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One-hit wonders


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#51 Pikachu Racing

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 05:08

Andrea Montermini - have two great runs with underfunded Euromotorsports team with a 4th place finish in Detroit and qualifying 7th in Toronto. What is least known is his bad luck. The teams he drove for happen to fold. Euromotorsports, SimTek, Pacific, Forti, and Bernstein.

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#52 king_crud

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 08:35

Originally posted by byrkus
Not exactly 'nostalgia'; but couldn't Olivier Panis fit into the list? He won -more or less luckily- Monaco GP, scored two or three lucky other podiums, but otherwise, no big results from him.

But don't get me wrong, I have big respect fpr him. All his f1 career he's driving some underdog cars (with possible exception of 1997 Prost), and in those he had quite decent results. But his win in Monaco was something, that could be considered as 'one hit wonder'.


I thought this too, but i think Panis results were due to races with high attrition (Germany 93, Monaco 96) rather than him being on the pace from the start. They were one offs but i think we're more talking about drivers who were on the front runners pace for rather than ending up at the front from the front runners dropping out.

One's that spring to mind are qualifying for the 1990 USGP. From memory Pierluigi Martini qualified second in a Minardi and DeCesaris qualified third in a Dallara! Didn't last in the race though. And Trulli in the Prost qualifiying on pole for Austria 99 (i think). He was doing well in the race until the car expired.

#53 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 09:37

Originally posted by MPea3
I'm no buford, but i can add this about Harroun. his indy 500 victory wasn't even his first at indianapolis. on may 29, 1910, he won the 200 mile wheeler-schebler trophy race at IMS at an average apeed of 72.0 mph. on may 7 of that same year, he won the 200 mile race at the atlanta 2 mile autodrome at an average speed of 66.0 mph, and just a few weeks before that (april 13) won the 100 mile race at the playa del rey 1 mile motordrome in los angeles at an average apeed of 78.8 mph. apparently in addition to being a good engineer, mr harroun was a pretty decent race car driver as well.


Of course you're right...

But look at the 'other' victories of many listed in this thread... they're all in the same boat.

But Harroun's final big win was at the 'Grand Epreuve' level that's pursued in this thread.

#54 Mohican

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 11:04

Nobody has mentioned one of the most unexpected results in modern racing: Damon Hill's second place in the Hungarian GP 1997 - he very nearly won it too.

Apart from that, combination of D. Hill and Arrows were an unmitigated disaster.

#55 Vitesse2

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 13:24

Originally posted by Mohican
Nobody has mentioned one of the most unexpected results in modern racing: Damon Hill's second place in the Hungarian GP 1997 - he very nearly won it too.

Apart from that, combination of D. Hill and Arrows were an unmitigated disaster.


Shouldn't that read "combination of T. Walkinshaw and Arrows were an unmitigated disaster"? :p

#56 Mohican

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Posted 04 February 2003 - 16:55

Vitesse, i agree with you.
Never understood what constituted Walkinshaw's supposed genius. The difference between Arrows and his earlier ventures (varioius TWR racing programmes with Mazda, Jaguar, Volvo etc; as well as the much-hyped Benetton and Ligier episodes) were that with Arrows he was responsible not only for engineering and racecraft - but also for people and finances.

At which he singularly and very publicly failed. this could happen to anybody - what would not happen to anybody was the refusal to recognise the situation, the obfuscation, the reliance on evermore fanciful financial schemes (Nigerian princes, etc).

All very sad.

#57 masterhit

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Posted 18 January 2004 - 01:55

Satoru Nakajima was very, very fast in the wet Australian G.P. in.. '89?

Gianni Morbidelli had a good result at the Australian G.P. too. Arguably Morbidelli is up there with the nearly men of F1, those drivers who show pace but maybe not the luck or the temperament. I regard him as a Chris Amon that never got the drive for long enough - admittedly this is based on him being the fastest thing by far at Paris Bercy karting against the likes of Michael Schumacher (who unsurprisingly punted him off at the first corner of the final)

#58 Graham Clayton

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 05:09

Does Midge Bosworth, winner of the 1965 Bathurst 1965 touring car race with Bo Seton qualify as a one hit wonder?

I was unable to find out any details of his non-Bathurst career, so could someone post some of his other major victories?

#59 Gary Davies

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 06:51

Ah, this thread again. I'm a tad surprised that J-PB hasn't figured so far. So I should like to celebrate that marvellous, out of the blue drive of Jean-Pierre Beltoise at Monaco in 1972. So imperious, so emphatic and he beat Ickx and Stewart into the bargain. I was so pleased to see it. BRM's last win as well, I believe.

I don't know the degree to which his Reims crash in 1964 affected his arm movement but there's assuredly a lot of arm twirling required over 80 laps of a wet Monaco circuit. I believe this was JP's only victory at the top level but he certainly achieved a lot of success in other categories. And, of course, he is one of that small band of international standard motorcycle racers who made it to the top of Formula One.

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#60 Tim Murray

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 07:05

It was his only World Championship victory, but he did also win the non-championship Victory Race at Brands Hatch in October 1972 in the unloved BRM P180 - another one-hit wonder.

#61 Gary Davies

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:59

So he did, Tim. Thanks.

#62 Stephen W

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 10:15

Ah, this thread again. I'm a tad surprised that J-PB hasn't figured so far. So I should like to celebrate that marvellous, out of the blue drive of Jean-Pierre Beltoise at Monaco in 1972. So imperious, so emphatic and he beat Ickx and Stewart into the bargain. I was so pleased to see it. BRM's last win as well, I believe.


J-P Beltoise started the race from fourth place on the grid behind Fittipaldi, Ickx & Regazzoni. He was already moving before the flag dropped and by St Devote was in the lead. This extended over the first few laps, as you would expect in the streaming wet conditions, giving him the advantage for the rest of the race.

:wave:



#63 Gary Davies

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 10:22

Is this an example of 'damned with faint praise'? :cool:

#64 Giraffe

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 10:28

I don't know the degree to which his Reims crash in 1964 affected his arm movement but there's assuredly a lot of arm twirling required over 80 laps of a wet Monaco circuit.


I always understood that it was the wet conditions that contributed greatly to his victory in that it was less stressful on his arm than it would have been in dry conditions.

#65 Paul Parker

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 11:13

I always understood that it was the wet conditions that contributed greatly to his victory in that it was less stressful on his arm than it would have been in dry conditions.


Yes indeed, a dry Monaco wouId have been much more demanding physically, especially for Beltoise whose Reims crash permanently impaired his left arm and caused other left side injuries. Additionally I recall Flavien Marcais telling me at one of the Monaco Historiques some years ago that the BRM (in his case I think the P180) was much easier to drive in the wet than a DFV powered car, the V12 motor being smoother and less torquey than the Cossie.



#66 Michael Ferner

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 14:51

J-P Beltoise started the race from fourth place on the grid behind Fittipaldi, Ickx & Regazzoni. He was already moving before the flag dropped and by St Devote was in the lead. This extended over the first few laps, as you would expect in the streaming wet conditions, giving him the advantage for the rest of the race.

:wave:


... which is an old myth, that doesn't get more accurate with the number of times it gets repeated. Check your facts, mate! ;)

#67 Giraffe

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 15:12

I think Stephen's programme got as wet as mine did that day Michael....

Posted Image
By giraffe138 at 2009-05-25

#68 Gary Davies

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 15:38

Shouldn't that read "combination of T. Walkinshaw and Arrows were an unmitigated disaster"? :p


Or even, "combination of T. Walkinshaw and Arrows were was an unmitigated disaster"? :p

#69 Jean L

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 15:44

The start of Monaco 1972 at 0:27

Youtube kill the myth !

#70 Tim Murray

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 16:06

Youtube kill the myth !

It would seem so. However, the report of the race by Paddy McNally in Autosport says that both Beltoise and Regazzoni (on row 2) were moving before the flag fell.

#71 Bloggsworth

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 16:27

Nobody has mentioned one of the most unexpected results in modern racing: Damon Hill's second place in the Hungarian GP 1997 - he very nearly won it too.

Apart from that, combination of D. Hill and Arrows were an unmitigated disaster.


I would dispute that - The combination of Arrows and any other driver but Hill were an unmitigated disaster. He was also within a gnat's cock of putting the Arrows on pole at the Spanish GP but for being baulked in the last corner. Hill was the only driver who made the Arrows of that era look like a racing car...

Edited by Bloggsworth, 28 June 2011 - 16:28.


#72 Paul Parker

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 16:51

I would dispute that - The combination of Arrows and any other driver but Hill were an unmitigated disaster. He was also within a gnat's cock of putting the Arrows on pole at the Spanish GP but for being baulked in the last corner. Hill was the only driver who made the Arrows of that era look like a racing car...


My thoughts too.

Damon Hill never got the praise he deserved despite starting in F1 with an uncompetitive car at a very late age by modern standards.

#73 rallen

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 19:06

My thoughts too.

Damon Hill never got the praise he deserved despite starting in F1 with an uncompetitive car at a very late age by modern standards.



Has any one driver in the history of F1 ever had so many great team mates? - Prost, Senna, Mansell? Never outshone really by any of them. he, should have won at least the same number of races as Prost - Alain inherited two victories from Damon that year which would have put them 5 each. Also very under rated wet weather driver, people talk of Boutsen being great in the rain but you never hear of Damon mentioned like that.



#74 Michael Ferner

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 20:33

Yes, he made everyone else look very ordinary indeed in the rains at Suzuka ('94), Interlagos and Monaco in '96! :up:

#75 D-Type

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 20:53

I've often felt that the 20 or so singleton GP winners would make an interesting subject for a book of potted biographies. There are some interesting careers there. In some cases it's surprising tht they only had the one win and you wonder why, while for others that single win must have been a career peak.

#76 philippe7

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 00:56

I always understood that it was the wet conditions that contributed greatly to his victory in that it was less stressful on his arm than it would have been in dry conditions.



Speaking of wet weather advantage, Jean-Pierre was also actually leading ( by most accounts...) the controversial 1973 Canadian Grand Prix held in just as soaked conditions as Monaco, when the race direction wrongly sent out the pace car in front of Howden Ganley.... which resulted in the well documented shambles and disputes about who was the real winner ( and who should have been....)

#77 Ray Bell

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 01:40

Originally posted by Graham Clayton
Does Midge Bosworth, winner of the 1965 Bathurst 1965 touring car race with Bo Seton qualify as a one hit wonder?

I was unable to find out any details of his non-Bathurst career, so could someone post some of his other major victories?


I guess you could say that he does...

I don't recall him ever winning a race in his early Holden racing days, though he might have got up in a handicap or finished in a second here or there. There were no 'major victories' outside of the '65 Bathurst.

Barry Mulholland would have fallen into the same category, I'm sure.

#78 rallen

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 08:09

I've often felt that the 20 or so singleton GP winners would make an interesting subject for a book of potted biographies. There are some interesting careers there. In some cases it's surprising tht they only had the one win and you wonder why, while for others that single win must have been a career peak.


That is a brilliant idea D Type! would love to read that book! :up:

#79 Gary Davies

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 08:43

How could we overlook the Monza Gorilla, Vittorio Brambilla?!! I'm sure the picture below will bring back that day in Austria to all TNFers. I'm sure we all recall what happened as he crossed the line! It was a solid and well earned win, too. And, I think, the first Grande Epreuve win for the works March team.

Posted Image

It's almost exactly 10 years since we lost him, way too early, to a heart attack at 63.

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#80 Graham Clayton

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 02:13

Here is a true "one-hit wonder"

In 1951, Marvin Burke won the 250 mile NASCAR race at the Oakland Stadium in Oakland, California on the 14th of October. It was his one and only NASCAR race.

There were two other NASCAR races held on the same day, at Pine Grove Speedway in Shippenville, Pennsylvania and Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Virginia. These two races attracted the top NASCAR drivers such as Herb Thomas, Lee Petty and Tim Flock. Burke thus competed against mainly local California drivers.



#81 Graham Clayton

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 09:45

Other one-time winners who seemed to miss out undeservedly on a better chance include Sam McQuagg and Lennie Pond.


ensign14,

McQuagg was an interesting case. His lone NASCAR victory was the beginning of the "aero-wars", when his car (and the other Dodge Chargers) were the only cars fitted with an aerodynamic spoiler. When everyone started to run spoilers, he never looked like winning another race:

http://georgiaracing...poiler-in-1966/






#82 BRG

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 10:23

Can we now add the renowned Italian railway enthusiast and vintner, Jarno Trulli? Fifteen F1 seasons and one win.

#83 ryan86

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 00:49

His teammates, the majority whom were race winners themselves, scored 1 win driving alongside him and a lot of the time Trulli out-scored his them. Whilst that weekend in Monaco was very much his day of days, many sensed that Monaco 2004 win was coming based upon his impressive early season form and even throughout his time at Toyota, there were many equally impressive performances, including Japan 2009. He may have only that one victory, but I don't believe he never looked like winning before he won, and afterwards he again had races where he could have won.

#84 Nikos Spagnol

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 03:26


Markus Winkelhock?

Debuted by starting last, pitted for intermediates before the start, and was leading by a margin by Lap 2.

And was never seen again in F1...

#85 Jimisgod

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 06:22

I've often felt that the 20 or so singleton GP winners would make an interesting subject for a book of potted biographies. There are some interesting careers there. In some cases it's surprising tht they only had the one win and you wonder why, while for others that single win must have been a career peak.


Sure would. Just from the last few years:

Kubica - Taken by injury not long into what seemed a promising career. A podium in his first few races as a mid year replacement no less! May have been where Raikkonen is today.
Trulli - Career that promised much, had many chances but never quite delivered. Like Alesi to an extent.
Heikki - Had a big chance at McLaren in their championship season, only managed a single win on a day that reliability took out the other top cars.

Not exactly 'nostalgia'; but couldn't Olivier Panis fit into the list? He won -more or less luckily- Monaco GP, scored two or three lucky other podiums, but otherwise, no big results from him.

But don't get me wrong, I have big respect fpr him. All his f1 career he's driving some underdog cars (with possible exception of 1997 Prost), and in those he had quite decent results. But his win in Monaco was something, that could be considered as 'one hit wonder'.


Panis never quite recovered from his Canada accident. Never even got on the podium after his legs were broken, whereas he had 5 before in not so great cars.


#86 kayemod

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 13:51

Panis never quite recovered from his Canada accident. Never even got on the podium after his legs were broken, whereas he had 5 before in not so great cars.


Many drivers have continued much as before after recovering from below the knee breakages, but I can't think of a single one who made a comparable recovery from a femoral (major above the knee fracture), which can easily prove fatal as it did with poor Ronnie Peterson. I'm not a racing driver, or sportsman of any kind, but I speak from sad personal experience, take it from me, your legs are just never the same after that. Panis is one example, Graham Hill was another, but there must be several more. Both of those two were still quite good when they returned, but they never regained their previous form.

#87 ensign14

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:29

Many drivers have continued much as before after recovering from below the knee breakages, but I can't think of a single one who made a comparable recovery from a femoral (major above the knee fracture), which can easily prove fatal as it did with poor Ronnie Peterson.

Caracciola. Which goes to demonstrate just how under-rated he is. The more I look at it, the more I think he was the pre-war number one. Sorry Tazio.

#88 Graham Clayton

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 10:13

Back in 1986 Finnish rally driver Mikael Sundstrom competed in three BTCC races , driving a Peugeot Talbot Sport UK-entered 205GTi. The Brands Hatch round on August 25 was held in wet conditions, and Sundstrom's rally skills came to the fore, bringing the 205 home 3rd overall, behind Andy Rouse's XR4Ti and Andy Curnow's Ford Escort.

AFAIK, he did no other circuit racing, so this 3rd I think puts him in the "one-hit wonder" category.



#89 chr1s

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 21:02

Jean-Pierre Jarier? Those two pole positions at the beginning of 1975 and another in Canada 78' but that was more or less it.

#90 Graham Clayton

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 06:50

Mario Hytten finished 5th at the 1985 Le Mans 24 Hours, sharing a Porsche 956B with George Fouché and Sarel van der Merwe, but apart from that result, had no other placings of note during his sports car racing career.

#91 Tim Murray

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 07:25

To be fair, that was his only attempt at Le Mans, and for the rest of his sports car career he hardly ever drove cars capable of top six finishes. He was better known as a single seater racer:

http://www.racingspo...-Hytten-CH.html

#92 W154

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:40

Caracciola. Which goes to demonstrate just how under-rated he is. The more I look at it, the more I think he was the pre-war number one. Sorry Tazio.

:up:

#93 Graham Clayton

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 10:28

Gerhard Mitter's 4th place in the 1963 German Grand Prix was his best result out of 5 WC GP's that he competed in - his other results were a 9th and 3 retirements.



#94 Spaceframe

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 14:24

I'd like to suggest Masahiro Hasemi. Fastest race lap at Fuji in '76 in the Kojima, nothing else in F1. Although he did win the Japanese F2 title in 1980 and later a couple of Japanese Touring Car Championships, the Japanese Sports Car Championship and the Daytona 24 hours....



#95 E.B.

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 14:42

Fastest race lap at Fuji in '76 in the Kojima


A quick forum search will reveal what most people think of that.

#96 Spaceframe

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 15:16

A quick forum search will reveal what most people think of that.

I know, special monsoon tyres from Dunlop or Bridgestone.



#97 ensign14

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 15:31

More that the organizers ballsed it up and the FL was actually by Lafitte...



#98 Spaceframe

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 15:35

More that the organizers ballsed it up and the FL was actually by Lafitte...

Ah, thanks.



#99 Spaceframe

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 12:19

Has any one driver in the history of F1 ever had so many great team mates? - Prost, Senna, Mansell? Never outshone really by any of them. he, should have won at least the same number of races as Prost - Alain inherited two victories from Damon that year which would have put them 5 each. Also very under rated wet weather driver, people talk of Boutsen being great in the rain but you never hear of Damon mentioned like that.

I would think Niki Lauda had the strongest team-mates of anybody. Except for Jean-Pierre Beltoise, who "only" won a Grand Prix, every team-mate of Lauda was or became either a world champion or a runner-up - Peterson at March, Regazzoni at BRM and Ferrari, Reutemann ar Ferrari, Watson at Brabham and McLaren, Piquet at Brabham and finally Prost at McLaren.

 

However, Damon Hill's list of team-mates is indeed impressive.



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#100 Spaceframe

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 12:54

Jean-Pierre Jarier? Those two pole positions at the beginning of 1975 and another in Canada 78' but that was more or less it.

I was tempted to say, he was a one-season wonder, as he was at or near the front on numerous occasions during 1975. Led at Interlagos and Silverstone (but then,who didn'tlead that one....), ran second at Anderstorp and Zandvoort, and ran third at Montjuich (another chaotic race, although for different reasons than Silverstone) and Watkins Glen. Unfortunately the Shadow DN5 didn't have the reliability tomatch its speed.

 

But, besides the pole and runaway lead at Montreal in '78, he also ran strongly at Interlagos in '76 (fastest lap on that occasion), and he also stood up well against Pironi at Tyrrell in 1979 (equal on points, losing out five against eight in qualifying), and then there was Long Beach '83, where he was in a strong position, after the Goodyear-shod Williams and Ferraris had led initially. He was the leading runner on Michelins (the tyre to hve that day, as witnessed by the impressive McLaren 1-2 from 22nd and 23rd on the grid). On the latter occasion he fumbled himself (hitting one of the leaders and destroying his car due to lack of patience, as I recall it).

 

But the word I find most appropriate would be enigma. He coud be unbeatable and he could be nowhere. There was a portrait in MotorSport of 2003, which the author (Mark Hughes) starts with a recount of a 1996 Porsche Super Cup race at Paul Ricard. Jarier got a slightly bad start, and Hughes describes how Jarier attempts taking second place:

 

"Each time through, he'd be way quicker into the corner than his opponent, but this woul put him smack on his tail by the apex, restricting him to the same exit speed.

 

"Within a few laps, the penny seemed to drop. He held back, allowing himself more room, and got a clear run into the turn. This time, he was breathtaking. It was difficult to believe what your eyes were telling you, the way the rear-engined car was being held in a delicate pre-apex slide without the rear's momentum overtaking the front, how the forward motion was being maintained, but mostof all the sheer difference in velocity between this and anyone else. It was beautiful; a place where physics met poetry. He was hard on the power even as the apex was kissed, the car sitting on its heavy haunches under weight transference and shooting out of that corner as a missile.

 

"The guy in second looked easy meat now as Jarier caught him hand over fist. But just before they went out of sight over a brow, he saw Jarier was closing and began to move across his bows. As they disappeared, you knew that Jean-Pierre was going to have to lift to avoid contact; but no matter, he'd be able to nail him on another lap. Except that's not what happened.

 

"Flying bodywork pierced the horizon, and next time through, Jarier was down in about sixth place, with no front spoiler, race effectively over."