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April 7th 1968: Jim Clark remembered (merged)


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#551 JohnH

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 06:35

Here’s some pics of April 6, 1968. Drivers Jim Clark and Kurt Ahrens drive to Wiesbaden from the Hotel Luxhof in Speyer
They film a tv show ,
Then head nearby to the Adler Stübchen for the final drink

Adolfsallee 44, 65185 Wiesbaden, Germany appears to be the address- I’ve seen references to the bar online still being there but there’s no street view so I can’t swoop in to check. Amazing the pics of the signatures on the wall of the bar!

3080744_A-634_A-499_E-_AEB5-_A66_FAE2_BA

D094_B8_B0-1_B63-46_D2-8_AD0-_D8_FC03_CD

C57_B067_C-07_F6-4373-_A1_E8-85_DF9256_D

3_B6_C232_D-_F3_EA-4_D0_B-93_A6-_A4_B45_

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6_A9551_B0-_A3_D2-4331-9_AFE-_D3899_B995

746827_EC-3_B33-408_D-9252-_E36_A3_FAA1_

Edited by JohnH, 08 April 2018 - 06:37.


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#552 john aston

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 06:36

Actually , can I swim against the tide here? As a  15 year old my reaction to  Clark's death wasn't some great emotional blow at all, It was only surprise , and some selfish disappointment that I now wouldn't get to see him race.I suspect I wasn't the only one to feel like that - because dying was what racing drivers did and I got used to that very quickly. Didn't we all?

 

It's only now that the poignancy of his loss - and the rest of then in that horrible year - has real resonance .



#553 Gary C

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 06:53

http://www.users.glo...orial/index.htm

 Can't remember if I've posted this before, this  is a page from my old website, from when I visited the original memorial back in 2002 when I worked for FOM.



#554 Tim Murray

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 08:39

Here’s an article recently posted on the French Classic Courses site which includes Graham Hill’s tribute to Jim, originally published in Sports Illustrated magazine a couple of weeks after the accident:

https://www.classicc...-a-jimmy-clark/

It also includes the photo of Clark with the small girl, stating that it was taken on 7th April 1968 at Hockenheim.

ETA: Here’s the original Sports Illustrated article (in English):

https://www.si.com/v...-to-jimmy-clark

#555 SamoanAttorney

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 12:10

As one might expect from a writer of Maurice Hamilton's class, another piece from the heart

 

http://www.espn.com/...ial-50-years-on



#556 kayemod

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 12:51

Actually , can I swim against the tide here? As a  15 year old my reaction to  Clark's death wasn't some great emotional blow at all, It was only surprise , and some selfish disappointment that I now wouldn't get to see him race.I suspect I wasn't the only one to feel like that - because dying was what racing drivers did and I got used to that very quickly. Didn't we all?

 

It's only now that the poignancy of his loss - and the rest of then in that horrible year - has real resonance .

 

My feelings pretty much exactly, although I appreciated Jim's brilliance, I was never really a big fan in those days, Graham Hill was my man back then, and while he was racing, Stirling of course. After his near fatal Goodwood crash, my mum was so shocked by the effect it had on me, that she took me off school and to our GP to ask about treatment for depression, and that was long before half the Country was on prescribed Prozac. What made a bigger impression on that fateful day was the effect the news of Jim's death had on the people around me, adults were in tears. It's a bit like JFK's demise, they say that everyone remembers where they were that day, (I was in a Chinese restaurant in Liverpool's Lime Street, my parents and other diners were more visibly affected than me though, I just wanted to get stuck into my chicken & bamboo shoots). When the news about Jim came on the radio, I was racing in a slot car meeting at the rear of a dry cleaner's in Southall. Many of my fellow racers had had to toss a coin to decide between racing our toy cars and going to the sports car race at nearby Brands Hatch. Being full size face fans as well, many of them were devastated. Jim was originally scheduled to race at Brands of course, in which case he might have still been with us today.

 

John's last line sums everything up for me.



#557 B Squared

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 14:07

This photo has been posted and reposted several times in this thread, but as none of the earlier postings still show up, here it is again - one of my favourites:

661e1449168cc2ff4c18a853f1d120bf--damon-

We never did work out who the little girl was.

RIP Jim. It certainly doesn’t seem like fifty years.

Hi Tim is that photo with the girl the day of or that weekend?

The first I saw the photo was in Automobile Year #16 by itself in tribute to Jim on page 152 of the English language version. The caption reads "Many reports suggest that Jim Clark was uneasy before the start of his last race, but this photograph taken just before the start of the line-up indicates he was in a happy mood. The little German girl looks suitably awed by the great man's presence and interest!"

The photo credits list page is not numbered, but if it were, it would be 259. The photographer is listed as Wolfgang Frankenhauser. Possibly Irish?  ;)

I was on the road in the DC area, but thought of Jim Clark yesterday. I agree with john aston and kayemod, I remember it and what I was doing that day, but had by now gotten a bit used to this side of the sport, although I'd just turned 10 years old. I read a lot about racing history and knew that it was sad, but part of it and you better get used to it - but oh my God, how I loved the sport so I accepted it. That day I had laid out Lincoln Logs in the pattern of one of the Grand Prix circuits and was imaginatively "racing" my many Matchbox Grand Prix cars around it. The TV was on, and I believe it was CBS breaking into the regularly scheduled program to announce Jim's death. I let my Dad, Mom and brother know and was sad that I wouldn't get to see him race the Lotus 56 at Indy the next month. I'm just glad that I did get to see him at Indy for a couple of his previous outings.


Edited by B Squared, 08 April 2018 - 14:09.


#558 PCC

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 14:58

...dying was what racing drivers did and I got used to that very quickly. Didn't we all?

To be honest, I never did. I was slightly too young to have seen Jim Clark race - I started following the sport the year after. My first big loss was Bruce McLaren, whose autograph I'd gotten the year before he died. I still remember the feeling of being punched in the stomach when I came home from school for lunch and was told the news by my grandmother. It was a feeling I would experience two more times before the next school year started.

 

In Canada even more than Europe, racing news was hard to come by back then. But in the mid '70s there was a CBC radio show on Sunday evenings called "The Weekend Sound of Sports", which always gave racing results. I still remember the blend of excitement and dread I'd feel as the theme music started up - excitement at learning the results, and dread that there might also be bad news. I envied my friends whose favourite sport was hockey, and whose heroes weren't getting killed in action at the rate of two or three per season.

 

I think my path has been the opposite of yours - it's in retrospect that I can understand these tragedies and accept them not because they were inevitable, but because I have a better appreciation of risk and those who choose to take them. But at the time, it was just one body-blow after another.

 

Ah, nostalgia...



#559 D28

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 17:34

 

 

In Canada even more than Europe, racing news was hard to come by back then. 

 

Yes it certainly was. I used to rely on Globe & Mail for terse results of the F1 races, nothing more. Except when Jim Clark died it was major news, I guess because he was so famous. A friend with no interest whatever in motor sport told me some guy called Clark had perished. I didn't really believe it, asked him if it was Roger Clark, of course he couldn't say. The day I remember clearly and also realize it is 50 years on, as my graduating class is getting ready to mark that milestone. My reaction mirrored practically every contemporary driver; it just couldn't happen to Jim, he was too talented. I realized that day how cruel the sport could be.


Edited by D28, 08 April 2018 - 17:36.


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#560 kayemod

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 17:39

To be honest, I never did. I was slightly too young to have seen Jim Clark race - I started following the sport the year after. My first big loss was Bruce McLaren, whose autograph I'd gotten the year before he died. I still remember the feeling of being punched in the stomach when I came home from school for lunch and was told the news by my grandmother. It was a feeling I would experience two more times before the next school year started.

 

I think my path has been the opposite of yours - it's in retrospect that I can understand these tragedies and accept them not because they were inevitable, but because I have a better appreciation of risk and those who choose to take them. But at the time, it was just one body-blow after another.

 

Ah, nostalgia...

 

 

It's a difficult thing to explain, and in order of magnitude, maybe not quite as cataclysmic as poor Jim's untimely end, but Bruce's death had the greatest effect on me. On the 'where you were at the time thing', I was on the top deck of a no 73 London Transport bus in Southwark, travelling to Kings Cross to catch a train. I looked down and saw an Evening Standard news board, as far as I can remember, all it said was "BRUCE McCLAREN KILLED". That really did hit me hard, I caught the train in a daze. Bruce was as much a stranger to me as Jim really, though I'd seen them both race. It's just impossible to explain these things, our feelings etc, isn't it?



#561 Jagjon

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 18:50

The first I saw the photo was in Automobile Year #16 by itself in tribute to Jim on page 152 of the English language version. The caption reads "Many reports suggest that Jim Clark was uneasy before the start of his last race, but this photograph taken just before the start of the line-up indicates he was in a happy mood. The little German girl looks suitably awed by the great man's presence and interest!"

The photo credits list page is not numbered, but if it were, it would be 259. The photographer is listed as Wolfgang Frankenhauser. Possibly Irish?  ;)
 

 

 

 

The young girl could have been Graham Hill's daughter  Samantha who would have been about  4 years old.  GH  had flown into Germany & maybe the family had been with him or the photo was taken on a previous occasion.


Edited by Jagjon, 08 April 2018 - 18:52.


#562 Tim Murray

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 18:56

Monday, March 4, 1968 Longford - playing in the rain on his 32nd birthday. After a few laps of mucky weather possibly wishing he could whip through the Mountford property gates and have a nice warm cuppa and some birthday cake.

Jim_Clark_Longford_1968_TNF.jpg

Stephen


Interesting that he’s using a visor instead of his usual goggles here. I gather he didn’t care much for the bubble visors that many other drivers used in wet weather, as he felt they distorted his vision. Did he use a visor in any other races?

#563 Tim Murray

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 19:07

The young girl could have been Graham Hill's daughter Samantha who would have been about 4 years old. GH had flown into Germany & maybe the family had been with him or the photo was taken on a previous occasion.


I don’t reckon her nose is the same shape as Samantha’s:

11-novembre-1968-graham-hill-retour-de-g

#564 Nick Planas

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 19:23

If it WAS a young 'whoever' Hill, it most certainly wasn't taken at Hockenheim. Not only does Beaky Sims (ref Gary's link above) say that there were just 4 team members there on the day, himself and Michael Gregory, Jim and NGH, but I also checked Damon's autobiography today and he is clear that his 8 year old self saw the newsflash on the TV at home and told his mother Bette, who promptly left the room in shock. 



#565 Vitesse2

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 20:22

The young girl could have been Graham Hill's daughter  Samantha who would have been about  4 years old.  GH  had flown into Germany & maybe the family had been with him or the photo was taken on a previous occasion.

The only possible previous occasion in 1968 would have been Montjuich the previous weekend. Since - AFAIK - nobody has ever suggested that it was taken there, I think we can take it as read that it's Hockenheim. And we know that Bette and the family weren't there.



#566 SophieB

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Posted 09 April 2018 - 10:21

Nigel Roebuck and Peter Windsor et al sharing their memories of Jim Clark and paying tribute to his talent 
 
AutoClassics@autoclassicscom Apr 7
 Double #F1 world champion Jim Clark died 50 years ago today. To commemorate his illustrious career, we're bringing you an @F1Racing_mag feature one week early, as respected grand prix writers @PeterDWindsor and Nigel Roebuck share their memories of Clark. #JimClark50
 
https://www.autoclas...-clark-standard
 
 
Peter Windsor:
 

'Well in 1968 I went out to the airport to see him off after the Longford race in Tasmania. He flew in to Sydney and then on to Indianapolis and his plane was delayed. I was with my dad and he said: "Come and have a coffee".
'He was with one of the stewardesses – oddly – and we went up and he was in his famous check shirt, nice slacks and he had his briefcase with him and we sat down. The four of us chatted for about 20 minutes.
'It seems incredible today that that happened to me. But I remember saying to Jimmy: "I really really want to get a job in motor racing. I just hate that feeling on Monday morning of going back to school after being at a race meeting. How do I get through that Jim?" And he said: "If you really want it badly enough, never ever give up. Whatever you want, you’ll achieve as long as you never give up."
'And I told him I really wanted to be a journalist and he said: "Don’t give up." That was basically the last thing that he said to me and I was probably the last person to speak to him in Australia. Sadly he died a couple of months later.
'Since then I’ve had ups and downs in life, like all of us, but whenever it’s a down, I always think of that moment when Jimmy said: "If you really want it badly enough, never ever give up."
'That was actually a pivotal moment in my life. We often use phrases like that, but for me it was. Jim Clark, therefore, became the benchmark around which I judged everything in motor sport: attitude of drivers, approach of drivers, teams, cars, livery… whatever it is, circuits… I always think: 'What would Jimmy think here? What would Jim Clark have done there?' He’s still
 the main man for me.'


Nigel Roebuck touches on what I think is the most startling aspect of Jim Clark's driving that lives on through the footage of him - the almost serene quality of his handling of the car. How jarring it is to what the steering wheel being gently glided this way and that, and then to look at the landscape outside the car whizzing past at what looks like lightspeed.
 

NR: 'Jimmy’s skill was a mysterious thing to me. I’d grown up watching – and worshipping – Stirling Moss and always thinking: "What does he do that the others don’t? Why is he just plain better than the rest?"
'You could watch him and he was silky-smooth and everything else, but beyond that, where was he making up the times? Because it wasn’t obvious. It was the same sensation watching Jimmy – you watched what he did and you could obviously see that he did it supremely well, but what was difficult to tell with Jimmy was where he made up the time.'



#567 Tim Murray

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Posted 09 April 2018 - 10:58

Nigel Roebuck touches on what I think is the most startling aspect of Jim Clark's driving that lives on through the footage of him - the almost serene quality of his handling of the car. How jarring it is to what the steering wheel being gently glided this way and that, and then to look at the landscape outside the car whizzing past at what looks like lightspeed.


This reminds me of Jabby Crombac's story about being driven by Jim in Pierre Bardinon's Ferrari P4 at Pierre's private track (as recounted in Graham Gauld's Jim Clark: Portrait of a Great Driver) :
 

First of all he took his girl friend round in the Ferrari. Then it was my turn. It is a funny thing, I have often been driven by Jimmy and have got no impression of speed. I thought while we were going round that it was good of him not to frighten me, and when we stopped I told him it was very nice of him to take me round so gently - I was so sure he had been about five seconds a lap slower than when he took his girlfriend round. Jimmy just laughed and Pierre came up and told us we had broken the lap record.



#568 SophieB

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Posted 09 April 2018 - 11:05


The great Jim Clark was killed 50 years ago today during an F2 race at Hockenheim . He is my… https://www.instagram.com/p/BhQhTrjF2cX/ 

 

  • 6EmSSao.png

Maurice Hamilton: 50 years on. Remembering the day motor racing lost Jim Clark

 

F1 followers of a certain age will remember exactly what they were doing on this day 50 years ago just as surely as a younger generation will have painful recall of 1 May 1994 and the loss of Ayrton Senna. I can easily visualise that cream Bakelite telephone with its dial, sitting on the table at home as I took the call on 7 April 1968.

It was a moment that changed everything. If it could happen to Jim Clark, then no one was immune. That message still holds true. The difference now is that you no longer have to wait half a day for confirmation of one of this wonderful sport's most terrible realities.

 

 



#569 Doug Nye

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 17:02

https://www.goodwood...ince-he-passed/

 

DCN    :blush:



#570 Tim Murray

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 17:42

Thank you Doug, much appreciated.

#571 Nick Planas

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 19:06

No need to blush - what a fabulous article and tribute. I echo Tim's thanks, Doug.



#572 SJ Lambert

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 19:38

Bril’, thanks Doug.

#573 MCS

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 20:11

Wonderful piece, DCN.

 

Just noticed this fabulous post on Racing Comments from Dunc: "New Documentary on Jim Clark"  -  http://forums.autosp...rk#entry8312643

 

Here is the TV link (probably for those only in the UK, unfortunately)  -  http://www.itv.com/n...ic/border-life/



#574 Vitesse2

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 22:44

Wonderful piece, DCN.

 

Just noticed this fabulous post on Racing Comments from Dunc: "New Documentary on Jim Clark"  -  http://forums.autosp...rk#entry8312643

 

Here is the TV link (probably for those only in the UK, unfortunately)  -  http://www.itv.com/n...ic/border-life/

I linked to both episodes above. Not just UK!

 

http://forums.autosp...11#entry8301875 et seq ...



#575 JtP2

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 01:48

Re the photo with the little girl. I don't think the photo was taken at Hockenhiem. Looking at other photos taken at Hockenhiem, the colour of the car looks wrong. All the B&W photos have the red coming out as gray, but the car in the photo looks nearly black (green). So I think it's a 67 photo when the 48s were green. Looking at some of the photos in the Beaky Sims article, there is a photo of Clark sitting in the car and his demeanor and dress don't really match the photo. he looks really cold and fed up. Strangely enough it was a beautiful sunny day in Scotland.



#576 ed holly

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 04:13

Some years ago a work colleague gave me this photo he took from a day when he went with Jim testing somewhere in the USA - he did tell me where but I can't remember, maybe someone will recognize the venue. His name was Paul Glasser and had little interest in motor racing, just took a picture of his mate in his racing car. Paul although an Aussie was at one time Vice President of PanAm and his marketing skills were about 10 levels above my understanding. Sadly he passed away a few years ago.

 

Paul_Glaser_photo.jpg


Edited by ed holly, 14 April 2018 - 05:54.


#577 Tim Murray

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 05:05

The Lotus 48 driven by Clark at Barcelona and Hockenheim was a new chassis, R4. It was fitted with the ‘double hoop’ roll bar as used on the 49, and clearly visible in the photo with the little girl. My understanding is that this was the only 48 chassis to feature the ‘double hoop’, with the others having a single hoop and rear-facing bracing strut. Thus the photo would have to have been taken at either Barcelona or Hockenheim in 1968.

#578 cooper997

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 04:35

Footage from Duns put together by Bob Holland over on the Lotus Cortina Mk1 facebook group

https://www.facebook...?type=2

 

Stephen



#579 ellrosso

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 05:50

Here's to you Jim. Thanks for the memories. May your legend live on for many years to come.903-_H-_Clar-68-lo.jpg



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#580 Glengavel

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 10:18

Who were the mechanics at Hockenheim in 1968? I've read in one article that it was Dave Sims and Mike Gregory, and Graham Hill formally identified Clark's body, and in another that it was Jim Endruweit and Dave Sims, and Endruweit had to identify Clark.

http://www.racer.com...ot-s-final-race

https://www.goodwood...ince-he-passed/

(not intending to impugn the good name of either Mr Sims or Mr Nye...)

#581 Gary C

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 11:05

it was certainly Beaky Sims and Mike Gregory ('Carnoustie') were mechanics that day. Graham identified the body. In fact, in Beaky's manuscript for his book, in regard Hockenheim, there isn't one mention of Jim Endruweit in there, I'll ask him when I speak to him later today.



#582 kayemod

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 11:42

 

An excellent article, I saw him race, but I never met Jimmy, though I worked with a lot of people who'd known him. I particularly liked Doug's writing here though, as it sums up Colin Chapman better then anything else I think I've seen in print. I only knew the Old Man as a fairly junior Lotus employee, but working on the Hethel based work that interested Colin the most, I saw him most days he was in the factory. He was more impressive in the flesh than I've usually seen in print, and the article does get that point.

 

Both Colin and Jimmy were truly remarkable men, though each of them in their own very different ways.



#583 Gary C

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 14:33

OK, have just spoken with Beaky. R4 was a new chassis for Barcelona, so Hockenheim was only its' second race, it never even did any testing.  Jim Endurweit was at the meeting but only from the evening before the race, the full race team consisted of Beaky and Carnoustie; mechanics,  Jim Endurweit Team Manager plus Jimmy and Graham.


Edited by Gary C, 15 April 2018 - 16:13.


#584 Doug Nye

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 18:38

Thank you Gary.  And it's Endruweit.

 

DCN



#585 Seppi_0_917PA

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 19:26

OK, have just spoken with Beaky. R4 was a new chassis for Barcelona, so Hockenheim was only its' second race, it never even did any testing. Jim Endurweit was at the meeting but only from the evening before the race, the full race team consisted of Beaky and Carnoustie; mechanics, Jim Endurweit Team Manager plus Jimmy and Graham.

One minute into the British Pathé film, Graham Hill and 3 mechanics carry off the wrecked chassis. I'm no expert but none of the mechanics look like Jim Endruweit. Am I wrong? (I recall photos of him at Hockenheim so I'm not saying he wasn't there but rather maybe there is yet another (overlooked) team member present?)

https://www.youtube....h?v=fyMD9HodD9w

Edit to add...in this video of the day, at 8 seconds, Jim Endruweit is not wearing a mechanic's jump-suit/overalls like the 3 mechanics in the British Pathé film above:

https://www.youtube....h?v=asb92E8HU8s

#586 Gary C

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 20:08

Thank you Gary.  And it's Endruweit.

 

DCN

D'oh!  Thanks Doug.



#587 Gary C

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 20:10

One minute into the British Pathé film, Graham Hill and 3 mechanics carry off the wrecked chassis. I'm no expert but none of the mechanics look like Jim Endruweit.


That's because they're not Team Lotus mechanics, they must be from other teams helping out. Beaky and Graham are certainly both in shot.

#588 Seppi_0_917PA

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 23:16

That's because they're not Team Lotus mechanics, they must be from other teams helping out. Beaky and Graham are certainly both in shot.


Okay, thanks!

#589 JohnH

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 01:52

I’ve seen pics of Endruweit and Clark conferring that day with Clark in the cockpit looking up at him. They were online , now of course I can’t find them.

#590 Tim Murray

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 05:02

It’s Sunday 7th April again ...

On their ‘On this day in past years’ slot BBC Radio 4 just did a short piece on Jim’s death, including a clip of him speaking about possible retirement. It was good to hear his voice.

#591 jimclark

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 07:01

I have endured another year without the greatest  :clap:  but his memory lives on.

 

(I've stopped mourning his loss and have started celebrating his having lived)



#592 Nick Planas

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 08:22

I have a show rehearsal today - am wearing my Jim Clark Trust T-shirt in the band pit - they all understand...



#593 Pat Clarke

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 08:31

I was in Uni in the UK at the time.

I starkly remember the newscast that fateful day and my housemates making fun of my tears :-( 

They just didn't understand,

Here 51 years later and I am again close to tears..

 

RIP Jim Clark

 

edit to correct the years. 51! Over half a century :-(


Edited by Pat Clarke, 07 April 2019 - 12:33.


#594 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:31

I was in Uni in the UK at the time.

I starkly remember the newscast that fateful day and my housemates making fun of my tears :-( 

They just didn't understand,

Here 41 years later and I am again close to tears..

 

RIP Jim Clark

It's hard to credit, but it's actually 51 years...



#595 Myhinpaa

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:21

I’ve seen pics of Endruweit and Clark conferring that day with Clark in the cockpit looking up at him. They were online , now of course I can’t find them.

 

A different one was for sale on eBay recently.

 

https://www.ebay.co....em=323690845931

 

In this short clip Beaky is checking the LH Rear wheel on Jim's car, completely unrelated to what happened later of course.

 

http://footage.frame...-clark-pit-lane

 

Very sad to think what happened just after, proves how precious and fragile life is, and how random circumstances can decide the outcome.



#596 jj2728

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 12:12

51 years, I remember that day as if it were yesterday. We were sitting in the kitchen having breakfast when the news came over the radio.

RIP Jim



#597 E1pix

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 14:31

Thanks for your last decade, Jim,

Still alive, over five later.