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Unfair to Sergio


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#1 Barry Boor

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Posted 01 August 2022 - 19:37

Fear not, friends, I am not introducing a topic connected with modern F.1......

 

I am feeling a tad sad (or should that be 'a sad tad'?) because I have searched several racing driver biography sites, including our own Darren Galpin's superb offering, and on none of them do I find the fact that Sergio Sighinolfi ever drove in Grand Prix.

 

I know that 1952 was a Formula 2 season but nonetheless for that, the Modena Grand Prix WAS a Grand Prix.

 

Signor Sighinolfi was entered in a works Ferrari 500 and was 6th fastest in practice, less than 3 seconds slower than Ascari.

 

I assume that he started the race although I realise that he didn't finish it due to Ascari's car suffering an oil system problem, whereupon Sergio was called in for Alberto to take over his car.  Ascari completed 18 laps before retiring so I guess Sighinolfi was called in around lap 20.

 

Surely this would warrant being included in the list of Grand Prix drivers, even though he never got another chance?  There is only one thing worse than being ignored......

 

As an aside, measured to a tenth of a second, Villoresi and Gonzalez dead-heated, although the win was given to the Ferrari from the Argentine's Maserati.

 

Is there a photo somewhere?



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#2 Rob Miller

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Posted 01 August 2022 - 20:45

The sad fact is that if the race is not a World Championship round they are mostly ignored. Jean Behra is glossed over because he never won a WC race.

Sergio did however finish 6th in the 1955 Mille Miglia in a Ferrari.

#3 ReWind

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Posted 01 August 2022 - 20:55

Not ignored.



#4 Roger Clark

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Posted 02 August 2022 - 10:20

Sighinolfi got the drive because Mike Hawthorn testing a Ferrari for the first time, tried a Cooper. mixed up his braking points and put himself in hospital.  Autosport says that Sighinolfi had an excellent debut, finishing third.  No mention of Ascari taking over! The black Book shows villoresi's time as 1:51'21.8", Gonzalez' as 1:51'49.6" but this is probably an error.  Autocourse says that Lampredi fainted as the cars crossed the finishing line.

 

It is a matter of opinion whether a 142 mile race is a Grand Prix, even if the words are in the title.



#5 Tim Murray

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Posted 02 August 2022 - 10:55

The black Book shows Villoresi’s time as 1:51'21.8", Gonzalez' as 1:51'49.6" but this is probably an error.

My (first edition) copy has Villoresi and Gonzalez on 1:51’21.0”, with Sighinolfi/Ascari on 1:51’49.6”. Presumably the error crept into the second edition.

Sighinolfi also raced in that year’s Syracuse and Naples GPs in a Scuderia Marzotto Ferrari, but of course like the Modena GP these were non-championship races.

#6 Barry Boor

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Posted 02 August 2022 - 11:09

I think that to question any race that was given a title of Grand Prix seems a little unfair given that the race lasted not far short of 2 hours. What  criteria do we use to differentiate between a Grand Prix and something that was just a motor race?

 

On that basis, there has rarely been a true Grand Prix for a very long time or so Jenks would have you believe.



#7 Roger Clark

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Posted 02 August 2022 - 11:59

The second and third editions of the Black Book both have the times I quoted.  Autosport and The Autocar have Villoresi on 21.0", Gonzalez on 2.8".  The Motor only says that Villoresi was four-fifths ahead.  Autocourse has them both on 21.0".  Settant'Anni di Gare Automobilistiche in Italia has Villoresi on 21.0", Gonzalez on 04.0" and 1 lap behind.



#8 uechtel

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Posted 02 August 2022 - 15:16

I think that to question any race that was given a title of Grand Prix seems a little unfair given that the race lasted not far short of 2 hours. What  criteria do we use to differentiate between a Grand Prix and something that was just a motor race?

 

On that basis, there has rarely been a true Grand Prix for a very long time or so Jenks would have you believe.

 


Well, to *my* definition, the 'proper' Grands Prix were those fully sanctioned as such by the FIA (AIACR previously) and ran strictly according to the "whole" current "International Grand Prix Formula (1/2)" (that is including non-technical parameters like race length, duration etc.). In this the FIA/AIACR did only specify the terms of participation for the 'true' International Grands Prix (GP of Italy, France, Germany etc. which had status as the Grandes Epreuves). All the other races were 'Formula Libre', as the organizers were free to chose the rules for their event. This could mean, that they would adopt the technical specifications of that official Formula, but they could also decide otherwise.

 

Or would you really regard drivers in the Luxembourg GP of 1950 - a sports car race - as 'Grand Prix' drivers?



#9 JoBo

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Posted 03 August 2022 - 08:09

The sad fact is that if the race is not a World Championship round they are mostly ignored. Jean Behra is glossed over because he never won a WC race.

Sergio did however finish 6th in the 1955 Mille Miglia in a Ferrari.


Sorry to correct you: Behra won - together with Fangio - the 12 Hrs of Sebring 1957 in a Maserati 450S.
He also won - together with Moss - the 1000 km race on the Nürburgring in 1956 in a Maserati 300S.