bias ingrained within it. Assuming you don't, some of these brainfarts have been published, from the likes of Sterling Moss and Bernie Ecclestone to David Reynolds and Richard Petty...

How does it disprove itself? The W entrants are in a privileged position of not having to pay to compete or having to find sponsors to pay for them to compete. No other racing series offers this, but apparently this gives them equal treatment...

 

This is a privilege that is not afforded to most drivers who seek to go racing, especially those who compete outside of the top series.

 

My statement was not sexist, it was factual. Perhaps you should try reading, and understanding, people's posts instead of jumping to conclusions. 



#357 JavierDeVivre

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 18:05

I don't agree, I think that is hypothetical and purely conjecture. I think it is the promotors/circuits/broadcasters who want a women, I don't think the teams, certainly not Red Bull, are as bothered. 

Pot meet kettle. I guess conjecture on your part is acceptable, but not from others.

 

The junior programmes, such as Red Bull's, are just one of the reasons why W will fail to achieve it's claimed goals, because it is outside of how these programmes operate.



#358 Sterzo

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 21:46

I wonder where the topic is.



#359 jonpollak

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 21:53

What did Bernie say?
‘If there was a Black Jewish Woman available .. I’d get her in a car tomorrow ‘ ?

Or something like that?
Jp

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#360 ensign14

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 22:11

Also Sir Humphrey Appleby, suggesting that the perfect quango member would be a disabled black Welsh lesbian.

 

This was at the Autosport show, dunno whether it's the actual proposed W Series car or a dummy mock-up. 

 

46911670032_d768fe03e0_b.jpg

 

32022725527_02f03c9524_b.jpg

 

 

I was fairly antagonistic to the series as I think it's totally the wrong way to go.   Now I am thinking that it is still the wrong way to go, but it might give someone the burst of publicity needed to get her in a proper drive in a proper formula.  A better thing would have been to use the same money to sponsor five promising drivers in F3/GP3/&c in a good team, but that would mean a) less publicity, and b) bad choices or a bad season would kill the idea off instantly.  At least this way someone is bound to win.

 

The worry is that it might be too easy for someone so she doesn't get the challenge she would get elsewhere, so is a step behind where she should be had she been in a "proper" series.



#361 jonpollak

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 22:37

Yeah I see what you mean but ‘proper’ drivers have a ‘proper’gig already.
Jp

#362 ensign14

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 23:23

It seems much harder these days to get one though.  Because of the trustafarians taking over and even manipulating team mates.



#363 E1pix

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 05:40

As always, this sub-forum makes me ashamed of my testosterone.

#364 sgtkate

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:32

I don't agree, I think that is hypothetical and purely conjecture. I think it is the promotors/circuits/broadcasters who want a women, I don't think the teams, certainly not Red Bull, are as bothered. 

Sorry yes, I perhaps should have highlighted the bit I really agreed with, that there is no specific sexism against women in motorsport. I believe if a women had the skill and financial backing to get a place in F1 she would get it.



#365 sgtkate

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:40

As always, this sub-forum makes me ashamed of my testosterone.

Don't be! The majority in here seem to be fairly supportive of the idea of getting more women in motorsport, we just differ over the best and fairest way to do that. There's only a few in here who seem genuinely *upset* at the idea that women could compete on equal terms.

 

Getting back to the thread which understandably has become a bit of a topic mash-up, they have a website now that actually looks professional and decent (compare to another fun thread Rich Energy!) https://wseries.com/

However, there really isn't much detail about the events. It appears to be running as a support race for DTM? I think that might be a double-edged sword. Yes it means they likely won't have empty stadiums to drive around as lots of the fans will watch the earlier races but it also means they are restricted to running mostly just 1 country. I'd have thought it would have been more media savvy to go to as many countries as possible, combine it with the drivers visiting schools in the host countries etc to really promote it, perhaps even offer free tickets and VIP passes to local schools as well. We need to ignite the interest in younger boys and girls and I really hope they don't miss this chance.


Edited by sgtkate, 07 February 2019 - 09:46.


#366 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:55

I was fairly antagonistic to the series as I think it's totally the wrong way to go.   Now I am thinking that it is still the wrong way to go, but it might give someone the burst of publicity needed to get her in a proper drive in a proper formula.  A better thing would have been to use the same money to sponsor five promising drivers in F3/GP3/&c in a good team, but that would mean a) less publicity, and b) bad choices or a bad season would kill the idea off instantly.  At least this way someone is bound to win.

 

The worry is that it might be too easy for someone so she doesn't get the challenge she would get elsewhere, so is a step behind where she should be had she been in a "proper" series.

 

I think that having teams in the lower formulas that are open to female drives and payed for by this money would be a far better idea also. Competing in a closed formula is not a good idea, you should always seek out the highest level of competition if you want to improve.



#367 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:58

I answered the question you asked.

 

You gave an answer, but not one that made sense or had any truth to it as JavierDeVivre went on to point out.

 

#368 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:00

As always, this sub-forum makes me ashamed of my testosterone.

 

Looks like the media has been successful in convincing you that men and to the point white men are the route of all evil.



#369 Rinehart

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:26

How does it disprove itself? The W entrants are in a privileged position of not having to pay to compete or having to find sponsors to pay for them to compete. No other racing series offers this, but apparently this gives them equal treatment...

 

This is a privilege that is not afforded to most drivers who seek to go racing, especially those who compete outside of the top series.

 

My statement was not sexist, it was factual. Perhaps you should try reading, and understanding, people's posts instead of jumping to conclusions. 

 

:stoned:  How is it unfair? The backers of W-Series have decided that there is a business case to funding 20 girls to go racing, they weren't alternatively going to pay for 20 men, so it was this or nothing. It's like saying that its unfair that L'Oreal don't make lipstick for men or some Zara stores don't have a men's section. It's quite pathetic imo. So how is this unfair to men, how have men lost out? Are you saying you can't go racing for free in the same way? Because you can. All you need to do is pay for your own karting and junior formula just like these girls have done, show enough talent, just like these girls have done, and there is a chance that a sponsor, management company or academy will take you on. 

 

Edit; I've just thought of a better example. Last weekend my daughter was invited to a Birthday party where 8 class friends, all girls, went horse-riding. I take it you feel this is unfair on boys? 



#370 Rinehart

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:32

Looks like the media has been successful in convincing you that men and to the point white men are the route of all evil.

Oh please. Anyone who can be so antagonised that 20 girls out of a global population of 7bn people get to do a few hours of motor racing (in an irrelevant backwater series that hardly anyone is going to see) are clearly the ones feeling threatened. 



#371 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:52

Oh please. Anyone who can be so antagonised that 20 girls out of a global population of 7bn people get to do a few hours of motor racing (in an irrelevant backwater series that hardly anyone is going to see) are clearly the ones feeling threatened. 

 

I'm not threatened at all just think they are going about it in the wrong way. Please point out where I have ever said women should not be allowed to compete???? I have said they can compete with men directly and the money would be better spent on teams in the lower formulas so they are competing with the peers that they will be racing with rather than isolating them in a separate group.

 

You are confusing disagreeing with they way they are going about this with being threatened that a woman one day will be a world champion racing driver.



#372 Requiem84

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 10:56

I'm not threatened at all just think they are going about it in the wrong way. Please point out where I have ever said women should not be allowed to compete???? I have said they can compete with men directly and the money would be better spent on teams in the lower formulas so they are competing with the peers that they will be racing with rather than isolating them in a separate group.

 

You are confusing disagreeing with they way they are going about this with being threatened that a woman one day will be a world champion racing driver.

 

Formula W already resulted in more media coverage for Female racers than most independent racing girls. Why not let Formula W play out and see what it does? 

 

Eventually the best of Formula W could be given a seat in Formula 3 or F2 or something like that where they compete against men. It's a tool to create more awareness about female racing, more interest from girls around the world. 

 

I think we should just let them play it out and make some conclusions in a few years time. 



#373 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 11:21

Formula W already resulted in more media coverage for Female racers than most independent racing girls. Why not let Formula W play out and see what it does? 

 

Eventually the best of Formula W could be given a seat in Formula 3 or F2 or something like that where they compete against men. It's a tool to create more awareness about female racing, more interest from girls around the world. 

 

I think we should just let them play it out and make some conclusions in a few years time. 

 

It's going to play out even though I think it's a step in the wrong direction, I will admit I'm wrong if the higher placed women (1st through 5th) go on to bigger and better things in the long run.


Edited by 7MGTEsup, 07 February 2019 - 11:30.


#374 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 11:26

Oh please. Anyone who can be so antagonised that 20 girls out of a global population of 7bn people get to do a few hours of motor racing (in an irrelevant backwater series that hardly anyone is going to see) are clearly the ones feeling threatened. 

 

If the purpose of this is to attract women to racing how is this going to help? Surely it needs to be put out there for everyone to see? It needs to be on a major TV channel/midia with lots of advertising if it is to attract young girls to motor racing.



#375 paulstevens56

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 12:12

Women already get vastly more media coverage for their ability level compared to men, they start out with an advantage just being women. That enables thme to access different sponsors and companies who fall over themselves to sponsor a female competing.  It doesn;t always happen that way, but in most cases at the higher levels of racing it does.

 

Surely anyone can see that.

 

Danica got more coverage being an utterly average NASCAR driver than anyone else at her level did.



#376 Rinehart

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:04

I'm not threatened at all just think they are going about it in the wrong way. Please point out where I have ever said women should not be allowed to compete???? I have said they can compete with men directly and the money would be better spent on teams in the lower formulas so they are competing with the peers that they will be racing with rather than isolating them in a separate group.

 

You are confusing disagreeing with they way they are going about this with being threatened that a woman one day will be a world champion racing driver.

 

You keep saying it is "unfair" and that is what I am arguing against. If you mean it is "the wrong way", then we are probably somewhat agreed on that, with differences. But, the thing people forget is that there needs to be a return on investment and for all the great suggestions that more money should be invested in grassroots motorsport for women, or even, grassroots for all, nobody as far as I can see has yet worked out how to do that in a way that is profitable and without a philanthropist stepping forwards to make motorsport far more accessible to more kids, I don't think W-Series should be too harshly criticised for doing something, less than ideal, but possible. Something that will in all probability increase the interest of motorsport in women AND won't affect the potential career of a single man. Where my cynicism of W-Series lies is more in the sense that its probably a sham promise, it's not really about the winner going on to compete in motorsport against men, it's going to be the same field of drivers in year 2 and in reality this is their career now. That would be bad, because the next potential F1 woman is going to get shunted into this and not reach their potential. That is the opposite of fair and the opposite of privilege in my book. 



#377 Rinehart

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:09

If the purpose of this is to attract women to racing how is this going to help? Surely it needs to be put out there for everyone to see? It needs to be on a major TV channel/midia with lots of advertising if it is to attract young girls to motor racing.

 

Well I used that phrase to undermine the notion that this is an amazing opportunity! 

 

In reality, again, we need to consider the context that this is a start up business, they probably can't afford to run the series on international circuits on prime time tv yet - it's going to take some time to build brand, audience and revenue - we shouldn't really judge it too soon. I think the success rests on the amount of attention they can build around the stars of the series... but then, the winner will go off to race in a next tier series... so they say... and that would mean a lot of the fan base they'd build, migrating away with this star... it would appear to me that it would be in W Series interests to KEEP the leading contenders IN the series... 



#378 Rinehart

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:14

Women already get vastly more media coverage for their ability level compared to men, they start out with an advantage just being women. That enables thme to access different sponsors and companies who fall over themselves to sponsor a female competing.  It doesn;t always happen that way, but in most cases at the higher levels of racing it does.

 

Surely anyone can see that.

 

Danica got more coverage being an utterly average NASCAR driver than anyone else at her level did.

 

You're contradicting yourself. For a girl to become good enough that she's worth sponsoring (as you say, at the higher levels) she needs to have invested a lot of money through years of developing her talent in the early years through karting and junior formula. Nobody as far as I can see, is sponsoring a girl, before she's turned a wheel. Can you give an example of where "just being a woman" is an advantage initially? Is it an advantage to be a daughter rather than a son when asking her father if she can be taken go-karting that first time?...



#379 statman

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:16

This was at the Autosport show, dunno whether it's the actual proposed W Series car or a dummy mock-up. 

 

46911670032_d768fe03e0_b.jpg

 

32022725527_02f03c9524_b.jpg

 

 

 

hey look, a post that is on-topic! Thanks.



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#380 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:35

You keep saying it is "unfair" and that is what I am arguing against. If you mean it is "the wrong way", then we are probably somewhat agreed on that, with differences. But, the thing people forget is that there needs to be a return on investment and for all the great suggestions that more money should be invested in grassroots motorsport for women, or even, grassroots for all, nobody as far as I can see has yet worked out how to do that in a way that is profitable and without a philanthropist stepping forwards to make motorsport far more accessible to more kids, I don't think W-Series should be too harshly criticised for doing something, less than ideal, but possible. Something that will in all probability increase the interest of motorsport in women AND won't affect the potential career of a single man. Where my cynicism of W-Series lies is more in the sense that its probably a sham promise, it's not really about the winner going on to compete in motorsport against men, it's going to be the same field of drivers in year 2 and in reality this is their career now. That would be bad, because the next potential F1 woman is going to get shunted into this and not reach their potential. That is the opposite of fair and the opposite of privilege in my book. 

 

I think you must be confusing me with someone else as I'm not sure I have used the term unfair.



#381 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:39

hey look, a post that is on-topic! Thanks.

 

Technically it's not on topic as this thread is about drivers not the car  :p



#382 7MGTEsup

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 13:50

Well I used that phrase to undermine the notion that this is an amazing opportunity! 

 

In reality, again, we need to consider the context that this is a start up business, they probably can't afford to run the series on international circuits on prime time tv yet - it's going to take some time to build brand, audience and revenue - we shouldn't really judge it too soon. I think the success rests on the amount of attention they can build around the stars of the series... but then, the winner will go off to race in a next tier series... so they say... and that would mean a lot of the fan base they'd build, migrating away with this star... it would appear to me that it would be in W Series interests to KEEP the leading contenders IN the series... 

 

You raise in interesting point (or one came to me after reading your comment) does the winning driver have to move on with their $500K or can they compete again? If there is one woman who comes out head and shoulders above the rest what would stop her from just pocketing the $500k and repeating the feat again the following year?



#383 Rinehart

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 14:06

You raise in interesting point (or one came to me after reading your comment) does the winning driver have to move on with their $500K or can they compete again? If there is one woman who comes out head and shoulders above the rest what would stop her from just pocketing the $500k and repeating the feat again the following year?

 

As its by invite and selection, I am sure W Series have the right not to invite/select anyone they don't want.

If there was a run away winner, surely they would have to back that driver in a next tier series as this would validate their stated aims. 

But as I said, if that star driver represents 50% of their audience pull... they're gonna have a moral dilemma! 



#384 E1pix

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 15:01

Thanks for the thoughtful posts, Rinehart.

#385 E1pix

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 17:39

Women already get vastly more media coverage for their ability level compared to men, they start out with an advantage just being women. That enables thme to access different sponsors and companies who fall over themselves to sponsor a female competing.  It doesn;t always happen that way, but in most cases at the higher levels of racing it does.
 
Surely anyone can see that.
 
Danica got more coverage being an utterly average NASCAR driver than anyone else at her level did.

Women attract sponsors for being rare commodities in the sport, and to fill huge marketing voids. Once more women compete, this will gradually change.

I see this as similar to why Billy Monger will attract sponsors, and surely nobody would have a justifiable reason to complain once he does.

#386 Sterzo

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 17:48

W Series – which drivers could be in?

 

There are 28 drivers shortlisted for 18 places. In the words of the thread title – which drivers could be in? There are many I know little about, but no doubt others can enlighten us. These four, I think, are highly likely to make the cut:

 

1. Alice Powell, who won a club Formula Renault championship and finshed second in a club F3 championship, both in the UK. Might be rusty, but she would be my favourite overall.

2. Jamie Chadwick, UK British GT4 champion when 17, won a (reversed grid) British F3 race last year, and will be familiar with the car. Like Powell, she is a fighter.

3. Sarah Moore was UK Ginetta Junior champion, but funds ran out and her single seater efforts were fragmented. I’m sure she has high potential.

4. Beitske Visser, claimed race wins in ADAC Formel Masters and wins in GT4 racing. Have never seen her, but would expect her to adapt given her experience.
 

As a wild card to join the above: Sabre Cook from the USA is young and inexperienced, but charged through a CoTA F4 race gaining more places than anyone.
 

Here are three I’ve seen racing who might struggle to make it:

 

1. Esmee Hawkey. I'm tempted to cheer for her as she’s local to me, but her low positions in Ginetta Juniors and British Porsches suggest she might be in the bottom half..
2. Jessica Hawkins – has won in Minis, but was disappointing in UK single seaters

3. Gosia Rdest – er, no. She raced in F4 in the UK, apparently, though I didn’t notice, and has no decent results elsewhere.


Edited by Sterzo, 07 February 2019 - 17:50.


#387 paulstevens56

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 18:16

You get to a certain level on talent alone.

Someone like Danica was good enough in junior series and others to get into Indycar. She did well, won a race.

 

But to say she got to that level on talent alone, like a guy would, is wrong. She got better drives as a woman, more sponsors as a woman, more airtime, more media. 

 

That was my point.

 

And in NASCAR she was proven to be out of her depth.  That is no bad thing, but shows that talent ALONE did not get her to where she was in my opinion.

 

There can even be this criticism levelled at Mouton, would Audi have taken a French driver who had not done much before that if his name was Alain Mouton?  I doubt it, Audi were years ahead of the game and for them it worked a treat, she was good enough to compete, win, push for championships.  Would she have done it without a Quattro?  No, but neither would have Mikkola or Blomqvist.  For Rohrl to beat them in an Ascona for me deserves more credit, but Michele is by far and away the standard bearer, she drive a big, heavy car with no aids in tough events, learned to drive it, to complete and won rallies. That was enough.



#388 NotAPineapple

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 19:20

The more I think about it the more I like this series because it will settle a lot of arguments.

If the winner goes on to win championships outside of the W series then we can close the argument of women's ability to race competitively against men.

Likewise if the winner can't replicate the success outside of W...

#389 ensign14

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 20:00


3. Gosia Rdest – er, no. She raced in F4 in the UK, apparently, though I didn’t notice, and has no decent results elsewhere.

 

I think she's the only one I've met.  I'm surprised she made this far, because she's more a GT racer. 



#390 Sterzo

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 22:30

I think she's the only one I've met.  I'm surprised she made this far, because she's more a GT racer. 

And she could undoubtedly thrash me in almost anything, but I can't see her troubling the Powells and Chadwicks.



#391 messy

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Posted 07 February 2019 - 22:45

I kinda like the idea and stuff, the selection process, the possibility of it giving someone like Jamie Chadwick or Beitske Visser a career leg-up, but I think it's dawned on me now that this actual series is likely to be a bit sh*t.

Hailee Deegan, there's the big name to watch in the next few years IMO. Teenager, sponsor's dream come true, seems to be prodigiously talented, may make a NASCAR Cup start as early as this season. Probably - and here's the problem with W Series - wouldn't look twice at this series. I'm sort of surprised Chadwick has, honestly. British F3 race winner and (probably more impressively) British GT GT4 champion when she didn't look remotely old enough to drive anything let alone a bloody Aston Martin Vantage. I find her impressive. Give her a drive!!

#392 sgtkate

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 08:47

The more I think about it the more I like this series because it will settle a lot of arguments.

If the winner goes on to win championships outside of the W series then we can close the argument of women's ability to race competitively against men.

Likewise if the winner can't replicate the success outside of W...

But we ALREADY have women who compete at the top levels of various motorsport alongside the men. Just because there aren't that many in single-seaters doesn't mean the point hasn't been proven.



#393 phrank

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 09:14

But we ALREADY have women who compete at the top levels of various motorsport alongside the men. Just because there aren't that many in single-seaters doesn't mean the point hasn't been proven.

Think we first have to define what we consider a 'top level'



#394 MrMonaco

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:07

Think we first have to define what we consider a 'top level'

If Indycar, WEC and Sprint Cup is not considered to be top level then I don't know what else should be.

 

Also Sir Humphrey Appleby, suggesting that the perfect quango member would be a disabled black Welsh lesbian..

You mean Syrian?


Edited by MrMonaco, 08 February 2019 - 10:09.


#395 Rinehart

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:38

W Series – which drivers could be in?

 

There are 28 drivers shortlisted for 18 places. In the words of the thread title – which drivers could be in? There are many I know little about, but no doubt others can enlighten us. These four, I think, are highly likely to make the cut:

 

1. Alice Powell, who won a club Formula Renault championship and finshed second in a club F3 championship, both in the UK. Might be rusty, but she would be my favourite overall.

2. Jamie Chadwick, UK British GT4 champion when 17, won a (reversed grid) British F3 race last year, and will be familiar with the car. Like Powell, she is a fighter.

3. Sarah Moore was UK Ginetta Junior champion, but funds ran out and her single seater efforts were fragmented. I’m sure she has high potential.

4. Beitske Visser, claimed race wins in ADAC Formel Masters and wins in GT4 racing. Have never seen her, but would expect her to adapt given her experience.
 

As a wild card to join the above: Sabre Cook from the USA is young and inexperienced, but charged through a CoTA F4 race gaining more places than anyone.
 

Here are three I’ve seen racing who might struggle to make it:

 

1. Esmee Hawkey. I'm tempted to cheer for her as she’s local to me, but her low positions in Ginetta Juniors and British Porsches suggest she might be in the bottom half..
2. Jessica Hawkins – has won in Minis, but was disappointing in UK single seaters

3. Gosia Rdest – er, no. She raced in F4 in the UK, apparently, though I didn’t notice, and has no decent results elsewhere.

 

From what I know, I think Jamie Chadwick is going to walk it. She has by far the most recent, relevant and credible experience and success - and she's consistent. I also think her career trajectory to date has been proper, having won a lot in karting and won the Ginetta scholarship. She also has good people around her. Of all the entrants, she is the only one who I was surprised entered this, I thought she may be "above it" so to speak, but $500k for a few hours work can surely help her in future I suppose. I think her presence here somewhat undermines the claim that any half decent woman would be in a privileged position and a magnet for sponsorship/support... I think it's a big risk for her, if she doesn't win... That all said there are some runners that I have little knowledge of and of course there could be one or two with bags of God given talent that just need the platform to show it... but it doesn't look like there is going to be a lot of testing/seat time so that would be difficult. For anyone who has driven a downforce car before, they would know they take a bit of getting used to, downforce feels very different to mechanical grip. JC is one of a few drivers who have a big advantage there. I just hope there isn't any twist to the plot such as reverse grids or something, becasue racing through this field is going to be fraught with danger (and I'm not being sexist, I'm referring to experience)... Those are my thoughts, probably completely wrong! 



#396 sgtkate

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:53

From what I know, I think Jamie Chadwick is going to walk it. She has by far the most recent, relevant and credible experience and success - and she's consistent. I also think her career trajectory to date has been proper, having won a lot in karting and won the Ginetta scholarship. She also has good people around her. Of all the entrants, she is the only one who I was surprised entered this, I thought she may be "above it" so to speak, but $500k for a few hours work can surely help her in future I suppose. I think her presence here somewhat undermines the claim that any half decent woman would be in a privileged position and a magnet for sponsorship/support... I think it's a big risk for her, if she doesn't win... That all said there are some runners that I have little knowledge of and of course there could be one or two with bags of God given talent that just need the platform to show it... but it doesn't look like there is going to be a lot of testing/seat time so that would be difficult. For anyone who has driven a downforce car before, they would know they take a bit of getting used to, downforce feels very different to mechanical grip. JC is one of a few drivers who have a big advantage there. I just hope there isn't any twist to the plot such as reverse grids or something, becasue racing through this field is going to be fraught with danger (and I'm not being sexist, I'm referring to experience)... Those are my thoughts, probably completely wrong! 

On paper she should walk it I agree. Also a bit surprised to see her there, but perhaps as you say the chance to get a big chunk of money is worth it for her. I don't know the costs involved in GP2 but I'd suggest half a million quid would go a long way to securing a seat which would give her a bump up in class.



#397 Rinehart

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 11:36

If she did win and move up a category, as well as the $500k prize, I would think W-Series would have to invest something in her, and as the inaugural winner of the W-Series, surely then she could attract a bit more sponsorship. She'd also have the likes of David Coulthard in her corner who can surely open doors. Would have thought scraping together $1m would not be beyond her. 



#398 statman

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 14:20

Jamie Chadwick is also doing well in the MRF challenge this winter:

 

"The MRF Challenge kicked off in Dubai in November, with Jamie picking up three second place finishes. Following her dominant performance in Bahrain with three decisive wins, she now lies 2nd in the points standings, with just 18 points separating her and experienced Belgian single-seater racer, Max Defourney, as they head into the final rounds in India.
 
This highly acclaimed winter championship has attracted several top drivers in the past, including current European F3 champion Mick Schumacher (son of Formula 1 legend Michael), IndyCar racer Pietro Fittipaldi, and design guru Adrian Newey’s son, Harrison, among others."


#399 Kalmake

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 15:11

Heads up the above is not journalism, it's from her website.

 

While Max Defourney has more single-seater experience, he is same age as her.

 

"Highly acclaimed" MRF Challenge typically has couple good drivers who have done well in Europe and are just a bit lost during winter. Then a few who can't make it in Europe but have rich family. The rest are weak local drivers.

 

Not to say winning there is easy. She should do well in W-series too.



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#400 NotAPineapple

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 18:51

But we ALREADY have women who compete at the top levels of various motorsport alongside the men. Just because there aren't that many in single-seaters doesn't mean the point hasn't been proven.


Not merely competing I mean winning at the highest levels. That would then validate the opionion that women can race as good as men.

The winner of the W series will be pretty objectively the best female racer that there is. Logic dictates that if women are as good as men at racing then the winner of the W series should be F1 world champion material given time.

With all the doors that the W series opens up, any failure from the series winner to then proceed onto and have championship success in the top levels of motorsport would likewise pretty objectively prove that women are not at the same level as men.