Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Alfadan I4 engine


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 TDIMeister

TDIMeister
  • Member

  • 310 posts
  • Joined: January 06

Posted 21 November 2022 - 02:21

So there's yet another engine startup who claims to have the next big thing - this being a big displacement I4 engine that solves the bane of this type of engine: secondary imbalance as one gets bigger.

 

The below videos and patents by the company show their concept to be a variation of the Scotch Yoke or "Bourque" engine done as in inline 4..

 

(I like this channel, BTW, it's one of the better ones IMO).

 

https://patents.goog...US10012145B1/en

https://patents.goog...US10378578B1/en

https://patents.goog...US11098750B2/en

https://patentimages...020014698A1.pdf

 

The CEO wisely and astutely said that they won't disclose their secret sauce, otherwise everyone will copy it - patents or not. So, I think the patents and reference to the Scotch Yoke / Bourque engine are all a ruse - a red-herring - a canard - from what they're actually doing because the Scotch Yoke / Bourque engine has intractable issues with the sliding line contact at the crank journal. It is my speculation that they are working much more like something like the below. I showed a video by this creator before. He's been making a few new videos since that time making minor modifications and refinements since.

 

Discuss!

 

PS: For full disclosure, I have been working for a number of years separately on a type of sinusoidal mechanism engine, a new prechamber design, and a non-air-breathing engine (submitted a WPT patent application in 2020 for the last) but that's all I'm willing to disclose.  ;)

 

Edit: There's a funny line from the movie The Departed (2006) starring Jack Nicholson, Matt Damon and others that I think is fitting: "My theory on feds is that they're like mushrooms; Feed 'em sh!t and keep 'em in the dark."  :rotfl:


Edited by TDIMeister, 21 November 2022 - 03:02.


Advertisement

#2 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 6,179 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 21 November 2022 - 05:01

I think you mean the Bourke engine.I had a bit of correspondence with a couple of entertaining enthusiasts , one of whom assured me he'd have it in production within 2 years. 

 

In a Bourke engine how do the piston rings get lubricated?


Edited by Greg Locock, 21 November 2022 - 05:03.


#3 TDIMeister

TDIMeister
  • Member

  • 310 posts
  • Joined: January 06

Posted 21 November 2022 - 06:05

Yes, sorry, my typo error. I am indeed referring to the Bourke engine.

#4 GreenMachine

GreenMachine
  • Member

  • 2,151 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 21 November 2022 - 08:09

I am quite sure this has been discussed here in the not-so-distant past, but putting 'alfadan' in the search box produced a nil result  :confused:



#5 desmo

desmo
  • Tech Forum Host

  • 25,878 posts
  • Joined: January 00

Posted 21 November 2022 - 14:43

Color me cynical but nobody who has access to enough money will in a million years be stupid enough to throw resources into the money pit of trying to develop this "mystery" design with no (even claimed!) efficiency upsides. You know they've pitched this to the OEMs and they didn't take the bait. By the time something like this is in the open public on the internet "looking for individual investors" phase (keeping the actual concept secret and unpatented is a particularly cynically bold and flagrant red flag) , it means all the smart money has already run screaming away and they are desperately chasing easy, stupid money before they inevitably throw in the towel permanently. This is therefore a dead concept walking, in its terminal phase, at this point only looking for naïve marks to fleece before they move on to the next "investor" scam. No I didn't watch the pitches, they are essentially all the same. There will be no further major design developments in piston ICEs again, the design has already reached its logical and developmental endpoints.



#6 TDIMeister

TDIMeister
  • Member

  • 310 posts
  • Joined: January 06

Posted 22 November 2022 - 22:04

Color me cynical but nobody who has access to enough money will in a million years be stupid enough to throw resources into the money pit of trying to develop this "mystery" design with no (even claimed!) efficiency upsides. You know they've pitched this to the OEMs and they didn't take the bait. By the time something like this is in the open public on the internet "looking for individual investors" phase (keeping the actual concept secret and unpatented is a particularly cynically bold and flagrant red flag) , it means all the smart money has already run screaming away and they are desperately chasing easy, stupid money before they inevitably throw in the towel permanently. This is therefore a dead concept walking, in its terminal phase, at this point only looking for naïve marks to fleece before they move on to the next "investor" scam. No I didn't watch the pitches, they are essentially all the same. There will be no further major design developments in piston ICEs again, the design has already reached its logical and developmental endpoints.

Yeesh - cynical indeed! :)



#7 GregThomas

GregThomas
  • Member

  • 147 posts
  • Joined: January 22

Posted 23 November 2022 - 06:18

Yeesh - cynical indeed! :)

But probably true - as it relates to fourstrokes.



#8 PJGD

PJGD
  • Member

  • 134 posts
  • Joined: April 04

Posted 24 November 2022 - 00:57

"There will be no further major design developments in piston ICEs again, the design has already reached its logical and developmental endpoints".

 

 

This may be true for light duty vehicles, but is not true for commercial applications.  For example, Cummins and Daimler have recently joined forces to develop a new medium duty commercial vehicle engine.  Also, there are plenty of off-road applications that will be difficult to electrify and a lot of thought is being given to how they might be adapted to operate on various low carbon fuels in the future.  This is likely to lead to some unique or less common solutions such as VCR and other relatively novel features.  Note: I am not expecting the Alfadan engine to be among the future commercial engines.



#9 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 6,179 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 24 November 2022 - 04:31

Agricultural tractors seem to me to be a biggish problem. When you are ploughing you often have a bowser at the side of the field, 200 hp continuous is a big electrical load for 12 hours a day. Especially if you are out in the sticks.



#10 GregThomas

GregThomas
  • Member

  • 147 posts
  • Joined: January 22

Posted 24 November 2022 - 06:48

Amazingly we had electric tractors local to me in NZ in the 1930's  Google Samson Grip Electric tractors if you're interested. The guy who developed them was Chief Engineer for the local Electric Power Board in rural South Canterbury.



#11 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 6,179 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 24 November 2022 - 07:15

I am interested but my google-fu fails me. The best i can find is An electric tractor works alongside a horse team in Canterbury in the 1930s. The electric tractor was developed in Ashburton to increase local demand for electricity. Although the machine looked cumbersome, with its pivoted turret through which the feeder cable was passed from a transformer on a nearby truck, it worked quite well. The eight machines built managed over 8,000 hours work between them. However, tractors driven by oil fuels proved cheaper to run.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/photograph/18408/electric-tractor


#12 Greg Locock

Greg Locock
  • Member

  • 6,179 posts
  • Joined: March 03

Posted 24 November 2022 - 07:18

https://www.stuff.co...wer-to-the-land

 

Not an official Samson though, they were gone by 1930



#13 GregThomas

GregThomas
  • Member

  • 147 posts
  • Joined: January 22

Posted 24 November 2022 - 17:22

I'd been told about them as a kid. But that link is about all there is on line I think.