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Historic Winton


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#1 cooper997

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Posted 29 May 2022 - 12:55

As the last days of an Aussie Autumn nears the season end, The Austin 7 Club's Historic Winton took place at North-Eastern Victorian race circuit, Winton Motor Raceway for the 45th time. A job well done and thoroughly enjoyable weekend for the gathered enthusiasts to celebrate old cars and bikes.

 

The fog hung around both days to add to the atmosphere.

 

So after 2 long days and the drive home, here's a small sample from Saturday practice and the first race start. More will follow as time permits.

 

Nick Mansell's Elite heading into Turn 1

2022-Historic-Winton-01.jpg

 

Adam Bressington's Cooper S got through Turn 1, however Peter Van Summeren's Lotus Cortina was trying to find a line.

2022-Historic-Winton-02.jpg

 

The bikes leave the line...

2022-Historic-Winton-03.jpg

 

 

Stephen



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#2 bradbury west

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Posted 29 May 2022 - 21:24

Nick Mansell's Elite heading into Turn 1
2022-Historic-Winton-01.jpg

Stephen


Proper job. Thanks for posting.
Roger Lund

#3 cooper997

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Posted 29 May 2022 - 22:58

Historic Winton's media liason, Leanne Cutler has forwarded this media release

 

45th Historic Winton is a Success with Twists
 

Historic Winton organised by the Austin 7 Club Inc in association with the HMRAV
28th & 29th May 2022 - Winton Motor Raceway, near Benalla Vic.


The 45th Historic Winton, held this weekend at Winton Motor Raceway (Benalla), was a success but not without challenges.

Scammers trying to sell non-existent livestreaming through Facebook and morning fog were the biggest challenges on the weekend.

Organiser and Austin 7 Club President Len Kerwood said that they worked tirelessly over 48 hours to report, ban and block the scammers on Facebook who were using the event to phish for credit card details.

“Anyone who has been scammed should cancel their credit card immediately and report it to Scamwatch,” Len said. “We spread the word about the scam quickly, alerting everyone on social media and on the track regularly.  This is a problem that almost any event organiser could face these days.”

He said that in regards to foggy conditions, races did not commence until all points of the track were visible according to race rules.

 “It was fortunate that the fog cleared to fine conditions so only a couple of races were delayed each morning,” Len said.

Forty-eight car, motorcycle and sidecar events were held over two days with Historic Winton being the first historic race meet to combine all three race formats 46 years ago.

One highlight was the Sunday Parade that featured anniversary vehicles including 100 Years of Austin 7 and spectator-owned showcase vehicles that caught the eye of organisers.

“The Parade Lap is on the bucket list of many motoring and motorbike enthusiasts as it’s a rare chance to drive or ride the famous Winton Motor Raceway circuit,” Len said.

He said that the Austin 7 Club was proud to have presented its 50th motoring event at Winton Motor Raceway this year and looks forward to holding 46th Historic Winton on 27th and 28th May 2023 (tbc).



#4 cooper997

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Posted 29 May 2022 - 23:31

Peter Donald's 1926 Frazer Nash, that in its much earlier life ran at Brooklands.

2022-Historic-Winton-04.jpg

 

George Morgan's 1932 MG J3 that has Montlhery and Le Mans history also in its earlier life.

2022-Historic-Winton-05.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#5 ntasca

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Posted 30 May 2022 - 01:23

Another great weekend! Look forward to seeing your pics Stephen; my camera didn't get too much use this year. Too busy talking rubbish or tinkering on the cars! Another 15 hours of sleep wouldn't go astray either!



#6 cooper997

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Posted 30 May 2022 - 03:43

Here's the Singer project Nathan.

 

Sunday lunchtime parade laps for the huge array of display cars/trucks/buses, approaching 'Tank' as the cars in the background head through 'Cleavage' (and yes that is a Swallow Seven)

2022-Historic-Winton-06.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#7 cooper997

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Posted 30 May 2022 - 10:35

Sunday morning and racing was delayed until fog started to thin. These 2 photos from 2 different events show it still lingering but at least the flag points could be seen.

 

Laurie Bennett Elfin 600B about to go through Turn 2

2022_Historic_Winton_07.jpg

 

Trevor Montgomery in the ex Davison Alfa Romeo 6C followed by Ty Jarman Dodge special, heading for Turn 2

2022-Historic-Winton-08.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#8 cooper997

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Posted 31 May 2022 - 10:10

Shane Bowden's Prad was doing duel duties in LB class event with SB and Regularity with Glenn Radford. This Sunday morning photo is the Reg.- heading out of Turn 2

2022-Historic-Winton-09.jpg

 

John Lackey's Alan Tomlinson 1939 AGP MG replica also during Sunday's Regularity - going into Turn 2.

2022-Historic-Winton-10.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#9 cooper997

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Posted 31 May 2022 - 22:27

I was looking at this Offy-powered speedcar and it made me wonder if it was a car a good friend of Tony Johns and myself had previously owned (I had only seen a photo though). I asked the young chap with the car, if it was Phil's old car and he wasn't sure. Then a lady appeared and she was able to confirm it was.

 

Phil acquired the 1938 Joe Gardner Offy from the Mark Dees estate and it went to Alan Telfer in late 2007. I messaged Phil with a photo of his old car there and then. Back came a response that included, "Wow... I hope he has more luck getting it going than I did at Winton. " Alas, Alan was already having starting issues when I took the snaps.

 

2022-Historic-Winton-11.jpg

 

2022-Historic-Winton-12.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#10 cooper997

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 06:42

Sunday morning and the fog has moved on. Both taken from Turn 2

 

Richard Davison Ralt RT4 (about 'as new' as Historic Winton gets)

2022-Historic-Winton-13.jpg

 

Ian Ross Osella PA5

2022-Historic-Winton-14.jpg

 

 

Stephen


Edited by cooper997, 01 June 2022 - 06:44.


#11 lyntonh

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 07:03

F7-D1-F771-5-AE3-4395-968-A-452432552-FC

There's a new generation of the Scarf in the Sulman Singer as James Reid had his first outing at Historic Winton 2022.



#12 lyntonh

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 07:17

58-A56562-9-AF1-4-D44-BBC8-F297-F1-D8-D9

 

Jim 'Stumpy' Russell won easily in the Saturday afternoon race, but was a two lap DNF in the Lou Molina five lapper on Sunday, and a DNS in the handicap.



#13 Shane Bowden

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 22:44

58-A56562-9-AF1-4-D44-BBC8-F297-F1-D8-D9

 

Jim 'Stumpy' Russell won easily in the Saturday afternoon race, but was a two lap DNF in the Lou Molina five lapper on Sunday, and a DNS in the handicap.

 

Broken diff



#14 cooper997

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Posted 02 June 2022 - 01:43

I had a couple of good chats with Dick Willis on both days. He wasn't racing this year, however he had his recently completed Ian Mountain Peugeot special on display at Historic Winton. A credit to his talents and those who have helped him get the car going for the first time in 67 years.

 

On the Friday, Dick (driving from Coffs Harbour) missed the Historic Winton turn off and ended up in Seymour closer to Melbourne (further down the same Hume Highway for those overseas). Seriously though it was pre-arranged to catch up with Ian's now 89yo brother, Ken to show him the restored car at Seymour. Ken had helped with pieces of the car's history during restoration.

 

This photo supplied by Dick shows himself on LH wheel (right of screen) and Ken Mountain on the other side.

2022-Historic-Winton-IKM-Seymour-2.jpg .

 

The IKM also featured prominently in this year's event programme.

2022-Historic-Winton-IKM-programme.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#15 cooper997

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Posted 02 June 2022 - 11:19

Sunday morning Regularity #2 'Tank' corner

 

Bill Hemming Elfin Mallala and Andrew Church MG TC (ex Molina)

2022-Historic-Winton-15.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#16 Ray Bell

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Posted 02 June 2022 - 22:23

Originally posted by cooper997
I had a couple of good chats with Dick Willis on both days. He wasn't racing this year, however he had his recently completed Ian Mountain Peugeot special on display at Historic Winton. A credit to his talents and those who have helped him get the car going for the first time in 67 years.
 
On the Friday, Dick (driving from Coffs Harbour) missed the Historic Winton turn off and ended up in Seymour closer to Melbourne (further down the same Hume Highway for those overseas). Seriously though it was pre-arranged to catch up with Ian's now 89yo brother, Ken to show him the restored car at Seymour. Ken had helped with pieces of the car's history during restoration.
 
This photo supplied by Dick shows himself on LH wheel (right of screen) and Ken Mountain on the other side.
2022-Historic-Winton-IKM-Seymour-2.jpg


How great it is to see this car going again...

Here's the story I wrote about it just over twenty years ago:

Fast that’s Past – Ian Mountain’s Peugeot Special


Having previously prepared and raced a very nice Ford V8, Ian Mountain built this rapid successor to the finest detail. Little did he know what lay ahead.

BARRY HUDSON well remembers the day he met Ian Mountain. It was in a barber shop in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs. He also remembers going to Rob Roy hillclimb and leaving ‘by the back way,’ which included running up the climb itself. “That was about 32 seconds,” said Mountain to his excited passenger after completing the all-important climb.

Barry pursued a trade working in sheet metal as his friendship with Mountain flourished, so he was a good lad to have around as the building of a new car was to become the centre of the life of the energetic car salesman.

While Ian Mountain had done the training to become a Civil Engineer, he had spent time selling Peugeots for Canada Car & Cycle Co. in Melbourne and took on a job which saw him travelling all over Victoria and making handsome commissions as he took orders for a car becoming rapidly more popular.

As he looked over the car, Ian saw some very advanced attributes. Ken Mountain, his brother, recalls him discussing the hemispherical combustion chambers achieved without overhead camshafts, the crossflow head, the lightness of the alloy cylinder head and other points.

This was also a time of change in racing car construction. Formula 1 was going to downsize heavily, 500cc Formula 3 cars were staggeringly fast, more than before were looking beyond the Ford V8 when it came to powering their Specials as the MG TC became the basis of more and more very rapid cars.

So the seeds were sewn for the IKM (Ian Kenneth Mountain) Peugeot Special. It was to take shape in a suburban garage and driveway, based on a simple ladder chassis of light gauge round tube. It would look hefty from it s large (2.75”- 70mm) diameter, but in fact the chassis was quite light. The front suspension was essentially Peugeot 203 and the rear end featured a de Dion suspension as then favoured by the best of the F1 cars overseas.

The Peugeot’s transverse leaf spring was bracketed into the fabricated crossmember in a close approximation of the heavy steel casting in the sturdy little sedans. But instead of the top wishbones being the arms of heavy lever-type dampers, Mountain fabricated tubular wishbones and mounted them on towers of liberally drilled steel sheet. Between the arms lay a similar type of bracketing to mount the top ends of tubular dampers that angled out to the end of the spring.

At the rear there were folded steel towers to mount the short trailing arms that aided the quarter elliptic springs in locating the de Dion tube and its hub carriers. Initially, the lateral location of the rear end was also left to the springs.

Four crossmembers join the main chassis rails, the front one being that with the spring mount built into it and also mounting the Peugeot steering rack, while the others were simple tubes – one behind the gearbox and two at the rear with mounts for the differential welded to them. Gussets at the joints gave added rigidity.

The main tubes curved alongside the engine section, rising at the front to be the right height for the crossmember and being flat and close to the ground at the rear beneath the rear suspension.

The engine and gearbox were installed at an angle to allow a more central seating position behind the 203 steering wheel. The gearlever location was tailored to suit.

Watching her fiancé fabricating this chassis was a young woman keen to help. She had been with Ian when he competed in sailing races, and when he raced motorcycles. Then she’d been at his side with the Ford V8 racer too, and was there when Ian drove the Diana Davison TC Special at Albert Park while he was without a car.

Ian would later marry this long-time sweetheart, the stunningly attractive Laurel, but at this time she spent most of her time at the Mountain family home as he worked on the chassis and other parts of the project.

Today it is still a clear vision in her mind. “I can see the frame as he welded it together,” Laurel says, and delightfully adds her impression of the progress being made, of the life coming into being, “then it came up onto its wheels…”

Her own contribution bore fruit as she took a paintbrush in hand and helped paint the frames. As she helped, the mind of Barry Hudson could not help but allow him to be totally smitten by the tall, slim lady who would find so much joy and grief in this project.

Others helped too, but still the construction covered a lengthy period. Mountain was fastidious, frequently being diverted to tangents that made for a more complete and professional whole, but tended to add days, weeks and months to the construction time.

While the chassis work was being done, the engine was also being prepared, the adaptation of an MG TC gearbox and modification of its remote control was undertaken and myriad other associated jobs done.

A significant piece of the car was the huge magnesium supercharger that was mounted on a frame in front of the front suspension. A Wade R020, this unit was built for a Cisitalia, but left over at the works in England when that manufacturer folded. Ian McDowell was in England and learned of its presence, rang Ian to inform him and then effected the purchase and transport to Australia.

A huge 2 3/16” SU carburetor was to feed the Shell M racing fuel to this well-ribbed blower, with Hudson responsible for the sheet metal brackets that supported it and the manifolding that was remade twice during the development stages. He made these while on National Service, the manifold incorporating a blowoff valve.

As time progressed, more tubular frames took shape and were added to the chassis. A hoop ahead of the cockpit carried the steering column, another just forward of the diff supported the one-piece aluminium seat that was lined with ‘Dunlopillo’ foam and finished with vinyl. Four lighter hoops provided the basic body mounting frame, Hudson making these up to provide the line of the slim, low profile and expecting to carry on and make the body.

At one stage the Jack Brabham Redex Special sat alongside the car, Jack being billeted at the Mountain home when in town to race at Altona. Barry remembers Ian saying, on seeing this, “We should have built a spaceframe…” With the project already three years down the track, there was no turning back. Perhaps, however, Ian had further ideas in the back of his mind.

With the progress of time, Ian actually decided on the alternative route for the body, having Neil Coleman do the job at his North Melbourne workshop. Even so, Ian’s declaration to Barry that Neil would build it in a week failed to be be realised, the job taking the panel beater three weeks. Barry still had to create the bulge in the bonnet to clear the Scintella Vertex magneto that sat on an extended mount in order to clear the manifold.

Time really did drag along. As Barry says, each part of the car was finished to pedantic detail.

Not for Ian to rely on the standard 1290cc Peugeot engine, and being aware of the coming 403 model and its larger 1468cc capacity, Ian had a block modified and larger sleeves and special Rolloy pistons made to take the engine out to 1490cc.

The supercharger was chain driven from the front of the crankshaft, a variety of sprockets allowing different pressures to be used. Initially a combination of 6:1 compression with the blower at 6psi was used. The chain drive also ran the water pump, and a harmonic balancer was fitted.

Internally the engine was thoroughly polished – crank, rods etc, while Ian polished the ports by hand (or finger, at least) using sandpaper. The rocker gear was lightened in this polishing spree, special exhaust valves were fitted, but many of the original components – valve springs etc – were retained.

The Peugeot parts were, unusually, brand new. These were provided, along with a special high volume fuel pump, by Canada Car and Cycle Co for their star salesman to help promote the marque.

The differential chosen was the venerable Ford V8 3.75:1 unit, fitted with cast alloy side plates on the housing and adapted for the independent suspension. Chrysler pot-type joints adorned each end of the halfshafts to take the drive to the wheels.

The de Dion tube had a rotating joint in the middle with phenolic resin friction pads. The very first test showed that this needed to be locked up solid.

Stopping was done by MG TC brakes fitted with Alfin drums, while TC wheel hubs were laced to FJ Holden rims to give a decent sized wheel (for the time) to mount the Dunlop racing tyres that graced very few cars of the era.

A big 22-gallon fuel tank was made from steel, baffled to avoid surge, and fitted over the rear end.

So, with a gestation period lasting so long, the car’s appearance was well received. We mentioned pedantic detail? Reports of the day glowed with the obvious professionalism of the car’s finish. Now it was time to see what the instruments on that polished alloy panel in front of the driver – there was a tacho, temperature gauges for water and oil and an oil pressure gauge.

Testing took place on the Geelong Road, a favourite haunt of Melbourne’s racing set. Trialled without the body to begin with, Ian put it through its paces there before going on to run at the Beveridge hillclimb. This was a dirt climb and resulted in the failure of a pot joint because a pencil rubber had found its way into the joint!

At Templestowe hillclimb Ian did a 64s run, ‘not bad for a teething run’ according to Australian Motor Sport. Then came the first race meeting for the car, Fisherman’s Bend, where a fuel distribution problem manifested itself and led to that final manifold change. Though it gave trouble, the car finished both races in which it was entered.

The next event was the Australian Grand Prix, held at Southport on November 7, 1954 on the daunting 9.7km circuit that lay among the dairy farms to the west of Chevron Island.

This was a special occasion for other reasons, however. The engagement period of Ian Mountain and Laurel Duguid was now over, they were married at a time convenient to allow a honeymoon that embraced the Grand Prix.

Barry Hudson was not a part of this outing, but his comments help explain how Ian was able to assemble a team to help him in the event. “Ian attracted the layabouts and was able to use them,” he told me.

The car was rather less successful than the honeymoon. While the new bride was everything Ian could have wanted, the car was less so. It performed fairly well for such an untried car, but the radiator drain was chafing on the bodywork on this rough circuit and the car lost too much coolant.

Its lap time, however, showed some potential. 4:22.7, compared to the Wylie Javelin’s 4:24.6 and Doug Whiteford in Black Bess on 4:17.8. Top speed was calculated at 118mph (189.8kmh), and acceleration out of the corners was a strong point.

This was put right over the year-end holiday period and the car was made ready for the Gnoo Blas meeting at the end of January. Here it again showed plenty of potential, but this was another dangerous and narrow public road course.

Unfortunately Ian found the limits of the car in the wrong place and plunged off the road and through a barbed wire fence. Though the first ones on the scene found him alive, he died before he reached the Orange Base Hospital.


A distraught widow and a shattered car had to make their way back to Melbourne, John Cummins taking on the job of driving the 203 tow car with the wreck on the trailer for that journey. He had witnessed the accident and knew the horror of it, but for Ian’s brother, Ken, there was still life in the IKM Special.

Carefully extracting the photo album of the car’s construction from his sister in law (“They were cagey about it, they didn’t want to hurt my feelings,” Laurel recalls), he and Don Olsen set about the task of rebuilding – as a tribute to Ian, who had willed the car to Ken.

But Ken had no mechanical aptitude. The job was abandoned and the remains sold to Harry Firth. The body was to lay in the Neil Coleman workshop for many years, the balance of the car to lie in state in Firth’s workshop.

Save for the supercharger, which was bolted to the engine of a Torana run by the HDT as a Sports Sedan for a short time, and then in rallycross. Later it would be loaned out and damaged.

Ian Tate ultimately bought the package from his employer, and it joined a nice collection of cars Ian has restored or is going to. Repairs to the supercharger are planned, and Ian seems to treat this car as the pride of his little collection.

For Laurel Mountain, now remarried, the time of hating the car has now passed. Beyond all else, she feels it’s important that the story of her late husband’s construction of it be told because it was built in a time that’s now forgotten.

It was an era of shortages and difficulties, of change and compromise. Yet through that Ian Mountain forged ahead to build a car that looked good and performed well. Even though he entertained the idea of selling the car when a prominent Sydney driver made overtures, it was still literally in his hands till the day he died.

In this era, cars would spring up from many a suburban garage made from components the owner felt likely to produce a performance that would thrill them. Winning wasn’t always the first thought on their minds like today.

Probably it is Laurel’s words that best sum up this story: “They followed their dreams!”



#17 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 03 June 2022 - 02:35

Small correction Ray, Ford V8s are 4.11 ratio. A model is 3 .78. 



#18 Dick Willis

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Posted 03 June 2022 - 04:20

How great it is to see this car going again...

Here's the story I wrote about it just over twenty years ago:
 

 

Ray, that was a great story you wrote on the IKM way back then, you obviously did a lot of research and spoke to a lot of connected people which helped me enormously in the restoration. For a long time I had been intrigued by the tragic story of the car and had followed it's progress with Ian Tate so when the opportunity arose 17 months ago for me to be able to complete the restoration I accepted it gladly as I believed the car needed to be restored. When the car made it's debut in 1954 there many favourable comments made about it's standard of finish and the ingenuity of it's design so I am happy that at last enthusiasts have been able, as at Winton, to appreciate this great car.



#19 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 June 2022 - 06:20

My congratulations on owning a car, as you describe it, so worthwhile restoring. The design of the car, the tragic history of both the car and its owner, the build being finished - as described by Barry Hudson - to pedantic levels, it just had to be done. As you rightly say, so people can see and appreciate it.

 

It's almost worth me taking a trip to Coffs to look at it...

 

Or will it be at a Morgan Park some time?



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#20 cooper997

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Posted 03 June 2022 - 09:36

Ray's IKM feature was originally published in issue 68 Motor Racing Australia magazine.

 

 

Here's a snap from a foggy Historic Winton.

2022-Historic-Winton-16.jpg

 

(second photo edited in after postimage co-operation)

2022-Historic-Winton-17.jpg

 

 

Stephen


Edited by cooper997, 04 June 2022 - 01:48.


#21 Ray Bell

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Posted 03 June 2022 - 22:53

Originally posted by cooper997
Ray's IKM feature was originally published in issue 68 Motor Racing Australia magazine.
 
 
Here's a snap from a foggy Historic Winton.

2022-Historic-Winton-16.jpg


2022-Historic-Winton-17.jpg

At least in a more appropriate size without the advert...

And the story came with a couple of pictures. The other thing I should have suggested was that maybe John Medley can tell the story of the conversation between all the blokes who remembered the meeting at Gnoo Blas and the associations with the IKM and Ian Mountain.





.

Edited by Ray Bell, 04 June 2022 - 08:57.


#22 Dick Willis

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Posted 04 June 2022 - 01:47

Nice aspect for the pic Stephen, shows it's nice rear end. I had a busy time at Winton with admirers of he car, as in the pic, me on the left in the cap discussing the IKM of course. My interest in the car was really rekindled at a Gnoo Blas commemoration in the mid 1990s, John Medley was there and several other eminent enthusiasts, some of whom had been there on that fateful day.     At that time, I had no idea of the whereabouts of the car.


At least in a more appropriate size without the advert...

And the story came with a couple of pictures. The other thing I should have suggested was that maybe John Medley can tell the story of the conversation between all the blokes who remembered the meeting at Gnoo Blas and the associations with the IKM and Ian Mountain.



#23 cooper997

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Posted 04 June 2022 - 02:07

Dick, I've used an opposite side variant of the photo for my MCR magazine Historic Winton feature.

 

 

Sunday morning race, Norm Falkiner Stanguellini Formula Junior just out of the sweeper heading for tank corner

2022-Historic-Winton-18.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#24 cooper997

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Posted 04 June 2022 - 06:14

Sunday morning Regularity 2 - Alan Tidbury ex Bill Craig Cooper MkV, that Bil Pile slotted a Climax in..

2022-Historic-Winton-19.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#25 cooper997

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Posted 04 June 2022 - 11:01

Saturday Group S practice/quali Perry Spiridis Corvette at Turn 1

2022-Historic-Winton-20.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#26 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 June 2022 - 11:08

That's a nice-looking jigger...

 

And it's interesting the way he's put the pipes out the sides, especially with the potential for setting fibreglass on fire.

 

Nevertheless, I'm sure the more timid Sprite racers gave it a wide berth for fear of being run over.



#27 cooper997

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Posted 05 June 2022 - 01:12

Ray, that was one of 4 or 5 Corvettes having a run and sidepipes were pretty much part of their dna. The color and American Racing (or that style) wheel does compliment the Spiridis car.

 

One or 2 of the Corvettes managed to stay at the pointy end of the field against the more nimble Lotus Super Seven, Alfetta GTV and Sprite/Midgets in the grunt v nimbleness stakes. However the Byrne Lotus won out..

 

Sunday lunchtime Group S race

2022-Historic-Winton-21.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#28 cooper997

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Posted 05 June 2022 - 10:24

A huge variety of vintage & classics during Sunday's lunchtime parade did some slow laps for 20 minutes.

 

The baby Austins at the head of the parade.

2022-Historic-Winton-22.jpg

 

2022-Historic-Winton-23.jpg

(these 2 snaps show just a small selection)

 

 

Stephen



#29 cooper997

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Posted 06 June 2022 - 00:38

Sunday's George Coad Memorial

 

Back markers, Samantha Dymond Lola and Mal Reid Prad Holden.

2022-Historic-Winton-24.jpg

 

Shane Bowden Prad sports leads Russell Budge Zephsca and Brian Simpson Cooper MkIX

2022-Historic-Winton-25.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#30 cooper997

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Posted 07 June 2022 - 22:10

Saturday afternoon Group N touring cars race, Phil Barrow FJ Holden at the start of the esses.

 

2022-Historic-Winton-26.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#31 cooper997

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Posted 08 June 2022 - 03:00

Scott Whittaker JWF Milano GT2 in Sunday's Event 35 M & O Sports and Racing. With the background showing a rare part of the weekend when positions were swapped as Laurie Bennett's red Elfin 600B had to watch the back of Paul Faulkner's Brabham BT29. The pair Scott chased all weekend.

 

2022-Historic-Winton-27.jpg

 

 

Stephen


Edited by cooper997, 08 June 2022 - 03:01.


#32 cooper997

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Posted 08 June 2022 - 10:05

Saturday afternoon Group N race - revs are up & clutch pedals are out.

 

2022-Historic-Winton-28.jpg

 

 

 

Stephen



#33 cooper997

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Posted 09 June 2022 - 02:39

Sunday morning Event 30 Formula Ford... Nick Bennett Elfin 600B leads the field with Will Faulkner Crossle 32F and Johnny Greig Reynard 82 directly behind.

 

2022-Historic-Winton-29.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#34 cooper997

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Posted 10 June 2022 - 08:35

Another foggy Sunday morning snap... Event 21 Grant Walker Lotus 18 FJ at Turn 2

 

2022-Historic-Winton-30.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#35 cooper997

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Posted 11 June 2022 - 09:12

Penrite's Cooper MkV poking out from their garages.

 

2022-Historic-Winton-35.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#36 10kDA

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Posted 11 June 2022 - 20:01

Great pics! Thanks for posting.



#37 10kDA

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Posted 11 June 2022 - 20:06

A huge variety of vintage & classics during Sunday's lunchtime parade did some slow laps for 20 minutes.

 

The baby Austins at the head of the parade.

 

 

2022-Historic-Winton-23.jpg

(these 2 snaps show just a small selection)

 

 

Stephen

 

What kind of lap times did the Flxibles set?



#38 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 June 2022 - 22:42

They should have been slower than the Chrysler Royal ambulance...

 

And probably the Studebaker Lark ambulance, but quicker than the old International.



#39 cooper997

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Posted 12 June 2022 - 02:12

Those parade laps on Sunday had no fastest times of the day, about 5 laps in 20 minutes.

 

 

Displayed in the Austin 7 Exhibition, ex Nigel Tait racer built in the 60s when he was also involved with Repco Brabham Engines.

2022-Historic-Winton-31.jpg

 

2022-Historic-Winton-34.jpg

 

more info on this car here...

https://forums.autos...1928/?p=9389307

 

 

Stephen



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#40 cooper997

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Posted 13 June 2022 - 09:42

Nigel Tait still out running his Lolita in Regularity

 

2022-Historic-Winton-36.jpg

 

Greg Prunster's Mk1 Sprite in Sunday's Group S race

2022-Historic-Winton-37.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#41 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 14 June 2022 - 04:32

What kind of lap times did the Flxibles set?

The question is how much oil did the Jag spray on the track?



#42 cooper997

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Posted 14 June 2022 - 22:32

I was looking at this teardrop's talented artwork... when a short distance away I noticed a mostly hidden (by a caravan), slab back car on a trailer. .

2022-Historic-Winton-38.jpg

 

As I walked closer and could see more, it wasn't what I expected.

2022-Historic-Winton-39.jpg

 

I mentioned to the gent trying to unload it... "Is this about a 1950 Bond Minicar built by Laurie Bond?" As we stood in North-Eastern Victoria far from the car's origins, unexpected by me, he responded... "It's 1948 and Laurie Bond was my father."

 

He also made mention his son had a Bond under restoration. But I never did get his christian name as he unloaded and headed off for the display area (and ultimately a run in the lunchtime parade laps).

 

So like so many Historic meetings around the globe you never know what you will stumble upon.

 

The teardrops are being built new in nearby Benalla (murals optional)

 

 

 

Stephen

 

 



#43 Ray Bell

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Posted 14 June 2022 - 23:09

They were also being built at nearby Strathmerton a few years ago...

 

Though that place, which specialised in converting small buses to motorhomes, probably now has more work than it can handle with the buses.



#44 cooper997

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Posted 16 June 2022 - 05:07

Saturday afternoon Regularity 1 at the esses...

 

George Taylor (over from Tasmania) 1927 Austin 7 CFB Spl

2022-Historic-Winton-41.jpg

 

Tim Jackson 1932 Austin 7

2022-Historic-Winton-42.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#45 cooper997

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Posted 16 June 2022 - 08:39

Adam Bressington's Cooper S is shown in the second photo of post 1. The Bressington/Midel SU social media page has uploaded footage from Sunday afternoon's final Group N Touring Car race.

 

Visit here for a virtual run around Winton here...

https://www.facebook...22340784561220/

 

and if you scroll through their page you'll find more Historic Winton related posts.

 

 

Stephen



#46 cooper997

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Posted 17 June 2022 - 10:30

John Shuttle's Jaguar Mk2

2022-Historic-Winton-43.jpg

 

Cooper S battle.... Richard Hill chases Adam Bressington

2022-Historic-Winton-44.jpg

 

 

Stephen



#47 cooper997

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Posted 19 June 2022 - 09:16

The efforts of 'Albert & Phillip' Youtube channel brings comprehensive coverage of 2022 Historic Winton. Sit back and enjoy.

 

 

 

Stephen