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Has anyone got a refund for tickets purchased for the vietnam race(or any other race?)


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#1 jonneymendoza

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 11:00

HI i called f1 ticket place asking for a refund and they said they are still organising stuff with the f1 organisation on what options we have in terms of refund, rebooking it etc etc as in theory, the race is "posponed" no "canceled" ......
 
I cant see what other date they can do the race lol..
 
First my travel agent, travel insurance and airline(vietnamese airways) are refusing to entertain the idea of giving me a refund for my flight as i simply could not go because
 
  1. Cant apply for visa's
  2. even with visa, vietnam are denying entry to the country for british citizens.
My flight was last saturday by the way..
 
Such a piss take these lot are and i hope the airlines, f1 and the travel agent all go bust. no remorse from me whatsoever

 



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#2 SenorSjon

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 11:14

I have 3 tickets for Monza in one of the most affected areas in Italy... It is still 5+ months away, so I'm not worried yet.



#3 ensign14

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 11:14

Got a refund for Bahrain about a fortnight ago.



#4 jonneymendoza

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 15:53

Got a refund for Bahrain about a fortnight ago.

Damm you are lucky



#5 jjcale

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 16:40

Damm you are lucky

 

Govt race + they cancelled spectators themselves ....

 

Its not just F1 that people are struggling for claw backs because of Covid....



#6 richardprice

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 19:51

If airlines, ticket agents or travel agents arent playing ball with regard to refunds, and you put at least £100 of each single purchase on a UK credit card, then you can claim the full amount of that purchase back from the credit card provider under Consumer Credit Act Section 75 rules - https://www.which.co...umer-credit-act

You didnt receive the service you purchased - that makes the credit card company just as liable as the service supplier or ticket seller.

#7 pdac

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 21:49

If airlines, ticket agents or travel agents arent playing ball with regard to refunds, and you put at least £100 of each single purchase on a UK credit card, then you can claim the full amount of that purchase back from the credit card provider under Consumer Credit Act Section 75 rules - https://www.which.co...umer-credit-act

You didnt receive the service you purchased - that makes the credit card company just as liable as the service supplier or ticket seller.

 

I'm not sure, but I suspect that if you have booked tickets associated with an event, you can only claim once the event has been cancelled or a new date has been published. I'm guessing that if they simply say it's postponed, the event is still on and you would not be entitled to a refund until it's clear that you cannot make the new date (or do not wish to). I suppose, though, that if they do not announce a replacement date before the old date passes, then you could argue that the event has actually been cancelled. I'm just guessing here, though.



#8 Raemius

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 03:02

I was supposed to fly out on this Saturday.

My flights are being refunded by the airline (AirAsia) because the Malaysian Government closed the borders, so I could not fly into KL from Perth or back again, or from KL to Hanoi and back.

I've cancelled all my accomodation FOC because I booked through Booking.com

But the F1 ticket agent (BookF1) refuse to refund, only offering a voucher for another event. I think the problem is that they cannot get their money back because the event is postponed, not cancelled. It's the GP organiser/promoter that's screwing us all over at the moment by not cancelling.

I'm hoping my travel insurance covers it, as I took out an annual multi-trip policy 11 months ago and booked this all back in early September, before Covid-19 existed.



#9 richardprice

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 03:10

I'm not sure, but I suspect that if you have booked tickets associated with an event, you can only claim once the event has been cancelled or a new date has been published. I'm guessing that if they simply say it's postponed, the event is still on and you would not be entitled to a refund until it's clear that you cannot make the new date (or do not wish to). I suppose, though, that if they do not announce a replacement date before the old date passes, then you could argue that the event has actually been cancelled. I'm just guessing here, though.

 

Yes, postponement with a denied refund would be covered under Section 75 claims - an event cannot simply postpone to a random date or a "to be determined" date and demand you accept it, they are in breach of contract by not performing the event on the date agreed in the original purchase.



#10 Beri

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 10:49

Yes, postponement with a denied refund would be covered under Section 75 claims - an event cannot simply postpone to a random date or a "to be determined" date and demand you accept it, they are in breach of contract by not performing the event on the date agreed in the original purchase.

 

It all depends on the teenie tiny letters on your ticket and the emails youve gotten. This all varies per country. And it varies per organisation that organizes the Grand Prix event. Plus the refund clauses do vary even if its a European event or an event abroad. And this again even varies if you are European or not. Because if you are European, usually there is the European security clause for cases like this, but hey... Brexit.

 

So it isnt as plain and simple as you put it. This will take ages to find out for consumers where to even get your refund. So thats why you usually go to the seller of the product. But I'll bet you that even they havent got everything in order at the moment also, because hey.. Corona!

 

They have a lot more to worry about than that one customer asking for his money back. They have to worry about all the customers wanting their money back and even to keep on existing.

 

I have got tickets myself for the Dutch Grand Prix. But since that one is postponed, the organization up there has stated that the tickets will remain valid for the next event. 



#11 pdac

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 17:05

Yes, postponement with a denied refund would be covered under Section 75 claims - an event cannot simply postpone to a random date or a "to be determined" date and demand you accept it, they are in breach of contract by not performing the event on the date agreed in the original purchase.

 

Yes, but what I was trying to get at is that you might have to wait until the original date passes before your claim becomes a valid one.



#12 richardprice

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 17:54

It all depends on the teenie tiny letters on your ticket and the emails youve gotten. This all varies per country. And it varies per organisation that organizes the Grand Prix event. Plus the refund clauses do vary even if its a European event or an event abroad. And this again even varies if you are European or not. Because if you are European, usually there is the European security clause for cases like this, but hey... Brexit.
 
So it isnt as plain and simple as you put it. This will take ages to find out for consumers where to even get your refund. So thats why you usually go to the seller of the product. But I'll bet you that even they havent got everything in order at the moment also, because hey.. Corona!
 
They have a lot more to worry about than that one customer asking for his money back. They have to worry about all the customers wanting their money back and even to keep on existing.
 
I have got tickets myself for the Dutch Grand Prix. But since that one is postponed, the organization up there has stated that the tickets will remain valid for the next event.


You arent getting it - this is breach of contract and the credit card company is one of the parties to that contract, under UK law they became a liable party when they issued you a credit card you used to make the purchase.

The purchase was for a ticket to watch an event on a given day - thats the contract, regardless of what any purchase terms try and weasel.

Any terms of purchase which try and allow the event to basically move the date at will are unlawful under UK consumer legislation and do not interfere with your rights to a refund - the credit card company remains liable, regardless of what the terms of purchase say.

The fact that the purchase was made for a foreign event does not matter, the UK credit card company is still liable. Brexit changes nothing here because the credit card companies liability is based on UK legislation.

You are also missing the fact that in my suggestion, neither you nor the credit card company is dealing with the event for this refund - you are dealing solely with the credit card company and do not have to wait for any outcome of any action between the card company and the event organisers - whether the credit card company recovers the cost of the refund is none of your concern, the credit card company has to deal with you as if they were the original seller, and thus refund you out of their own pocket. Because you made the purchase on their card, the credit company is individually liable for that purchase.

The fact that the ticket might be valid for the next event does not matter. The fact that the event has been postponed without a new date set and not cancelled does not matter. The fact that the original date has not yet passed does not matter. In all of these cases by announcing the postponement the event is, under UK consumer law, in breach of contract and that makes the credit card company liable.

#13 richardprice

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 17:56

Yes, but what I was trying to get at is that you might have to wait until the original date passes before your claim becomes a valid one.


No you dont, they already breached the contract by issuing the original postponement - you cannot make travel plans that way, hence it being a breach of contract, it doesnt matter if they later go ahead with the original date because they already cast major doubt on your purchase and caused you hardship. You can claim against the credit card company today.

#14 pdac

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 20:51

No you dont, they already breached the contract by issuing the original postponement - you cannot make travel plans that way, hence it being a breach of contract, it doesnt matter if they later go ahead with the original date because they already cast major doubt on your purchase and caused you hardship. You can claim against the credit card company today.

 

You are missing one crucial point here. There has to be a breach of contract. That has to be established first. It's not enough just to say "oh, it's going to happen at a different time and I can't make that time", there needs to be (and there usually is) explicit or implied acceptance by the seller that a re-arrangement will entitle you to a refund.

 

Moreover, the link to the Which site that you supplied also points out about paying through an agent. So, if you have not bought tickets from the venue itself, but through an agent acting on behalf of the venue, then section 75 may not apply (and you do not have a valid claim against the Credit Card company).

 

Edit: Here's the text:

A good example of this is when you buy concert tickets. If you buy direct from the venue, then Section 75 may apply if the cost is over £100. If you buy through a ticket agency, then it may not.

 


Edited by pdac, 26 March 2020 - 20:53.


#15 Beri

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 22:29

You arent getting it - this is breach of contract and the credit card company is one of the parties to that contract, under UK law they became a liable party when they issued you a credit card you used to make the purchase.

The purchase was for a ticket to watch an event on a given day - thats the contract, regardless of what any purchase terms try and weasel.

Any terms of purchase which try and allow the event to basically move the date at will are unlawful under UK consumer legislation and do not interfere with your rights to a refund - the credit card company remains liable, regardless of what the terms of purchase say.

The fact that the purchase was made for a foreign event does not matter, the UK credit card company is still liable. Brexit changes nothing here because the credit card companies liability is based on UK legislation.

You are also missing the fact that in my suggestion, neither you nor the credit card company is dealing with the event for this refund - you are dealing solely with the credit card company and do not have to wait for any outcome of any action between the card company and the event organisers - whether the credit card company recovers the cost of the refund is none of your concern, the credit card company has to deal with you as if they were the original seller, and thus refund you out of their own pocket. Because you made the purchase on their card, the credit company is individually liable for that purchase.

The fact that the ticket might be valid for the next event does not matter. The fact that the event has been postponed without a new date set and not cancelled does not matter. The fact that the original date has not yet passed does not matter. In all of these cases by announcing the postponement the event is, under UK consumer law, in breach of contract and that makes the credit card company liable.


Sounds to me you are not a (wo)man that wants to listen. So I'll repeat it in short:
Everything depends on the type of purchase you did. If there is any case of not being able to attend the race because of circumstances that are beyond control, for the sake of this argument let's say a pandemic outbreak of a virus, of either you or the organizing parties, you'll have a hard time getting a refund. No matter how loud you shout about laws and such.