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NASCAR 7th Generation Cup Car


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#1 Wuzak

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 13:19

After a delay caused by the pandemic, the next generation NASCAR Cup will appear in 2022.

 

The details for the new cars have been released by NASCAR.

 

The big changes include:

 

  • a new tubular steel chassis, built by a single supplier, with a main central section and removeable front and rear sections.
  • new 5 speed sequential transaxle
  • independent rear suspension
  • multi-adjustable dampers
  • bodies to be made of carbon fibre panels
  • bodies to be symmetrical bout centreline - current cars are not
  • flat floor with diffuser
  • 18" aluminium alloy rims (single supply) with centre locking nut
  • bigger brakes
  • wider tyres - 365mm at rear

The engines will remain the same, but with exhausts out both sides, which may change the sound of the cars.

 

https://www.caranddr...next-gen-racer/

 

This seems like a huge change for NASCAR, perhaps the biggest in its history.



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#2 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 13:31

Yeah but is the racing going to be any good. I don't particularly care what they're running. It's NASCAR.



#3 dbltop

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 15:23

This is all about cutting costs, because according to some of the press the owners can't continue to go on the way it is now. Penske net worth 2.5 Billion, Hendrick 1 Billion, Roush 300 Million, Childress, 250 Million. Then the poor, Gibbs, only 60 Mill, and Ganassi at 40 Mill. How will they put food on the table? Having to pay all those nasty pit crews is eating into the profits. 



#4 desmo

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 21:49

After a delay caused by the pandemic, the next generation NASCAR Cup will appear in 2022.

 

The details for the new cars have been released by NASCAR.

 

The big changes include:

 

  • a new tubular steel chassis, built by a single supplier, with a main central section and removeable front and rear sections.
  • new 5 speed sequential transaxle
  • independent rear suspension
  • multi-adjustable dampers
  • bodies to be made of carbon fibre panels
  • bodies to be symmetrical bout centreline - current cars are not
  • flat floor with diffuser
  • 18" aluminium alloy rims (single supply) with centre locking nut
  • bigger brakes
  • wider tyres - 365mm at rear

The engines will remain the same, but with exhausts out both sides, which may change the sound of the cars.

 

https://www.caranddr...next-gen-racer/

 

This seems like a huge change for NASCAR, perhaps the biggest in its history.

Outside of single-sourcing, how is any of that going to cut costs? Besides, what Ross says, it's NASCAR, the cars are just props for the show, they don't matter as long as they get 'er done.



#5 Magoo

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 23:44

I'll have more on this at the website Monday or Tuesday. 



#6 Fat Boy

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Posted 28 May 2021 - 22:06

Outside of single-sourcing, how is any of that going to cut costs? Besides, what Ross says, it's NASCAR, the cars are just props for the show, they don't matter as long as they get 'er done.

Mostly by reducing inventory. The number of 9 inch rear ends owned by your average Cup team is crazy. The same can be said for their chassis', bodies, shocks and transmissions. The idea is that by using 'proper' racing components, they will be able to increase component life and reduce the combinations of what's on hand. A lot of the stranger work-arounds that exist in stock car racing starts with fact that they have to start with things that were not ever meant for racing.

 

Will it work? Who knows?



#7 Fat Boy

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Posted 28 May 2021 - 22:09

P.S. There is no world where a NASCAR centerlock nut takes 43 hours to remove. Worst case scenario is a whizzy wheel and cold chisel, but the car would finish the race.



#8 desmo

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Posted 29 May 2021 - 00:15

Yeah, F1 has levels of engineering stupid baked in that NASCAR couldn't even dream of.



#9 10kDA

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Posted 29 May 2021 - 18:30

Mostly by reducing inventory. The number of 9 inch rear ends owned by your average Cup team is crazy. The same can be said for their chassis', bodies, shocks and transmissions. The idea is that by using 'proper' racing components, they will be able to increase component life and reduce the combinations of what's on hand. A lot of the stranger work-arounds that exist in stock car racing starts with fact that they have to start with things that were not ever meant for racing.

 

Will it work? Who knows?

Precisely why they need to remove the "S" in the organization's name. If it's about costs they're going in the wrong direction. All those supposedly overstressed components would be fine if tire widths were narrower, downforce reduced or eliminated, and engine power reduced. That's where the loads are coming from. Even the most rabid stock car fanboy knows the cars are already re-badged generic rulebook racers, and that the series will never be viewed as a top-line exhibition of technology. So why nudge it ever so slightly in that direction? It's not like Management is fooling anyone.



#10 Wuzak

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Posted 30 May 2021 - 01:56

Precisely why they need to remove the "S" in the organization's name.


That boat sailed a long time ago.

 

All those supposedly overstressed components would be fine if tire widths were narrower, downforce reduced or eliminated, and engine power reduced. That's where the loads are coming from. 


NASCARs haven't ever really been high downforce cars. Engine power is reduced from what it was a few years ago.

 

Running on banked ovals can't be good for the stresses in the cars. Maybe ditch all those from the calendar too?

 

Even the most rabid stock car fanboy knows the cars are already re-badged generic rulebook racers, and that the series will never be viewed as a top-line exhibition of technology. So why nudge it ever so slightly in that direction? It's not like Management is fooling anyone.

What they are doing is hardly state of the art.

 

Australian supercars have been running sequential transaxles and IRS for 7 or 8 years now. They have been using centre-locking hubs since the '90s. 

 

DTM, BTCC and WTCC have using them for longer.

 

IRS has been common in most racing series for a long time too.

 

NASCARs have been using tube frames since the 1970s.



#11 Wuzak

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Posted 30 May 2021 - 02:01

P.S. There is no world where a NASCAR centerlock nut takes 43 hours to remove. Worst case scenario is a whizzy wheel and cold chisel, but the car would finish the race.

 

There is more of an incentive for a NASCAR team to try to remove the nut then and there.

 

F1 only awards points to 10th place. By the time the nut could have been fixed Bottas would have been so far back, so many laps down, getting the car back on track was pointless.

 

NASCAR awards points to all cars that finish (not sure about those that don't). The races are longer and the chance that several cars wreck is higher. So despite being several laps down, a NASCAR team has incentive to get their car going again.

 

Plus NASCAR races are longer.



#12 BRG

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Posted 30 May 2021 - 11:25

Carbon fibre bodywork sounds like a recipe for many,many hours of yellow flag running whilst they vacuum up all the shards after the usual first lap 'big one'.  Then the one shard overlooked puncturing the lead car as they go green leading to next 'big one' .....etc etc etc.

 

In race series where multi car pile-ups are rare, c/f is not an issue, but for NASCAR?



#13 Fat Boy

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Posted 06 June 2021 - 20:19

There is more of an incentive for a NASCAR team to try to remove the nut then and there.

Even after the race at the shop.


Edited by Fat Boy, 06 June 2021 - 20:25.


#14 Fat Boy

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Posted 06 June 2021 - 20:24

Precisely why they need to remove the "S" in the organization's name.

 

OK, Harris. Let's not try to start a holy war here.

 

 

It's not like a Hypercar is really all that hyper...maybe more like a case of moderate ADHD.


Edited by Fat Boy, 06 June 2021 - 20:27.