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Question regarding new constructors in Formula 1 (rules & regulations)


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#1 F1TestCatalunya

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 13:55

Let's say for instance a big company like McDonald's hired designers, engineers and mechanics, designed and built a legal chassis and signed with either Ferrari, Honda, Mercedes or Renault for engines... would FIA allow them into F1?

And if not, why not?

 

 

I have been reading wikipedia and different websites and documents regarding the current day rules and regulations 

that are set for constructors in Formula 1, as well as skimming through the Formula One Constructors' Association wikipedia page.

 

But I can't really find the answers I'm looking for. Namely, what is the process like for a company or manufacturer to request to enter F1?

Are there any prerequisites that you must for example manufacture a certain amount of road cars each year, or be involved in the automotive industry in some capacity beforehand?

 

I know there are a certain amount of FIA license points and grades a driver must have in order to race in F1,

but is it the same for constructors?

 

I guess my question is can any company just apply to enter F1 without having any previous background in motorsport or car manufacturing?

 

 

Thanks for your patience and understanding with a noob  :)



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#2 BRG

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 19:31

I guess my question is can any company just apply to enter F1 without having any previous background in motorsport or car manufacturing?

This is a grey area, shrouded in political fog.  Do the F1 establishment actually want any upstarts horning in on their cosy closed shop?  Currently, it seems they don't.

 

But the evidence suggests that, yes, anyone can apply as and when the FIA say that applications can be made.  We saw the US F1 charade a few years back.  They were an FIA approved new entrant but turned out to more fantasy than reality.  In fact, if a company as substantial as McDonalds did propose to form a team, I imagine the FIA and FOM would jump at the chance.



#3 ray b

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 02:53

red bull is not a car corp

nor is AT

haas makes machine tools

copy point is a beer co

williams makes GP cars only

 

so no as long as they make their own car


Edited by ray b, 09 September 2020 - 02:54.


#4 lustigson

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 07:22

red bull is not a car corp

nor is AT

haas makes machine tools

copy point is a beer co

williams makes GP cars only

 

so no as long as they make their own car

 

Even Ferrari is just a race team that builds road cars to finance their racing. Or at least it was.



#5 PayasYouRace

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 16:31

At the moment you must provide the FIA with evidence that you’re a credible team that can sustain itself. That’s why joke entries like StefanGP never get the green light.

#6 Chubby_Deuce

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 02:58

It's a subjective proposal/review/approval process. You submit a proposal to the FIA based on your financial position, technical resources and long term commercial outlook. Here's an article with the press release from when the FIA formally opened to new applicants back in 2015: https://adamcooperf1...ss-for-2016-17/

 

I'd speculate that your example of a non-motorsports corporation coming in would probably be at a bit of a disadvantage against a racing team or carmaker. The FIA wants a stable entry list and a company that makes their revenue outside of racing or selling cars is liable to leave once the ROI stops adding up. The same can be applied to carmakers I suppose but they're more likely to find value in having a racing team.



#7 gruntguru

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 03:38

It would not make sense for a hamburger chain (or an energy drink corporation) to start an F1 team. Much easier and cheaper to purchase a going concern.



#8 Charlieman

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 10:44

It's helpful to think of an F1 team as a franchise. A submission to join the F1 circus is evaluated for its technical and financial stability. The team is required to enter two cars at every race. In addition to the technical and sporting rules, it is expected to follow informal principles (eg gardening leave for employees changing team) and to respect financial secrecy (eg Concorde Agreement). The team has to design (or commission) its own car chassis -- with an allowance for bought in components from another F1 team.

 

In return, the team is guaranteed TV exposure. Its principal sponsor will get its name mentioned on entry lists etc. If the team earns a top ten place in the constructors' championship for two consecutive years (unclear owing to F1 privacy) it will receive significant prize money. The team gets a small voice in the rule making processes.

 

Haas F1 were initially criticised for its reliance on technology bought in from Ferrari and Dallara. It is the only team which did not exist in one form or another before year 2000. We ought to be more respectful for what it has achieved.



#9 BRG

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 12:46

It's helpful to think of an F1 team as a franchise.

 

It is helpful to use that as a guide, certainly, but they aren't franchises.  Things would be clearer if they were, although it is hardly right that a World Championship be run on such a restrictive basis.  A WC ought to be open to any entrant that meet the rules.  If a country is a member of FIFA and fields a team and wins enough, they can go to the World Cup.  Nobody says, "Sorry Mongolia, but the World Cup is only open to these ten countries".   The Olympics is open to all countries that are members of the movement.  The ICO doesn't say "Sorry, Jamaica, you can't enter the bob-sleigh competition, it is only for countries with snow"

 

Yet the FIA seems content to block possible entrants to F1.  Stefan GP might be a joke, but they should be allowed to enter and make fools of themselves. 



#10 Charlieman

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 10:03

Franchises or not? Ferrari, Williams and McLaren are continuous entities (ie entered by the same legal company for 40 years or so). Alfa Romeo Racing/Sauber is difficult to follow, but probably not continuous. Apart from Haas, all of the other teams entered F1 by purchasing entry rights of a predecessor. At least half of teams in 2020 can be classified as franchises.



#11 Chubby_Deuce

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 17:23

Looks like the entry fee is now up to a staggering $200 million.

 

https://www.autospor...to-join-f1-grid

 

For reference I believe the bond required for an entry back in the 2000s was something like $45 million.