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Toyota hydro engine


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#1 NoForumForOldPole

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 11:37

I just watched:

 

this is interesting I am thinking, 

https://gaadiwaadi.c...n-engine-video/

 

it sounds and drives like a proper engine because it is a proper engine! I cannot watch Formula E and this constant buzzing, is future bright for petrolheads (waterheads) after all? 

 

 

 



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#2 desmo

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 14:55

IC engines behave much the same no matter the fuel. You can't tell the ones using LPG from the petrol fueled ones rolling past. The issue with fueling our fleets with H2 isn't the rolling stock (which wouldn't be terribly technically difficult), it's producing and distributing enough H2.



#3 gruntguru

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 21:47

If H2 does become the fuel of choice, it will be used to power EVs via a fuel cell.



#4 Greg Locock

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 22:56

I haven't tracked the economics of fuel cells for a long time, are they getting into the realms of merely incredibly expensive now?



#5 Greg Locock

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 23:00

One interesting proposal I saw for remote region generated hydrogen is to turn it into ammonia and then store and distribute that. It could either be reformulated to H2 near its use point, or burned directly in gas turbines. Energy density is about half that of hydrocarbons. It's not a good fuel for piston engines, but at a pinch...

 

The obvious application is aircraft and long distance road haulage.


Edited by Greg Locock, 04 May 2021 - 23:16.


#6 Canuck

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 19:08

One of the engineers I interviewed recently had been working on exactly that concept - ammonia as an aircraft fuel.

 

What is the energy input of converting H2 to ammonia and back again?



#7 desmo

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 05:08

Can ammonia be combusted?  With fuel cells, I assume you are lashed to propeller drive and all the shortcomings that entails. 



#8 Greg Locock

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 07:35

Yup, it burns. 

 

The way I read it in a different article, it is hard, but not impossible, to use it in a normal reciprocating engine, and rather easier to burn it in a gas turbine.



#9 Zoe

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 08:12

One interesting proposal I saw for remote region generated hydrogen is to turn it into ammonia and then store and distribute that. 

 

There was a paper in the IEEE Spectrum magazine about ammonia for ships. First test ship is currently being modified to use ammonia.



#10 Kelpiecross

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 06:45

  Back to the subject of hydrogen fuel - I worked with hydrogen years ago on a direct reduction of iron ore by H2 project.   My conclusion - H2 is just plain bloody dangerous.  It is almost impossible to stop leakage from pipe work (because of the small molecule size)  and it is very explosive - the H2 explosions at  Fukushima demonstrate its explosiveness.   As a practical fuel for vehicles it would be very hazardous -  any slight leak in a garage from a car etc.  could (probably would) result in an explosion.  And this is in addition to the 10,000psi fuel tank needed. 

    Ammonia?  I have seen the result of a fairly minor leak of NH3 in a refrigeration plant  - a car fuel tank rupturing after an accident (or whatever) would clear an entire suburb.  

  There are practical reasons  that petrol/diesel/kerosine/alcohol/coal etc. are used as fuels.   

 

  And the reason for this ridiculous search for new fuels?  Bloody Climate Change - which doesn't really exist.   


Edited by Kelpiecross, 07 May 2021 - 06:47.