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Juan Manuel Correa injury and recovery thread [split]


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#151 Izzyeviel

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 13:36

so he hasn't gotten out of bed for what nearly 2 months? I hope my doctors see this. The sadistic bastards made me get out of bed and walk hours after major surgery. 



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#152 SophieB

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 09:27

so he hasn't gotten out of bed for what nearly 2 months? I hope my doctors see this. The sadistic bastards made me get out of bed and walk hours after major surgery. 

 

I hope you're doing okay now.

 

It's good to see progress for Juan Manuel Correa. It looks like he has a long road ahead of him but good to see the (literal) first steps taken on it.



#153 Izzyeviel

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 11:46

I hope you're doing okay now.

 

It's good to see progress for Juan Manuel Correa. It looks like he has a long road ahead of him but good to see the (literal) first steps taken on it.

oh dont worry, it was a few years ago. But the docs are always very insistent the patient starts moving around as soon as possible - even if the patient is really ill/in a lot of pain. Just goes to show what an ordeal he's been through.



#154 maximilian

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 13:44

Looks very painful... and if you peek at the scaffold holding together his leg... ouch...!  Obviously it was shattered into many pieces.  I hope his recovery will continue well, I don't think we can take it for granted yet that he won't have complications.  It would be astonishing to see him racing again.  All the best! 



#155 owenmahamilton

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 19:03

Just seen this on twitter:

 

https://twitter.com/...6451450880?s=20



#156 SophieB

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 08:27

Just seen this on twitter:

 

https://twitter.com/...6451450880?s=20

 

Just for those who can't/won't see twitter:

 

EIOf1uwWsAQwZJt.jpg

 

And also, from Billy Monger's own account, this message of support:

Got the chance to see this fighter @JMCorrea__ today. He’s through the worst of his surgeries and more importantly is still smiling and ready to kick some ass 1f918-1f3fc.png Big love mate, we’re all behind you 1f499.png1f4aa-1f3fc.png

 

The amazing way Billy Monger continues to repay the love/support shown to him is so touching.



#157 E1pix

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 18:50

Got that right... a Genuine hero.

#158 messy

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 18:53

Billy Monger is a brilliant person. 



#159 Lotusseven

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 18:04

An interview with Juan Manuel by expreso.ec :

 

Juan Manuel Correa, life after the accident

The Ecuadorian pilot rises "like the phoenix." From Miami, he spoke for Express and says he is determined to return in a year.

NOV 17, 2019 / 00:01
 
 
 

The days in Miami, United States, are slow for the Ecuadorian car driver Juan Manuel Correa. Away from the sun and the beach, characteristic of this part of the continent, the young tricolor shows a tempera of steel, considering that he is barely 20 years old and that he was on the verge of death on August 21, when he suffered serious injuries in the terrible Formula 2 accident in Belgium.

The idea is clear: it will not move away from cars or racing circuits. He is aware that he was born again and that he has a purpose to fulfill: to be inspiration. Therefore, after waking up from induced coma, Correa began his recovery in the northern country from where he spoke with EXPRESS. He is motivated, continues his rehabilitation with his family and has set a date to return. That does not erase him from the mind that was a few millimeters from the French pilot Anthoine Hubert, who did die. They were friends, they met in the GP3 series, which is one step below the Formula 2 Championship of the International Automobile Federation (FIA).

- Are you afraid to return?

- I wouldn't call it fear; I realized that many drivers and people who are in the racing world have a kind of ignorance towards the risks that we all know this sport has. After what happened to me, I am sure that the next few times I climb a race car will be something I will think about more, but it is not fear; If I were afraid I wouldn't even be thinking about returning to discipline.

- Then, he will come back

- Clear. I'm still involved in the world of racing, I don't want to take off much if I plan to run again in a year or a year and a half. It is important to stay involved and that is what I plan to do. I currently organize my life and decipher how I will do it the following months. Then I will start again my routines and all that that entails. I want to go back to the tracks, that's my goal.

- How do you stay involved in sports?

- I follow the competitions, I also keep in touch with my Alfa Romeo team and with Sauber Junior Team, of Formula 2; In fact, Sauber wants me to work with them while I recover, but I don't know if it's possible because I have to be here in Miami for my recovery. I still think of some ideas to stay involved with them.

- What do you think are your future plans?

- I think it's too early to say what discipline I am targeting. I know I want to run again, but I don't know if it will be in Formula 2 or something else. At the moment I don't think about that much because I still have so many months to recover that I prefer not to spend my energy thinking about that; All I do is keep in touch with the world of motor racing.

 

-What time do you have to do rehabilitation work?

- It depends, for walking it can be six to seven months, maybe longer; while to be fit to run again, at least one year. However, there is no specific time because there are many factors to analyze such as my right foot and all the surgeries I have planned yet.

- What do you remember about the accident?

- I remember everything perfectly. It was very fast. When Anthoine Hubert collided ahead of me, the piece of a broken piece got under my car, which caused my front tires to stay in the air and I lost control. I went straight and when I looked up I went straight to another car. I immediately felt pain in my legs. At that moment, my car started to smoke, so I unbuckled my seat belt and crawled out of the vehicle. Then the doctors arrived and I immediately asked them to sleep because it was a very strong, intense pain.

- What did you think when you heard that Anthoine Hubert died?

- It was very difficult to accept and digest. It's hard to lose someone in this discipline, but much more if it's someone who was your track partner. He was a good friend, we had a good relationship. I had even run with him in GP3 and I knew him very well. It is not for nothing, but it was one of the most beloved people in the middle; with the one that best took me in Formula 2.

- What did you think of the support messages sent to you by different F1 characters?

- There were several that caught my attention, obviously one of them was that of Sebastián Vettel (4 times world champion). However, I also had messages from athletes around the world, but I was more surprised by those from other disciplines. Obviously the world of F1 and F2 are very connected, so it was a bit of waiting, but when I saw the messages of Valentino Rossi and Marc Marques (motorcyclists), I was very excited, since they didn't have to send me a message; It was very cool.

- What did the specialists you have asked about your injury tell you?

- The doctors have been sincere, they say that the most likely thing is that I don't have a one hundred percent recovery on my right foot, but luckily in Formula 2 or 1 the physical issue is different from what if I were a footballer. Thank God, with the right foot you just need to accelerate, so the most important thing for us is the upper part of the body. Nor do I want to say that I will run again because I don't know how my right leg will end, that is the reality right now, but I have faith that he will recover well enough to accelerate without problems.

- What was the hardest thing to accept about the accident?

- Whatever you have achieved in the season (the tricolor was podium in several circuits this year) everything goes to waste. Hopefully it's only a year because it's still not safe. It is something that has already happened and I cannot change; Now I have to make the best recovery.

 

https://www.expreso....dente-LL3278962

 

Here is another interview and a short video.

https://www.ecuavisa...-volver-f2-2021

 

Feel for JM so much because I know the feeling of going from active to passive. The waiting, the lonley days and all the thoughts of everything as happened and what will come.
I really hope that the coming surgeries will go well and he can come back to F2 in 2021.
 
Strange that nothing (accident report) has been released by the FIA yet since the tragic incident.

 

Edit: Text translated in Google Translate. 


Edited by Lotusseven, 19 November 2019 - 18:11.


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#160 mangeliiito

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Posted 21 November 2019 - 15:21

https://f1feederseri...talks-anthoine/

Another great article. I admire his mindset so much, he doesn't shy away from it, but is trying to work through it. Really, really hope he makes a full recovery, despite what the doctors are saying.

#161 E1pix

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 05:13

Wonderful posts, Thanks to you both.

#162 Marklar

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 10:23

That somehow doesnt surprise me
 

 

The 20-year-old said he received no support from the FIA in the aftermath of the tragic accident, suggesting that the governing body's specialized medical assistance could have helped his Belgian doctors in Liège deal with the particular trauma he had suffered.

 
"Everyone went to Monza the next day after the accident," he remembered.
 
"I stayed in the hospital and I almost died four days after the accident. And there was nobody from the FIA or someone who looked after me.
 
"The reason that I almost died was because of the strong G-forces that you can only have after such a serious accident.
 
"The doctors in the hospital in Belgium didn't know what that was because they had never seen anyone who had survived such a big impact."
 
Correa's parents immediately took control of their son's plight, airlifting him to London where he underwent a series of crucial operations to save his leg.

https://f1i.com/news...of-support.html

Though not sure how common/helpful it would be to have FIA doctors meddling with the locals' work I guess.


Edited by Marklar, 30 January 2020 - 10:24.


#163 Peat

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 11:01

That would simply not happen in the structure that Dr's Olvey & Trammell created in the states. 



#164 Myrvold

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 11:30

Not sure it would happen with (should've been Sir) Sid Watkins either.



#165 Anja

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 11:58

Sounds really bad, you'd think it should be common sense to have someone specialized helping with his treatment.


Edited by Anja, 30 January 2020 - 11:58.


#166 SophieB

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 13:01

Seems really poor if it's accurate that the FIA just entirely left them to it.



#167 pdac

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 13:17

With my cynics hat on I wonder if this has to do with the FIA trying to absolve itself (legally) of any responsibility.



#168 Pimpwerx

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 13:22

I'm late to the pic Sophie posted, but just when you think you can't like Billmonger (I'm gonna make this a thing) more, he goes and does something like that. That's really nice.

 

As for the FIA kinda abandoning Correa to take care of himself, that's really cold-hearted. You gotta support your athletes. He got hurt helping to put on a show. The least they can do it provide his doctors with medical info that might have been necessary to save his life. Someone dropped the ball bigtime.



#169 maximilian

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 14:08

Is there anything positive we can even say about the FIA at all at this point?  ANYTHING?  Seems like whenever I hear FIA mentioned in a sentence, the sentence ends up telling me something I don't wanna hear.

 

Change my mind.



#170 Marklar

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 18:13

The response from the doctor
 

 

The chief medical officer at Spa, doctor Christian Wahlen, described the care Correa received immediately following the crash to RaceFans.

“Juan Manuel Correa received immediate medical attention at the scene of the accident, administered by the circuit-appointed doctor who is an experienced anaesthetist,” said Wahlen.
“The activities of medical staff attending the accident were coordinated by FIA deputy F1 medical delegate and F1 rescue coordinator doctor Ian Roberts. Juan Manuel received continuous care as he was transported by ambulance to the track medical centre. On arrival he was stabilised by the trauma team, who are under my responsibility as chief medical officer for this grand prix.
“After consulting with doctor Alain Chantegret, FIA F1 medical delegate, it was clear from the nature of his injuries that Juan Manuel needed to be transferred immediately by helicopter to the care of the Center Hospitalier Universitaire Liège (CHU Liège) to receive more specialist medical and operative care.”
[...]
“In my role as chief medical officer and as an FIA medical delegate, I remained in constant contact with the hospital and also visited Juan Manuel on Monday 2nd September, where he was recovering well from the surgery to his feet,” said Wahlen. “That same day, Gérard Saillant contacted Juan Manuel’s father, Juan Carlos Correa, to assure them that he was at their disposal.“
On Tuesday morning Juan Manuel developed symptoms indicating a respiratory problem. On the same day, the Correa family took the decision to transfer him to a specialist clinic at a hospital in London to receive orthopaedic treatment to his right foot at the earliest opportunity.”

https://www.racefans...fter-spa-crash/



#171 SenorSjon

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 18:35

What does he expect from FIA? Why would any governing association meddle too much with this? Do the FIFA, IAAF, UCI or UEFA care for injured players after receiving first aid from the event?

#172 Kalmake

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 18:57

Is there anything positive we can even say about the FIA at all at this point?  ANYTHING?  Seems like whenever I hear FIA mentioned in a sentence, the sentence ends up telling me something I don't wanna hear.

 

Change my mind.

They regulated the car and the event so that the accident was survivable?



#173 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 19:46

Are they then responsible for the injuries, or when a driver doesn't survive? They seem to move much quicker when the threat is to their reputation rather than risks to their contestants. 



#174 Talisman

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 00:17

I don’t see the problem here. FIA affiliated staff stabilised him, made the decision to transfer him to an appropriate hospital and handed over his care to them. They remained in contact with him and the hospital after his care was transferred to them. After transfer they no longer have any responsibility for him. Nor would the FA had he been a footballer in the U.K. in a similar position. He was out of their jurisdiction.

He claims the FIA team would have had the relevant expertise to deal with his subsequent respiratory issue. What issue was that? Why does he think Drs trained specifically for the acute stabilisation of patients would have had the appropriate expertise to deal with that?

What serious respiratory problem could he have had that wouldn’t have prevented his transfer to the U.K., presumably by air, on the same day it was diagnosed?

I smell BS here, and rather like Ralf’s attempt to blame the hospital in Indianapolis for missing a fracture partly to cover for himself having self discharged from their care against advice I suspect there’s another angle we aren’t being made aware of.

Edited by Talisman, 02 February 2020 - 00:43.


#175 goldenboy

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 00:27

This is a good question. I agreed when I read the above comments that at some point the FIA do not have responsibility, but it would be a great thing to see them take much more interest in what happens to a critically injured driver from one of their series in the weeks after.

I wonder what the insurance situation is. I genuinely don't know.

#176 wheadon1985

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 01:20

He would be insured by the ASN (national governing body) of the country where the event is held as they will have issued the permit for the meeting. This is the same from club racing all the way to Formula 1, WEC etc.

#177 Sterzo

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 21:11

The stated issue is that the hospital doctors didn't have experience of the effect of such high g-forces on the lungs. Not sure we should be blaming the FIA as an organisation for that. Three questions:

 

1. Would the circuit doctor have had previous experience of such an accident? Sounds unlikely.

2. Should the circuit doctor have anticipated that the hospital doctors wouldn't have the experience? Sounds unreasonable.

3. Should Todt and the FIA officials have anticipated that a trauma unit at a fixed-base hospital would rely on guidance from a circuit doctor? Sounds like a ludicrous expectation.

 

Every sympathy for Correa and his family, but can't see criticism of the FIA is in order here.



#178 Rediscoveryx

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 03:36

Also, let’s not forget that there was a race meeting in Italy the following weekend for which the FIA medical staff presumably was needed.

#179 SophieB

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 07:59

I don’t see the problem here. FIA affiliated staff stabilised him, made the decision to transfer him to an appropriate hospital and handed over his care to them. They remained in contact with him and the hospital after his care was transferred to them. After transfer they no longer have any responsibility for him. Nor would the FA had he been a footballer in the U.K. in a similar position. He was out of their jurisdiction.

He claims the FIA team would have had the relevant expertise to deal with his subsequent respiratory issue. What issue was that? Why does he think Drs trained specifically for the acute stabilisation of patients would have had the appropriate expertise to deal with that?

What serious respiratory problem could he have had that wouldn’t have prevented his transfer to the U.K., presumably by air, on the same day it was diagnosed?

I smell BS here, and rather like Ralf’s attempt to blame the hospital in Indianapolis for missing a fracture partly to cover for himself having self discharged from their care against advice I suspect there’s another angle we aren’t being made aware of.

 

It could be. It could also be an honest misunderstanding of how things work from the driver and his family, I guess.



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#180 ANF

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 10:36

The response from the doctor
 
https://www.racefans...fter-spa-crash/

Allow me to do some creative cut and paste.


Wahlen: “On Tuesday morning Juan Manuel developed symptoms indicating a respiratory problem.”

Correa: “The doctors in the hospital in Belgium didn't know what that was because they had never seen anyone who had survived such a big impact.”

Wahlen: “On the same day, the Correa family took the decision to transfer him to a specialist clinic at a hospital in London to receive orthopaedic treatment to his right foot at the earliest opportunity.”

 
...

#181 absinthedude

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 12:18

I am not sure where the FIA has done wrong.

 

From what I know of the system, the FIA ensures that emergency medical teams are able to treat and stabilise hurt drivers at the trackside or track medical centre. They seem to have accomplished this well.

 

Then there is always a hospital nearby nominated for evacuation of patients who have injuries which cannot be dealt with at the track. In some cases there's more than one hospital (eg trauma specialisation, or burns unit). The FIA do have a duty of care to ensure that each nominated hospital suitable to deal with the injuries racing drivers might incur. It seems that the g-force Correa suffered was out of the realm of experience of this hospital and they were surprised a few days later when he started to go into respiratory failure. Thankfully somehow the Correa family found out that the London hospital where they did know how to treat his condition and he's pulled through. 

 

If a major hospital with a trauma centre (as I assume the Belgian hospital was) didn't know....it's quite likely not something that any FIA doctor or medical delegate would have have been able to advise on. If the FIA can possibly have dropped the ball at any point it would be in choosing the hosptial...but it sounds like what happened to Correa is extremely rare. In hindsight future hospitals can be told about this possible complication of severe g-force. But hindsight is always perfect.

 

The question is, "could the FIA have reasonably done more?". And I am not sure that there's anything wrong in trusting a major hospital, top doctors and surgeons. 



#182 Talisman

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 17:25

 It seems that the g-force Correa suffered was out of the realm of experience of this hospital and they were surprised a few days later when he started to go into respiratory failure. Thankfully somehow the Correa family found out that the London hospital where they did know how to treat his condition and he's pulled through. 

 

What exactly was the respiratory problem he had?  If it was so critical why did they feel it safe to transport him all the way to London to treat his foot rather than stay in the intensive care unit where he was?  These two parts of his account are not compatible and therefore I suspect that whatever issue Correa had was not as significant as he or his entourage believe.

 

BTW high energy impacts are high energy impacts.  There is a limited variety of complications that can occur.  I doubt unfamiliarity with high G-force accidents would be relevant in a trauma centre, one that includes the Spa-Francorchamps circuit in its referral footprint.  Again I cannot think of a serious complication that could arise that would best be resolved by an international transfer to London to resolve his foot injury which would then be of secondary importance.

 

Patients have an inherent advantage over the medical institution or individuals they complain in public about.  The medical institutions are bound by their duty to protect patient confidentiality so by definition cannot provide a full account of events in public without the consent of the patient.  Therefore the narrative is almost always defined by the complainant.  In this case their narrative simply doesn't make sense.  


Edited by Talisman, 03 February 2020 - 17:30.