Jump to content


Photo

UK racing venues: the definitive list


  • Please log in to reply
274 replies to this topic

#251 DouglasM

DouglasM
  • Member

  • 50 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 17 May 2019 - 02:03

In my dotage I can vaguely remember going to something about 50 years ago that I can only describe as a autocross near Pitlochry in Perthshire, Scotland. It seemed to be rather a parochial gathering! Any thoughts?



Advertisement

#252 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Administrator

  • 34,294 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 17 May 2019 - 06:34

Dunkeswell Sprint, nr Honiton, Burnham-on-Sea/Weston-super-Mare Motor Clubs, 9 May 1971

FTD Geoff Inglis, (Brabham BT14/21 Ford S/C 1.6), 2m 21.1 secs

Motoring News, 13 May 1971

 

RGDS RLT 

On the former RAF Dunkeswell, originally built for the Fleet Air Arm, but mainly used by American anti-sub patrols.

 

https://www.southwes....uk/page16.html

 

Also now the home of the Our Noige Kart Club:

 

https://mansellkartclub.co.uk/history/



#253 john aston

john aston
  • Member

  • 1,749 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 18 May 2019 - 06:02

I wonder if HIgh Eggborough , in what was then the West Riding of Yorkshire , rings any bells? It was the venue for De Lacey Club organised autocross . , before rallycross effectively superseded it . Held in an old sand pit ,with elevated viewing . A regular haunt of the legendary Colin 'Mad Dan' Grewer , whose Volvo engined  Mark 1 Cortina was usually at the front .



#254 Rupertlt1

Rupertlt1
  • Member

  • 1,379 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 08 June 2019 - 13:54

1936: Lullingstone Park Speed Trials, described as "near Orpington, in Kent" about 600 yards, loose gravel.

See Motor Sport, July 1936, Page 329.

 

Any other events held here?

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 08 June 2019 - 13:57.


#255 Rupertlt1

Rupertlt1
  • Member

  • 1,379 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:22

Edzell, Saturday 20 June 1959

15,000 plus spectators

Joint car and motorcycle meeting

"S. Hart in a Formula 2 Cooper did the three mile circuit at 95.6 m.p.h."

 

RGDS RLT



#256 fuzzi

fuzzi
  • Member

  • 557 posts
  • Joined: August 06

Posted 19 July 2019 - 05:12

RAF Edzell was leased to the US Navy in 1959 and after a try out by a group of enthusiasts (who included Jim Clark with his Porsche) it not used after June 1959 in the original form as the US Navy's security needs changed. However after the RAF gave up their occupation in 1988 it was used in 2004 for four meetings over a shorter one-mile circuit by the Bon accord MC of Aberdeen. Problems with a local land owner mean the end of racing at Edzell.

 

On Lullingstone; I didn't find any more events after that in June 1936. The Riley MC did attract some good entries with BTD going to Dennis Scribbans in ERA R9B (24.10sec)  ahead of Freddie Dixon with a supercharged Riley (24.13sec). I've not found any other mention of FWD supercharging a Riley...


Edited by fuzzi, 19 July 2019 - 05:17.


#257 Rupertlt1

Rupertlt1
  • Member

  • 1,379 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 12 October 2019 - 14:36

"Great Staughton Hill Climb" w/e of 24/25 April, 1954. Organisers: Cambridge 50 Club; Bedford Auto Enthusiasts' Club.

7/8 of a mile, no straights. Competitors included Don Moore, Jim Coplin.

 

Edit: I have the Cambridge 50 C.C. running a closed speed trial at Tempsford, 25th April 1954 (As published by the R.A.C.) 

 

More: I have the Cambridge 50 C.C. running a closed hill climb at Great Chishall, 19th September 1954 (As published by the R.A.C.) 

Also listed in Motor Sport, Sept 1954, Page 500.

 

Sprint meeting at Bawtry, Sept/Oct 1954.

 

S.O.D.C. Closed Invitation Sprint at Hastings, 16th October 1954.

Also listed in Motor Sport, Oct 1954, Page 564.

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 12 October 2019 - 16:19.


#258 Rupertlt1

Rupertlt1
  • Member

  • 1,379 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 12 October 2019 - 15:31

Bushmead Speed Trial, 25th April 1954.

Two-thirds mile course.

BTD Henry Taylor, Cooper-Vincent, 54.75 sec

(Source: Autosport, 7 May 1954. It says "Results published in last week's issue.")

 

Edit: "a disused airfield about four miles from St Neots."

 

RGDS RLT

 

Organised by Bedford Auto Enthusiasts' Club (As published by the R.A.C.)

 

RGDS RLT


Edited by Rupertlt1, 12 October 2019 - 15:31.


#259 MCS

MCS
  • Member

  • 4,162 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 12 October 2019 - 20:36

Organised by Bedford Auto Enthusiasts' Club (As published by the R.A.C.)

 

RGDS RLT

 

... Bushmead Speed Trial, 25th April 1954.

Two-thirds mile course.

BTD Henry Taylor, Cooper-Vincent, 54.75 sec

(Source: Autosport, 7 May 1954. It says "Results published in last week's issue.")

 

Edit: "a disused airfield about four miles from St Neots." ...

 

RAF Little Staughton then, west of St Neots and next to Bushmead Priory.  Light aircraft only these days, but with a WW2 history and once the home of Royale Racing Cars.



Advertisement

#260 Dick Dastardly

Dick Dastardly
  • Member

  • 636 posts
  • Joined: August 09

Posted 12 October 2019 - 20:51

There used to be [maybe still are] annual Car Sandocross meetings on the beach at Weston-Super-Mare....I spectated at the 2003 event.

Southport also held Sandocross meetings in the late 60s / early 70s.

 

Was there ever any Kart or Bike racing at Silloth in NW Cumbria? I can remember going there one weekend as a young kid.....but maybe my mind is playing tricks and I could have seen Karts and Bikes at Flookborough another time.   



#261 Geoff E

Geoff E
  • Member

  • 1,376 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 13 October 2019 - 08:21

Silloth Facebook group  https://www.facebook...loth-Road-Races

 

There's also a museum at Silloth https://www.facebook...lothmotorbikes/



#262 LittleChris

LittleChris
  • Member

  • 2,509 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 13 October 2019 - 17:04

Silloth was the place where Gary Hislop, Steve's younger ( and apparently more highly rated ) brother, lost his life unfortunately.



#263 Geoff E

Geoff E
  • Member

  • 1,376 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 13 October 2019 - 20:10

In Herefordshire -

 

Froome's Hill Motor Climb

Friday May 3rd 1907

 

Photo Post Cards (Price 2d each) of this event will be published to-morrow (Saturday)

 

They will include interesting pictures of-

The Competing Cars at Foot of the Hill. Cars Half-way up the Hill.

Cars reaching the Top of the Hill. Also several groups of Spectators' Cars.

 

Map of area http://www.streetmap...46471&A=Y&Z=120

 

Fastest times were made by "two Daimler Cars" - one of them was registration DU 442

 

Allegedly 110 cars took part.  A letter from a local councillor in the Leominster News (etc) on 17 May commented that the passage of the cars had a less detrimental effect on the road surface than a few carts of manure.

 

The road was described in the Leominster News of 10th May 1907-

The Frome's Hill which is midway between Hereford and Worcester is 1289 yards long, with a gradient at the top of about 1 in 6, while the average gradient is about 11.22. It is a "driver's hill" pure and simple. The distance was timed from a standing start to a flying finish, the total rise being just over 114 yards, the gradient at the steepest part being a "stiff pimple" as motorists like to call anything exacting.


Edited by Geoff E, 13 October 2019 - 20:30.


#264 Rupertlt1

Rupertlt1
  • Member

  • 1,379 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 20 October 2019 - 13:09

14 May 1950

Herts County A. & A.C. Closed.

Speed Trial, Beechwood Park

 

RGDS RLT



#265 Rupertlt1

Rupertlt1
  • Member

  • 1,379 posts
  • Joined: October 10

Posted 16 November 2019 - 04:39

Margate & District Car Club sprint, Manston, 12 June 1966.

 

RGDS RLT  



#266 Perruqueporte

Perruqueporte
  • Member

  • 74 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 16 November 2019 - 08:43

On the former RAF Dunkeswell, originally built for the Fleet Air Arm, but mainly used by American anti-sub patrols.

https://www.southwes....uk/page16.html

Also now the home of the Our Noige Kart Club:

https://mansellkartclub.co.uk/history/



#267 Perruqueporte

Perruqueporte
  • Member

  • 74 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 16 November 2019 - 08:49

I attended our local history society earlier this week, when the talk was about Dunkeswell airfield and Upottery (Smeetharpe) airfield. Both were constructed during WW2 and one thing I learned which fascinated me was that at the beginning of the war, many of this country’s civil engineering and construction firms (with names like Bovis and Mowlem etc.) were actually conscripted and put under the command of the services.

Christopher W.

#268 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Administrator

  • 34,294 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 16 November 2019 - 23:59

I attended our local history society earlier this week, when the talk was about Dunkeswell airfield and Upottery (Smeetharpe) airfield. Both were constructed during WW2 and one thing I learned which fascinated me was that at the beginning of the war, many of this country’s civil engineering and construction firms (with names like Bovis and Mowlem etc.) were actually conscripted and put under the command of the services.

Christopher W.

http://www.arcom.ac....-0856_Potts.pdf



#269 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 13,829 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted 17 November 2019 - 08:30

I attended our local history society earlier this week, when the talk was about Dunkeswell airfield and Upottery (Smeetharpe) airfield. Both were constructed during WW2 and one thing I learned which fascinated me was that at the beginning of the war, many of this country’s civil engineering and construction firms (with names like Bovis and Mowlem etc.) were actually conscripted and put under the command of the services.

Christopher W.

 

The RAF also "recruited" stone-masons and quarrymen. I believe there was a standard set of plans and dependant on the land available and the normal wind direction the construction teams built one of the standard options (e.g. Thruxton and Woodvale have identical layouts).



#270 Perruqueporte

Perruqueporte
  • Member

  • 74 posts
  • Joined: January 11

Posted 17 November 2019 - 20:58

http://www.arcom.ac....-0856_Potts.pdf

The RAF also "recruited" stone-masons and quarrymen. I believe there was a standard set of plans and dependant on the land available and the normal wind direction the construction teams built one of the standard options (e.g. Thruxton and Woodvale have identical layouts).

That’s is fascinating, and an aspect of the war that I knew nothing about. Thank you. The sheer numbers are extraordinary.

Christopher W.

Edited by Perruqueporte, 17 November 2019 - 20:59.


#271 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Member

  • 13,829 posts
  • Joined: December 04

Posted Yesterday, 08:37

That’s is fascinating, and an aspect of the war that I knew nothing about. Thank you. The sheer numbers are extraordinary.

Christopher W.

 

I borrowed a book about British Airfields (World War 2 Airfields by Philip Birtles) and noticed the number of identical layouts. I then met a stone mason who helped layout the airfields and source the foundation material.

 

In fact I have just spotted a copy on EBay and made the purchase!


Edited by Stephen W, Yesterday, 08:41.


#272 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 9,089 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted Yesterday, 16:25

I also read somewhere that in some cases instead of hardcore or crushed rock they used wood chips as the sub-base for runways and perimeter tracks but I have been unable to substantiate this.  Has anyone else seen this?



#273 glyn parham

glyn parham
  • Member

  • 346 posts
  • Joined: May 04

Posted Yesterday, 20:05

During my career as a land surveyor in the south east of England (in local government) I had the task of surveying the former RAF West Malling.
Originally built as Maidstone aerodrome in the 30's it was commandeered by the War Office and enlarged in time to be a prominent Battle of Britain airfield.
In 1944 the airfield was closed down and rebuilt with standard War Office designed buildings from hangars to mess blocks, Air Traffic Control Tower to Operation Blocks.
During our survey in 1978 or thereabouts we found paper copies, dated 1944, of the majority of buildings to be found at West Malling and they were all marked with the appropriate type numbers used by Air Ministry architects.
I wish I still had access to those drawings to show but they were proof of the fact that standard designs were used, probably for cost effectiveness, so that airmen knew their way round an airfield no matter which one they were based at.
Glyn

#274 Vitesse2

Vitesse2
  • Administrator

  • 34,294 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted Yesterday, 22:44

I also read somewhere that in some cases instead of hardcore or crushed rock they used wood chips as the sub-base for runways and perimeter tracks but I have been unable to substantiate this.  Has anyone else seen this?

A tar/woodchip mix was used on the runway surfaces of some heavy bomber bases. Perhaps that's what you're thinking of? This had two purposes - it was easier on the tyres than concrete when landing and, because the woodchip could be dyed, it also acted as a form of camouflage for the base. If you consult reports of the Elstree Sprint on Easter Monday 1946, you'll find it's mentioned!

 

This type of surface is noted in (for example) the entry for Foulsham in Aviation Landmarks - Norfolk and Suffolk by Peter B. Gunn.



#275 D-Type

D-Type
  • Member

  • 9,089 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted Yesterday, 23:06

That could well be what I read.