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#101 Vitesse2

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 18:31

Cecil Clement Bianchi's exact date of birth was May 23rd 1886.



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#102 Tim Murray

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 18:50

There is then a mystery because, according to Rose, Bianchi drove a 96hp car in the Circuit des Ardennes, yet the photographs posted by Doug Nye and Robert Dick look like 72hp cars. I don’t know whether Rose is wrong in this or the big car was modified.

There are several photos of the 96 hp racers in Profile Publication 43 on the horizontal-engined Wolseleys, written by Anthony Bird in 1966 with considerable input from Cecil Bianchi himself. One shows Cecil at the 1905 Gordon Bennett trials (from Bianchi’s own collection). Another is of C S Rolls at the same event. Neither car is fitted with the ‘beetle’ nose. I wonder if perhaps the ‘beetle’ nose was found to be unsatisfactory during the 1904 Gordon Bennett race and discarded for subsequent events.

#103 Tim Murray

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 18:59

Cecil Clement Bianchi's exact date of birth was May 23rd 1886.


Thanks Richard. So he would have been around 18 years 2 months old at the 1904 Circuit des Ardennes, run on 25th July. Younger, therefore, than any F1 driver other than Max Verstappen.

#104 bradbury west

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 19:21

What excellent contributions, Tim and Richard/Vitesse. And what a superb contribution from Roger Clark, properly researched and sourced, and all from a simple observation about the perceived mechanical architecture of an old racing car.
I have said it before, but that is the sort of thing this place is supposed to be for and about, not worrying or moaning about Andrew Frankel's writing or driving style, or the purpose or perceived contribution of the latest additions to the staff of a well known magazine, oft discussed here.
Exits left, soap box under arm, often glad to be a 72 year old anachronism.
Roger Lund

As an aside, I always like the idea of a different engine layout, contrary to its peers. I always admired the engineering ingenuity of that Scot, Mr Anderson and his pre WW2 Specials, one of which had his self built flat 8 made up of 2 Humber/Hillman, - not checked- 4 pots on a common crank, along with his own self levelling suspension design.

#105 Roger Clark

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 19:51

There are several photos of the 96 hp racers in Profile Publication 43 on the horizontal-engined Wolseleys, written by Anthony Bird in 1966 with considerable input from Cecil Bianchi himself. One shows Cecil at the 1905 Gordon Bennett trials (from Bianchi’s own collection). Another is of C S Rolls at the same event. Neither car is fitted with the ‘beetle’ nose. I wonder if perhaps the ‘beetle’ nose was found to be unsatisfactory during the 1904 Gordon Bennett race and discarded for subsequent events.

I think Montagu, in his description of the 1904 GB race, gives us the answer. Jarrott’s 96hp car merged from scrutineering with only one mudguard- there was a maximum weight limit. It also lost the nose cowling, though Montagu says this was probably due to weather and not the scales. Whatever the reason, it appears that the 96hp raced without the cowling in 1904.


Edited by Roger Clark, 03 May 2019 - 22:25.


#106 Roger Clark

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 21:24

Charles Jarrott (Ten Years of Motors and Motor Racing) says that Bianchi was his riding mechanic on three occasions: 1903 Paris-Madrid and the Gordon Bennett races of 1903 and 1904. From the date of birth given by Vitesse2, we can see that Paris-Madrid was the day after his 17th birthday.

He had an adventurous time, apart from the work that was always necessary to keep a car running in those days. In the 1903 GB race Jarrott crashed when the steering failed. The car rolled over; Jarrott was thrown clear but Bianchi, who was strapped in, was trapped underneath the car, with the hot exhaust on his chest. Jarrott had to cut him free and left the heavy car so that Bianchi could be freed. In the 1904 GB race, Bianchi was hit by a broken driving chain. Later the governor failed and he had to control engine speed during cornering by switching on and off. A fuel feed pipe failed and Bianchi had pump to maintain pressure. This was in addition to the mechanic’s usual duties, including lubrication and warning the driver of approaching rivals.

Jarrott was obviously impressed by Bianchi and they moved together from De Dietrich to Wolseley. Jarrott retired from racing after the 1904 GB, after which Bianchi took the wheel.

#107 Tim Murray

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 03:46

In the 1903 GB race Jarrott crashed when the steering failed. The car rolled over; Jarrott was thrown clear but Bianchi, who was strapped in, was trapped underneath the car, with the hot exhaust on his chest. Jarrott had to cut him free and left the heavy car so that Bianchi could be freed.


After Jarrott helped rescue Bianchi he himself passed out. When he came to, he found himself covered by a sheet, believed dead:

When I came to, I wondered if I was dead. I could see sunshine and nothing else. With the hand I could move, I tried to scratch away the blur before my eyes, and found it was a sheet. I called out to Bianchi and to my relief he replied. I then asked him the somewhat superfluous question as to whether he was alive. He replied in a faint voice that he was alive but that he felt very bad.



#108 Odseybod

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 10:00

So the 17-year-old Bianchi was involved in a high-speed crash, lightly crushed and par-grilled under a volatile racing car until he can be dragged clear, then when questioned a bit later mentions that he feels rather below-par.

 

And we thought the Snowflake was a fairly new phenomenon ...



#109 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 10:16

So the 17-year-old Bianchi was involved in a high-speed crash, lightly crushed and par-grilled under a volatile racing car until he can be dragged clear, then when questioned a bit later mentions that he feels rather below-par.

 

And we thought the Snowflake was a fairly new phenomenon ...

'Tis but a scratch!

 

Black_Knight_Holy_Grail.png



#110 robert dick

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 12:52

Wolseley in The Automotor Journal, April 1904:
automotjour04a.jpg
automotjour04b.jpg
automotjour04c.jpg
automotjour04d.jpg

and March 1905:
automotjour05a.jpg
automotjour05b.jpg


Seems that Bianchi was moustached when these 1905 images were taken.
I don't know if this was his new look for the 1905 season so that I'm not sure whether the driver at the wheel of the Wolseley during the weight control in Bastogne (photos page 2) was Cecil Bianchi or Sidney Girling (who was always clean-shaven).
 



#111 Doug Nye

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 13:03

Interesting point.  Was Girling as youthful-looking as Bianchi could have been?  Or was the young man in my Branger photograph one of the drivers at all?  

 

DCN



#112 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 14:16

If I've found the right chap - I'm not 100% certain though - he was Sidney Samuel Girling, son of a manufacturer of artificial stone, born in Maidstone, Kent in about 1886. He's on the 1911 census as a motor engineer and emigrated to Canada in 1912 - as apparently, at some point, did much of the family, including his parents. On the 1921 Canadian census as a machinist in a motor shop. Died in British Columbia on December 3rd 1982, aged 96, so 1886 or the last few days of 1885 look favourite for his birth.

 

Apart from one described as a 'carman', whose first name is spelled with a Y rather than an I, he looks like the only one with any motor trade connection on the 1911 census.



#113 ReWind

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 14:46

Could well be the right one, Richard, because in 1911 a certain Sidney Girling brought a three-wheeled Girling automobile to Australia which was designed by his brother Albert. (Source).
And it seems Sidney Samuel Girling had a brother named Albert Henry Godfrey Girling who obviously was the inventor of Girling brakes (1881 – 1971).
 
EDIT: For confirmation a biography of Bert Girling (Source)

Albert Henry Godfrey Girling, known as Bert, was born on October 26, 1881 in Suffolk, England, and was the eldest son of George Godfrey Girling and Ellen Elizabeth Mills. He was trained as a carpenter in his father's business. He then became interested in mechanics and trained as a mechanical engineer. When his family immigrated to Saanich in about 1910, Albert remained in England. He joined the Army Service Corps in England in 1916, and was sent to France as an engineer in an aircraft station. Albert finished the War with the rank of Staff Sergeant. His friend Col. Thomas Order Lees tried to get him a commission and a transfer but this was in 1918 and the war ended. He served in the trenches and was wounded when a piece of shrapnel went through one side of his face and out of the other. Fortunately it did not do any lasting damage except for a scar. Albert is best known as the inventor of the Girling braking system. He died on December 19, 1971 in Ditchingham, Suffolk, England. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll.

Saanich is located in British Columbia.


Edited by ReWind, 04 May 2019 - 14:56.


#114 ReWind

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 15:17

Sidney Girling was born on 06 January 1886.
(Source)



#115 cpbell

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 16:17

Ensign14 told us here about an article on Cecil Bianchi by William Court which appeared in a September 1968 issue of Speedworld International magazine. At that time Bianchi was reported to be 82 years old and still living near Wolverhampton. Thus he must have been born in 1885 or 1886, so could have been no more than nineteen years old at the time of Doug’s photo.

ETA: According to this page Bianchi was born in London in 1886 and died in 1970. Thus he could have been no more than eighteen, maybe only seventeen, in the photo. I had no idea he was that young. :eek:

Makes me think that those who argued that Max Verstappen wasn't old enough to compete in Formula 1 at the age of 17 were even less justified in their view than I originally thought... :cool:



#116 cpbell

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 16:25

So the 17-year-old Bianchi was involved in a high-speed crash, lightly crushed and par-grilled under a volatile racing car until he can be dragged clear, then when questioned a bit later mentions that he feels rather below-par.

 

And we thought the Snowflake was a fairly new phenomenon ...

Thay made them resilient in them days... :rotfl:



#117 cpbell

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 16:33

Could well be the right one, Richard, because in 1911 a certain Sidney Girling brought a three-wheeled Girling automobile to Australia which was designed by his brother Albert. (Source).
And it seems Sidney Samuel Girling had a brother named Albert Henry Godfrey Girling who obviously was the inventor of Girling brakes (1881 – 1971).
 
EDIT: For confirmation a biography of Bert Girling (Source)

Saanich is located in British Columbia.

Addendum to the link posted above - Ditchingham is on the Norfolk bank of the River Waveney (he says as a proud South Norfolkman).



#118 alansart

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 16:52

Here's another - from the 1904 Circuit des Ardennes race, centred upon Bastogne - future scene of the desperate WW2 siege during the 1944 Battle of the Bulge. The railway station and its contemporary yard became the focal centre of race week - its weighbridge was used in scrutineering and the yard served in effect as the race paddock.

 

Here's what I have always rated as one of the most striking looking cars of the period - the Wolseley - driven by Cecil Bianchi.  Bastogne Station, then...

 

GPL-BRANGER-2-CECIL-BIANCHI-WOLSELEY-190

 

(Branger GP Library photo)

 

...and now...

 

Screenshot-2019-05-02-at-22-45-17.jpg

 

DCN

A bit more blending..........

46983790164_542e410055_b.jpgBastogne by Alan Raine, on Flickr


Edited by alansart, 04 May 2019 - 16:55.


#119 robert dick

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 16:58

For comparison - Girling in 1904:
girling04c.jpg
girling04b.jpg
girling04a.jpg
 



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#120 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 16:58

Addendum to the link posted above - Ditchingham is on the Norfolk bank of the River Waveney (he says as a proud South Norfolkman).

Although its postal address is Ditchingham, Nr Bungay, Suffolk. Which is presumably how the confusion arose. Even though its postcode is actually NR35 2 (Norwich). :drunk:

 

https://www.postoffi...584/ditchingham



#121 alansart

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 17:02

Something a little bit more modern.

33895916318_acd1576cf9_b.jpgRouen 1970 by Alan Raine, on Flickr



#122 Geoff E

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 18:36

Apart from one described as a 'carman', whose first name is spelled with a Y rather than an I, he looks like the only one with any motor trade connection on the 1911 census.

 

A carman had nothing to do with the motor trade.  He was a delivery driver (possibly employed by a railway), the equivalent of a "white van man".



#123 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 19:11

A carman had nothing to do with the motor trade.  He was a delivery driver (possibly employed by a railway), the equivalent of a "white van man".

Although he might have driven a motor lorry ...  ;)



#124 Roger Clark

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 20:24

A little more about Bianchi. He is mentioned three times in Boddy’s Brooklands History, all pre-1914 and all in connection with Crossley cars. In the 1920s he was General Manager of Crossley. In the 50s and 60 he was pictured several times in the VSCC Bulletin, particularly as a judge in the Concours at Maddresfield. His death was reported in the Spring 1970 Bulletin. He was described as a wonderful man, an honorary member of the Club and a living legend.

#125 Geoff E

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 20:39

Cecil Clement Bianchi's exact date of birth was May 23rd 1886.

 

Birth registered as Cecilio Clemente Bianchi in Hackney district.  1901 census shows his father to have been an Artist.



#126 Tim Murray

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 21:06

According to an article on the Bean Car Club site, Bianchi left Crossleys to join Bean as works manager in March 1929, and it was apparently his report on Bean cars’ shortcomings that led to car production ceasing later that year.

Another article on that website is about George Eyston’s Thunderbolt, which was built by Beans Industries Ltd with Bianchi apparently playing a significant role:

... and the Managing Director was the amazing Cecil Bianchi. Bianchi had been Charles Jarrott’s mechanic in the 1903 Paris - Madrid and other early motor races, had driven at Brooklands and appears to have been ‘acquired’ by Crossley when they took over Charles Jarrott & Letts Ltd, in 1910. He became responsible for all Crossley test work as Works Manager and later Chief Engineer until 1927. He then joined Bean Cars Ltd and helped them weather the crisis of receivership and re-birth in November 1933 and scoured the country to secure contracts to make the new company viable.



#127 robert dick

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:56

May 1904, Bennett elimination on the Isle of Man - Bianchi without moustache:
gbeli04.jpg

so that, in my eyes, the driver at the wheel of the Wolseley in the Bastogne photo was Cecil Bianchi.
 



#128 Doug Nye

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 09:02

Here's another comparison - 1906 Grand Prix de l'ACF at Le Mans, Henri Tart's brutal Panhard, scrabbling for grip in a village street...

 

GPL-200-BRANGER-HENRI-TARTE-PANHARD-1906

 

Branger captured the image above just outside No 16, Rue Faidherbe, Connerre...the location subsequently captured 110 years later by Google Earth Street View here - below - in June 2016:

 

Screenshot-2019-05-05-at-09-40-35.jpg

 

DCN


Edited by Doug Nye, 06 May 2019 - 13:38.


#129 Regazzoni

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 15:51

If I may add a ‘younger’ comparison, it stems from a photo Mr Nye posted few years back in a Xmas quiz, IIRC, and which was taken in my hometown. It relates to the Trofeo Jolly Hotels, contested only in 1965, a precursor of Giro d’Italia.

The place is in San Benedetto del Tronto, Mid Adriatic, and the location was called at the time Viale delle Palme. I distinctly recall in the Seventies the palms in that location being that overgrown and the broken pavement, my uncle used to run a commercial business just on that stretch of road.

San-Benedetto.jpg

This is the place today, it is called Viale Bruno Buozzi (a parallel to this street has been renamed as the new viale delle Palme, but it’s not the one in the picture). Now it’s all a pedestrianised area, Google couldn’t cover it because cars cannot access it. Due also to illness problems of the palms, the first row was removed in the second half of the ‘80s, and now the street is wider, the older central tarmac section of the street still visible. This photo I think is taken in the opposite direction of the one above.

Viale-Bruno-Buozzi-foto-Giulia-Pirri-780

These are old postcards photos found online that show how it was in the ’50s-‘60s, just like the race photo above.

Sbenedetto-Del-Tronto-Viale-Delle-Palme-

S-Benedetto-Del-Tronto-Viale-Delle-Palme



#130 robert dick

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 06:51

Concerning Panhard driver Tart:

 

Henri Tart was a former bicycle and tricycle rider,
aged 38 when he started in the Grand Prix at Le Mans.

 

tart.jpg

In 1906 his Tart & Cie. was the Berliet agency in Paris, and sold second hand Panhards and Dietrichs.

 

tart02.jpg

When he drove a Panhard in 1904 and 1905, the name of Tart's riding mechanic was Jarlet, described as his brother-in-law (first name ?; maybe L. Jarlet, a garagiste in Neuilly, Boulevard Victor-Hugo).
The name of Tart's mechanic in the Grand Prix at Le Mans was not mentioned explicitly (at least I didn't find it).
 



#131 Regazzoni

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 08:13

Taruffi on Lancia D24 in the 1954 Mille Miglia:

Taruffi-Lancia-D24-1954.jpg

Taruffi in the winning Ferrari 315 S in the last Mille Miglia in 1957:

vincitore-57-Taruffi-Ferrari-315-S.jpg

This is the place today in San Benedetto, nothing's changed, that is the National Adriatic main road (SS16, Strada Statale n. 16), in the old part of town, at the crossing with Via Gino Moretti. Can't find the photo of Moss with Jenks jumping in that location.

SBT-2018.jpg



#132 GTMRacer

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 10:42

I love this thread, Lancia D24 at full chat is a beautiful image. Brave fellows indeed!

#133 robert dick

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 11:35

Early view of the fascinating Le Mans tunnel:

lmtunnel06.jpg


Peculiarity of the Panhard racer - control in the steering wheel:

plvolant04.jpg
 



#134 Doug Nye

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 13:36

Taruffi on Lancia D24 in the 1954 Mille Miglia:

Taruffi-Lancia-D24-1954.jpg

Taruffi in the winning Ferrari 315 S in the last Mille Miglia in 1957:

vincitore-57-Taruffi-Ferrari-315-S.jpg

This is the place today in San Benedetto, nothing's changed, that is the National Adriatic main road (SS16, Strada Statale n. 16), in the old part of town, at the crossing with Via Gino Moretti. Can't find the photo of Moss with Jenks jumping in that location.

SBT-2018.jpg

 

You've touched a nerve here with the famous photo of Taruffi aviating through San Benedetto in the Lancia.  Whenever he saw that shot Jenks would always express regret that he'd never ever seen a matching one of Moss and himself at that same spot in the 1955 Mercedes-Benz...  He always wondered if perhaps - that year - no photographers had been allowed to lie in wait at that point.

 

And thank you again Robert for verifying 'Tart' not 'Tarte'.

 

DCN


Edited by Doug Nye, 06 May 2019 - 13:37.


#135 Doug Nye

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 14:37

Here's the start of the middlingly-significant 1906 Criterium Belge rally (in effect), pictured below in the Place Pouhon at Spa, Belgium.  The event had been organised by the ACs of Belgium, Namur, Luxembourg and Spa in conjunction with the publishers of ‘Les Sports’ magazine.  Entries were arranged in six capacity classes, and the endurance route covered 1,000kms at a minimum average speed of 20, 25 or 30km/h dependent upon horsepower rating.  A final 500kms speed race was then run around the Circuit de la Meuse based on Dinant.  

 

Stage 1 was from Spa to Nimegen, Holland, along the valleys of the Meuse and Rhine. The route then ran from Nimegen to Cologne, through Cleves, Krefeld and Dusseldorf - then Cologne to Luxembourg - Luxembourg to Reims - then to Dinant.  The overall winner was judged to be Hautvast’s Pipe, with Rigolly’s Gobron 2nd fastest overall and winner of the best foreign-car award.

 
GPL-BRANGER-200-2-START-AT-SPA-1906-Oste
 

 

Screenshot-2019-05-06-at-14-53-11.png
 
DCN

Edited by Doug Nye, 06 May 2019 - 14:38.


#136 Regazzoni

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 19:27

Caracciola, Livorno, Coppa Ciano 1938

Caracciola-Livorno-1938.jpg

Via dei Bagni, Livorno. Mind-boggling.

via-bagni.jpg

Via-dei-Bagni.jpg



#137 Regazzoni

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 20:00

You've touched a nerve here with the famous photo of Taruffi aviating through San Benedetto in the Lancia.  Whenever he saw that shot Jenks would always express regret that he'd never ever seen a matching one of Moss and himself at that same spot in the 1955 Mercedes-Benz...  He always wondered if perhaps - that year - no photographers had been allowed to lie in wait at that point.

 

And thank you again Robert for verifying 'Tart' not 'Tarte'.

 

DCN

Here it is, not 'aviating', perhaps just landed. Quite a few people watching the cars go by, maybe the news they were the ones to beat preceded them.

moss-and-jenks.jpg



#138 Tim Murray

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 20:10

Caracciola, Livorno, Coppa Ciano 1938
Caracciola-Livorno-1938.jpg
Via dei Bagni, Livorno. Mind-boggling.
via-bagni.jpg
Via-dei-Bagni.jpg


Gordon Bennett! So they came blatting along here at - what - 150+ mph?

76-D45-DB8-A896-42-F4-AAF7-B3422-F5-BD6-

then braked to - what - 30 mph?, avoided the little old lady with the shopping basket, then threaded themselves into that narrow Via dei Bagni just past the Bar Isolani. Amazing - I do hope there was an escape road.  ;)

#139 Regazzoni

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 20:22

I do hope there was an escape road.  ;)

The sea...

 

The street is the same as 81 years ago, the profile of the shadow of the buildings on the tarmac is exactly the same.



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#140 Doug Nye

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 20:27

Stupendous!  Imagine the din...!

 

And thank you for the 300SLR shot Regga - Jenks would have loved to have seen it, even though he would quite possibly not say so - instead criticising the poor photographer for having "missed the real shot"...

 

DCN



#141 Ray Bell

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Posted 07 May 2019 - 21:27

Who needs Google Earth?

Read 'em and weep:

0519frfr4-Gueuxcorner1.jpg

0519frfr4-Gueuxcorner2.jpg

0519frfr4-Gueuxexit1.jpg

0519frfr4-Gueuxexit2.jpg

And, yes, imagine the din!

#142 robert dick

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 07:21

Henri Tart, who drove No. 10B Panhard in the Grand Prix at Le Mans,
finished the 1899 Tour de France ("pour automobiles") sitting on the fuel tank:
tarttdf99.jpg

= = = =

The "Belgian Criterium" in the magazine The Automobile/New York/1906:

critbelg06d.jpg


Criterium winner Lucien Hautvast and the Pipe on the front page of La Vie au Grand Air:

critbelg06c.jpg


Hautvast at the wheel of the Pipe:

critbelg06b.jpg


The hemi-head of the Pipe engine, designed by Otto Pfänder
(Pfänder was killed in 1907 when trying the Taunus course for the Kaiserpreis race;
Pfänder had been one of Wilhelm Maybach's assistants, and was responsible for the gearbox of the first Mercedes):

critbelg06e.jpg
critbelg06f.jpg
 



#143 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 08:35

Here's a Google Earth update...

0519lobethal1.jpg

0519fr-GElobethal1.jpg

#144 Doug Nye

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 12:19

Where is that Ray?

 

DCN



#145 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 13:08

The downhill run into Lobethal, Doug...

Original photo from the 1948 meeting. The co-ordinates are: 34°54'33.7"S 138°52'39.3"E

Meantime:

Another one without Google Earth...

032019eurocomparepic.jpg

0319fr2016euroecompare.jpg

Amiens, after the right turn into the village of Moreuil.

Edited by Ray Bell, 08 May 2019 - 13:12.


#146 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 14:23

Another couple:

Watkins Glen, 1952, at the end of the climb up from the bridge...

0419watkinsglen1.jpg

0519fr2012watkinsglen1.jpg

Elkhart Lake mid-fifties, heading through the town:

0519elkhartlake1.jpg

0519fr2014elkhartlake1.jpg

#147 Doug Nye

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 17:01

That last comparison - Elkhart Lake - is outstanding... I have always enjoyed visiting places "where it really happened", and here we can share some of that.

 

DCN



#148 cpbell

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 21:40

Caracciola, Livorno, Coppa Ciano 1938

Makes you realise that the moaning surrounding the width of the section of the Baku circuit past the castle is rather overdone! :drunk:



#149 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 22:16

Later this month I'm taking my van for a drive...

I very well may drop down to the Barossa while I'm working around Port Augusta and take it for a run around Nuriootpa and Lobethal...

It will then be the only vehicle in the world which has been driven around Elkhart Lake, Watkins Glen, Savannah (US Grand Prize), Nuriootpa and Lobethal (Australian Grand Prix) road circuits. In time, I guess, Southport will be added to the list - AGP 1954.

A couple of weeks later it will become, I'm pretty sure, the only vehicle which has seen Niagara Falls, the Brooklyn Bridge, Yosemite National Park, The Grand Canyon, Yellowstone National Park, Glacier National Park and Ayers Rock.

In time I'll see if I can find pics of racing at Brno (1947-64 version), Spa (the real thing), Pau, and maybe more of Reims and Amiens to go with the pics I have. But they didn't come from the van.

It's actually harder using these pics than Google Earth, as I take photos going around a circuit, so you need rear views of the cars to match them. The ones from Reims I took specifically to match the photos I'd seen hanging on the wall at:

0519fr-F4bistrotducircuit.jpg

This place is on the left about where the white van is in the colour version of the approach to the corner in Gueux. Lots of pictures on the walls.



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Edited by Ray Bell, 08 May 2019 - 22:49.


#150 Ray Bell

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 22:17

Oh yeah, I have Bari and Pescara as well...

But I got lost where the Pescara circuit went within the town.