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Mystery Alfa Romeo photo


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#1 scroggzilla

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 02:19

I happened across the following photo on Twitter (photographer unknown, but it looks like the work of Rudi Mailander or, perhaps, Jean Sejnost) of this Alfa Romeo 6c2500 SS.  Google image search revealed no result, and subsequent dives into various archives found no matches in the entry lists for the Mille Miglia, Monte Carlo Rally, or the Coppa d'Oro delle Dolomiti.  The lack of a plaque eliminates the Coupe des Alpes and Liege-Rome-Liege.  And the 6c2500 SS coupe wasn't introduced until 1947.  So, I leave it to the Nostalgia Forum hive mind for answers.  Any help that you can provide regarding the event and drivers is greatly appreciated.  Thanks.

 

big-70186878e6.jpg



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#2 Ray Bell

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 03:10

A hillclimb, perhaps?



#3 proviz

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 07:15

The scenery looks a lot like Passo di Gavia. Isn't there something like a rally plate on the right of the nose?


Edited by proviz, 29 January 2019 - 09:22.


#4 uechtel

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 08:08

Landscape and stones could fit well to one of the Austrian or Yougoslavian Alpine Rallyes, like for example here , but I could not find a match for the number.



#5 Parkesi

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 08:30

I was sure it must have been the Coppa d`Oro delle Dolomiti but after checking all the entry lists it`s not...

The highest start number ever was #186 (Fiat 1500/1947).

But there is a picture (page 65/1950) in the excellent book "Polvere & Gloria" by Cancellieri/de Agostini (2000/Nada) of

an Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 and a similar car plate in the same spot.

Clearly the typical small Italian licence plate, NOT a rallye plate.

Just a very tiny info.



#6 proviz

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 09:24

"Clearly the typical small Italian licence plate, NOT a rallye plate."

Sorry, my mistake - saying left as looking at the photo - I meant higher up the nose on the RIGHT side, as looking through the windscreen.

#7 Tim Murray

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 09:36

I think that’s the number 256 again, as on the left-hand door.

#8 proviz

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 10:25

True, no rally plate in sight....



#9 scroggzilla

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 22:54

One of my Facebook cohorts found the original source of the image, with a possible solution to the who/where/when.

 

http://www.classic-r...Eyb0zuUV_6OVzLQ

 

From the listing:

 

"The car was sold back in 1948 to the famous rally driver Eugenio Lubich of Triestre (Italy), who raced it very successfully in competition for the first years of its life. See the above attached picture. Mr. Lubich raced with great success with the most greatest Alfa, Ferrari, Maserati, Lancia and other uniques italian cars of all times, like Alfa 6C, Maserati A6GCS, Ferrari 250 Monza, Ferrari 250 TdF, etc…

This is part of the score achieved by Mr Lubich with this vehicle:

17.09.1950 Vittorio Veneto- Cansiglio: 4. Classificato categoria  GT

17.06.1951 Trento-Bondone: 2. Classificato categoria  GT

24.06.1951 Coppa del Pasubio (VI):4. Classificato categoria GT

08.07.1954 Bolzano- Mendola: 4. Classificato categoria GT

23-26.08.1951 Stella Alpina : 3. Classificato categoria GT

02.09 1951 Vittorio Veneto-Cansiglio

23.09.1951 Trieste-Opicina 3. Classificato categoria GT

30.09.1551 Chiusaforte-Selle Nevea (UD): 3. Classificato categoria GT

22.03.1952 corsa sulle Torricelle (VR) 4. Classificato categoria GT

I don't have a copy of Martin Pfundner's Alpine Trials and Rallies to verify my hunch, but I'm thinking it's the 1951 Stella Alpina.



#10 Rupertlt1

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Posted 30 January 2019 - 15:27

A look at La Stampa archivio comes up with the following:

 

Trieste-Opicina 1950

Eugenio Lubich "primo nella classe oltre 1100 cmc. su Aprilia"

 

Stella Alpina 1950

Lubich, "Turismo oltre 1100" 3rd Lubisch, Aprilia

 

Stella Alpina 1951

Eugenio Lubich, Lancia Aprilia 1500, 1st "gruppo Lancia-Aprilia 1500"

 

Mille Miglia 1952

Finished 82nd, Lubich/Lubich, Lancia Aurelia B21 (racingsportscars.com)

 

Bologna Raticosa 1954

Lubich, Lancia Aurelia

 

Stella Alpina 1954

competed

 

L'Aosta-Gran San Bernardo 1955

Lubich, Porsche 1500

 

Bologna-San Luca 1956

6th: Lubich, Maserati 2000 GT

 

Mille Miglia 1957

Eugenio Lubich/Luigi Villotti Ferrari 250 GT LWB Scaglietti '0597 GT' (Revs)

 

So far no evidence that Eugenio Lubich ever competed in an Alfa Romeo:

 

http://www.racingspo...o-Lubich-I.html

 

See also Mariano Lubich:

 

http://www.racingspo...o-Lubich-I.html

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 30 January 2019 - 23:50.


#11 Rupertlt1

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 17:00

Still worrying away at this #256 Alfa.

"Giro automobilistico" 1954

Gruppo vetture serie speciale:

1. Luigi Taramazzo/Gerino (Alfa Romeo 1900 SS) 2.38'31"1/5

 

Also ran:
Dalla Favera/Parmigiani (Alfa Romeo SS)
Valenzano/Sposetti (Alfa Romeo 2500), but were they in a Lancia Aurelia 2500?

Palanga/Ravina (Alfa Romeo 2500)

 

Other entrants: Behra, Gendebien, Musso 

 

Held in September/October, so could be snowy in the passes? Number of entrants?

Final stage: Merano to Monza, via Turin, Sestriere.

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 14 February 2019 - 14:45.


#12 Rupertlt1

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 21:05

The highest number I can find on the Stella Alpina in 1952 is this #236 Jaguar:

(Could this be Jean Herteaux? See: https://forums.autos...rts-car-races/)

 

https://library.revs...ion=p17257coll1

 

Note this rally ran without an identifying plate on the front.

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 02 February 2019 - 21:47.


#13 scroggzilla

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 13:15

I ran into Alfa Ronny (who some here may recognize from the AlfaBB forums) on FB.  He stated that the photo was taken at the 1951 Trento Bondone hillclimb.  I haven't yet located any additional information to corroborate his statement.



#14 Doug Nye

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 23:24

Hmmmm - it really doesn't look like Trento-Bondone to me...

 

Much more like the Dolomites - or even the upper reaches of the Grossglockner, come to that...

 

DCN



#15 proviz

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 08:20

Yes, really cannot fit it in the Trento-Bondone stretch. None of the scenery there looks like this, as far as I can remember. This seems higher up too.



#16 Doug Nye

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 22:15

Much higher - as in "above the tree line..."

 

DCN



#17 kayemod

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 23:51

Hmmmm - it really doesn't look like Trento-Bondone to me...

 

Much more like the Dolomites - or even the upper reaches of the Grossglockner, come to that...

 

DCN

 

I don't think the Großglockner  would be a candidate, I've seen photos of the road's upper reaches pre WW2, and it didn't have a gravel surface then, rather the upper hairpins at least were surfaced with something like cobbles, though with flattish topped stones, not the domed ones that were common in the UK at that time. Not sure about the straight bits between bends back then, but remember they had hillclimbs that were run for vehicles includeing Auto Unions, with drivers like Bergmeister Hans Stuck. Imagine racing one of those on a gravel surface...

 

Fairly certain that it would have been mostly tarmac by the early 50s, though cobbles may have remained on higher hairpin bends.



#18 uechtel

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:08

Can it be something like Aosta - San Bernardino?

 

https://www.google.d...iact=mrc&uact=8


Edited by uechtel, 11 February 2019 - 10:09.


#19 ensign14

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:50

At the expense of stating the obvious, the number looks to be painted in the Mille Miglia hand-painted style.  I assume the MM never went so high, but does that indicate either that the pic is in Italy, or is of a car not racing but still wearing its warpaint?



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#20 Allan Lupton

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:12

At the expense of stating the obvious, the number looks to be painted in the Mille Miglia hand-painted style.  I assume the MM never went so high, but does that indicate either that the pic is in Italy, or is of a car not racing but still wearing its warpaint?

Hand-painted numbers were normal in those days, I'd say. What other sort was available?



#21 ensign14

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:37

Well, there were the fablon templates that were common in British racing at the time, and without those you could paint the numbers on yourself.

 

But the only place I've seen that particular handpainting is on MIlle Miglia cars.



#22 Allan Lupton

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:48

Well, there were the fablon templates that were common in British racing at the time, and without those you could paint the numbers on yourself.

I don't remember sticky-back plastic being available before about 1960 and also don't remember people using templates when painting comp. numbers. Doesn't mean I'm right, but I do remember the number painter being a vital member of the organising team of any race meeting.



#23 Rupertlt1

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 13:57

1949 Mille Miglia went through la Cisa Pass

1950 Futa, Raticosa

1951 included Firenze > Bologna

1952 six hundred entries

1953 Futa, Raticosa

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 11 February 2019 - 14:07.


#24 proviz

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 14:07

None of those go near the tree line.



#25 Rupertlt1

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 06:13

Can it be something like Aosta - San Bernardino?

 

https://www.google.d...iact=mrc&uact=8

 

Aosta-Gran San Bernardino Hill Climb

1949

#68 Franco Rol, Turin, (Alfa Romeo 2500); #82 Vicentini (Alfa Romeo 2500) - is he Emilio Vicentini?

 

Highest race number:

1949 #108

-

1951 #100

1952 #172

1953 #170

1954 #180

 

(Source: La Stampa.)

 

Franco Rol:
 

https://www.motorspo...vers/franco-rol

 

1949: Mille Miglia, Alfa Romeo 2500, 3rd overall

 

It is not the 1954 Giro automobilistico della Sicilia as we see a number 256 Alfa Romeo in this film at 1:07, but not the right type!

 

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 14 February 2019 - 15:13.


#26 E1pix

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 14:52

I happened across the following photo on Twitter (photographer unknown, but it looks like the work of Rudi Mailander or, perhaps, Jean Sejnost) of this Alfa Romeo 6c2500 SS.  Google image search revealed no result, and subsequent dives into various archives found no matches in the entry lists for the Mille Miglia, Monte Carlo Rally, or the Coppa d'Oro delle Dolomiti.  The lack of a plaque eliminates the Coupe des Alpes and Liege-Rome-Liege.  And the 6c2500 SS coupe wasn't introduced until 1947.  So, I leave it to the Nostalgia Forum hive mind for answers.  Any help that you can provide regarding the event and drivers is greatly appreciated.  Thanks.
 
big-70186878e6.jpg

Got to thinking -- which is rare, so you might jump on it... ;-)

If you go to www.TinEye.com and enter this photo, it may well pull up its original source. Worth a try.

#27 scroggzilla

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 22:45

No soap, E1pix