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1958 246 Dino


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#1 Paulleek

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 09:50

I've seen the later versions on the track and in the paddock many times, but I would dearly like to see one in the original 1958 form. Does anyone know if a chassis exists with the body style as driven by Hawthorn, Collins Musso etc.?



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#2 Sterzo

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 10:05

I believe the correct answer to this is "Not yet."



#3 john winfield

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 12:07

Before his assassination in 1793, Marat commented: 'Some well known bearded Author investigated that matter'.

 

...and, in 2003, a Mr. Nye wrote:

 

'These cars' story is pretty much detailed in 'Dino - the Little Ferrari' published by Osprey in 1979, ISBN 0-85045-330-5.

Don't make the mistake of believing that any one serial number indicates the self-same car season after season. In fact Ferrari simply shunted on existing serial numbers - and Customs carnets - from one mechanical assembly and structure to what in some cases was a totally different one the following season.

None of the V6 Dino-engined monoposto chassis built 1957-1959 inclusive are known to have survived.

The surviving genuine cars are 1960 Dino 246/60 all-independently suspended serial '0005' which is displayed without body panelling attached in the Biscaretti Museum, Turin.

Then sister 246/60 '0003' - with 222cm wheelbase-length chassis - which was the display car prepared for the New York Show, kept by Chinetti, sold to JCB, later to Albert Obrist, now in a private collection and preserved complete. Part of its Show preparation involved grinding off excess weld and prettyfying the frame. It is, therefore, NOT quite representative of genuine Ferrari racing shop frame quality in period...which was roughish to very rough.

Then sister 246/60 '0007' which was Phil Hill's 232cm long-wheelbase 1960 Italian GP-wining car fitted with 3-litre V12 engine for Pat Hoare, when it was renumbered in the Ferrari customer list as chassis 'F 0788' - reworked in NZ to 'GTO' (bleeeaaagghhh!) form, retrieved by Neil Corner, restored by Crosthwaite & Gardiner with its original body panels, raced by himself and son Nigel Corner, now sold on from the family after Nigel's 'amazing flying man' accident at Goodwood.

Anthony Bamford - more recently Sir Anthony - commissioned Graypaul Motors of Loughborough (David Clarke's company - David being proud owner of the only unmessed about Ferrari 330P4 to survive) to build a small series of Dino 246 replicas using genuine V6 engines, transmissions and other components he had acquired from Maranello's redundant stores. One of these cars survives today with Robin Lodge in the UK, another is the basis of Corrado Cupellini's alleged 'F2' Dino.

Albert Obrist separately commissioned Ferrari restorer Bob Houghton to build him a Dino 246/60 replica for which even the engine and transmission were sourced new. This car survives today in another private collection. I had the happy task of running it in around Goodwood circuit circa 1995-96 and spent a terrific couple of hours winning the Glover Trophy, Belgian GP, Italian GP...you name it. Imagination is a wunnerful thing.

There were three alternative chassis lengths used in the 1960 team cars - the shortest being 216cm as used with the 1500cc Formula 2 V6 engine and driven by Trips at Monaco 1960 (serial '0011') - and the longest being 232cm which was adopted as the standard 2.4-litre Formula 1 configuration.
Study photos of the cars in use during the 1960 season and the difference in wheelbase lengths becomes apparent.

DCN'

 

Thread https://forums.autos...3/#entry1324119


Edited by john winfield, 30 June 2020 - 12:09.


#4 Paulleek

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 14:54

"Before his assassination in 1793, Marat commented: 'Some well known bearded Author investigated that matter'.

...and, in 2003, a Mr. Nye wrote:

'These cars' story is pretty much detailed in 'Dino... "

Thanks for this John it's really interesting. I find the wheelbase variances fascinating...I seem to remember reading somewhere (probably in Mon Ami Mate) that the car which Collins generally drove had a shorter wheelbase chassis than that of Hawthorn in '58. I'm not sure whether the differences were to do with handling characteristics or simply the stature of each of the drivers.

#5 Steve L

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 15:50

Someone has made a very nice replica of a 1958 spec Dino, Down Under. I'll see if I can find a link to it.

#6 Steve L

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 15:52

https://m.youtube.co...h?v=X6De7oDkBm4

#7 Steve L

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 15:53

https://m.youtube.co...h?v=vUDdTZv4Tgs

#8 Dale Harvey

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 22:41

There is also another that was built much earlier in Sydney by Sam Johnson of JWF Fiberglass fame.

 

Dale.


Edited by Dale Harvey, 30 June 2020 - 22:47.


#9 Paulleek

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 06:22

Thanks Steve & Dale



#10 Sterzo

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:28

My "not yet" answer was clearly wrong; another example of satire falling short of reality. While I do have reservations about replicas, that is a fantastic toy and sounds as good as it looks. I share Paulleek's love of the pre-Fantuzzi bodywork, and indeed built my own replica which was shown on the thread here:

 

https://forums.autos...made-historics/

 

Paul Halford's is, of course, full size, while my wife reminds me mine is only a few inches long.



#11 john winfield

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 09:47

My "not yet" answer was clearly wrong; another example of satire falling short of reality. While I do have reservations about replicas, that is a fantastic toy and sounds as good as it looks. I share Paulleek's love of the pre-Fantuzzi bodywork, and indeed built my own replica which was shown on the thread here:

 

https://forums.autos...made-historics/

 

Paul Halford's is, of course, full size, while my wife reminds me mine is only a few inches long.

 

Yes, but the candid photos show that you have several different ones. And they're all very impressive, even if small. And made of balsa wood.  Does your wife like playing with them?