Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

3D printed brake calliper


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 5,593 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 27 December 2018 - 19:54

Ignore the first 22s of this post, it's just a fat bloke car.

 

 

laser sintered titanium brake calliper. Max or yield or ultimate stress is 1250 N mm-2. The organic shape is the result of some topology optimisation, like Optistruct.

 

And then they got it a bit hot

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=hPkY8nBWxoU

 

Not very informative



Advertisement

#2 Tenmantaylor

Tenmantaylor
  • Member

  • 12,112 posts
  • Joined: July 01

Posted 28 December 2018 - 13:31

Really cool. Is this part on the standard Chiron or is this a separate project?

 

The topology optimisation is in fact a creation of what is known as 'generative design'. This is when the simulated forces of the part in operation (or testing) are used to inform the shape of the design directly hence making it as strong, light and economical as possible by only position material where the stresses and forces are resisted most effectively. Simulation has been used for decades to optimise strength of parts and inform designs but GD is new, it uses AI powered automatic modelling technique to create the topology and volume of the part. I find it fascinating and beautiful that the resulting shapes are often extremely organic, resembling complex bone structures with pretty much no straight lines or constant radius arcs that often prevail in mechanical engineering due to our limited control of topology when engineering something and our desire to control numbers and parameters. This design technique goes hand in hand with 3D printing as many of the complex structures cannot be made with traditional techniques, at least not economically.



#3 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 5,593 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 28 December 2018 - 18:49

"GD is new"

 

yes, it was introduced more recently than the steam engine. I first used it in ~2005. The idea of reinforcing the red bits and getting rid of the blue bits is older than that.

 

Agree, it has come into its own with 3D printing. Of course now all you need to know is what the loads are!

 

I think by AI you probably mean a genetic algorithm, I wrote that in Matlab to optimise a ladder frame chassis a couple of years later after playing around in Optistruct. At the time commercial structural optimisers didn't use beam elements, they do now. Basically - here's the hardpoints that need to be connected. Here are the loads at those points (I may have just used torsional stiffness). Here are the available section sizes. Use the best combination of section sizes to get a light stiff structure. This was for a 55 Tbird, it was quite interesting how hard it was to practically improve on the efficiency of the original design (stiffness/mass), the main mod I made was to add a X brace at the kick-up for the rear axle.



#4 Fat Boy

Fat Boy
  • Member

  • 2,156 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 30 December 2018 - 02:30

It's a shame they can't use some of the MMC materials that were used in the late 90's/early 2000's.



#5 mariner

mariner
  • Member

  • 1,775 posts
  • Joined: January 07

Posted 30 December 2018 - 18:32

Is 2.9kg a good.low number for a caliper of this strength?



#6 Bloggsworth

Bloggsworth
  • Member

  • 8,453 posts
  • Joined: April 07

Posted 31 December 2018 - 09:39

Good thing that Veron owners can afford flunkies to keep the things clean...



#7 Fatgadget

Fatgadget
  • Member

  • 5,281 posts
  • Joined: March 06

Posted 31 December 2018 - 16:18

Quality control?



#8 gruntguru

gruntguru
  • Member

  • 6,650 posts
  • Joined: January 09

Posted 01 January 2019 - 00:15

Good thing that Veron owners can afford flunkies to keep the things clean...

They don't do many miles either.



#9 Lee Nicolle

Lee Nicolle
  • Member

  • 9,634 posts
  • Joined: July 08

Posted 04 January 2019 - 00:24

Ignore the first 22s of this post, it's just a fat bloke car.

 

 

laser sintered titanium brake calliper. Max or yield or ultimate stress is 1250 N mm-2. The organic shape is the result of some topology optimisation, like Optistruct.

 

And then they got it a bit hot

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=hPkY8nBWxoU

 

Not very informative

Yeah right, it comes out polished with pads in it.

Though not made in two pieces with through bolts. That is the major advantage to me. And possibly a disadvantage too as well. Though owners will expect probably 5k for a relpacement one if it fails. eg piston freezing in the bore. The distinct lack of use for these cars probably makes this happen more than every day use.

I saw a You Tube clip of a 6 piston done CNC, though as usual in two halves. 



#10 kikiturbo2

kikiturbo2
  • Member

  • 816 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 06 January 2019 - 09:44

Single piece calipers made by the usual method of CNC machining are nothing new... I have some myself... not cheap but nothing like 3d printed titanium calipers..