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The Sitges-Terramar circuit


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#1 Dennis David

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Posted 23 June 2000 - 20:47

Any ideas?

WE ARE LOOKING FOR ANY INFORMATION PICTURES-DOCUMENTS, ARTICLES ANYTHING! ON THE SITGES-TERRAMAR CIRCUIT BUILT IN 1922 IN SITGES SPAIN. DO YOU OR YOUR READERS HAVE ANYTHING THAT CAN HELP US FOR A RESEARCH PROJECT ON THIS TRACK. WE ARE INTERESTED TO PURCHASE THIS HISTORIC SITE, AND RESTORE IT TO IT'S FORMER GLORY... ANY HELP WILL BE WELCOMED. Regards, Peter Schomer President CEO Powertech Engineering SA. Motorsport Resort SA.



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#2 Barry Lake

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Posted 24 June 2000 - 08:23

The best I can do, off the top of my head, is that Jenks once wrote about Sitges in his Letter from the Continent (or whatever he called it) in Motor Sport. He was in the area and went to see the circuit, being surprised to find it was still virtually intact.
Sorry, I can't give even a clue to when he might have written this.
If anything else pops out of my memory, I will let you know.
It would, of course, be in Encyclopaedia of Motor Sport, in the circuits section.

#3 Dennis David

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Posted 24 June 2000 - 15:05

I looked, it's not.

#4 KzKiwi

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Posted 24 June 2000 - 19:59

There is a fleeting reference to it in Joe Sawards book called "The world atlas of Motor Racing".

Essentially it mentions that the track was built in 1922 and was a banked track. It staged the second ever running of the Spainish GP in 1923, won by Alberto Divo in a Sunbeam. This appears to be the tracks only claim to fame as the GP was moved to San Sebastian in 1926 (I presume there was a 2 year sabbatical between GPs). The entry also goes on to state that the track was used very little.

Earlier races held in Sitges included the Catalan cup raced in 1909 and 1910, both won by Jules Goux in a Peugeot. The way the paragraph is worded it appears that this was the first known form of racing in Spain. After these early races it appears that the racing activities transferred to another area of Spain, where the first Spainish GP was held in 1913, before returning to Sitges when the Sitges-Terramar track was built.

Incidentally, the book states that this first GP was run in Guadarrama to the North-West of Madrid and was won by a Rolls Royce!

#5 Francis

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Posted 25 June 2000 - 00:51

Bill Boddy wrote a story in the March 2000 issue of 'Motor Sport' (pg 92-93).

It states that the opening meeting was held on 28 October 1923. The event was for 2-litre GP cars and was won by Albert Divo in a Sunbeam at 96.91 mph.

The circuit is also mentioned in Valerio Moretti's 'When Nuvolari Raced' (Pg 20 & 81-82). Nuvolari competed in a 350Km motorcycle race on 29 October 1923 there and in a 600Km Voiturette race on 4 November.

Moretti's book describes the circuit as 2km in length.

#6 Ray Bell

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Posted 25 June 2000 - 02:54

One would assume, then, that a road circuit was used in the area prior to WWI, then the circuit built for that 1923 opening. Yes, interesting that a Roller won a GP! You could win bets on that... it beat a de Dietrich and another Roller at an average speed of 54 mph.
GP Racing Facts & Figures also gives two Voiturette Cup results, both in 1923 (was it perhaps a race in two classes), Tazio figuring in neither the 1100 or 1500cc results.
It is from this source, too, that we can plainly see that the 1909 & 10 races were on a different circuit, the average speed being a mere 35.9mph for the first, none being given for the second. The 1923 GP, however, was won at a speed of 96.91 mph, which was probably the fastest GP speed recorded to that time (come on, someone prove me wrong - I haven't checked), with San Sebastian speeds dropping to 76.88 in 1926, rising again to 101.92 in the mid thirties.
'Continental Notes' and 'Letter from Europe' were the headings Jenks used, BTW, Barry. Hope someone can dig up a date on that issue, I'd love to re-read it (my memory has failed me on this one).

#7 Darren Galpin

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 13:05

sitges.jpg' alt='Posted Image' />

From: http://www.silhouet....cks/sitges.html


The construction of the Sitges-Terramar circuit in 1922 caused all existing Spanish tracks to become obsolete, Frick Armangue being the constructor. Armangue founded a company called Autodromo Nacional, S.A. and made the architect Jaume Mestres responsible for designing the track. The other facilities were designed by Josep Maria Martino. Construction took 300 days with a final cost of 4 million pesetas. The racing circuit had a length of 2 km, the width varying from 18 to 22 m, with the banked curves having an interior radius of 100 m.

The venture was not financially sound, and the distance from Barcelona caused additional difficulty. The rapidly escalating performances of racing vehicles soon resulted in the track becoming insufficient for the requirements of racing, and after the takings of the first meetings were seized by the constructors, making it impossible to pay the prizes, international races were prohibited.

In 1925 the track was virtually abandoned, but the Catalunyan Automobile Club and the Penya Rhin started to run it, although without much success. Edgard de Morawitz purchased the track at the beginning of the 1930s, and in 1932 the Spanish Track Motorcycling Championship was held, and in the 1950s a speed race of the VI "Volta a Catalunya" competition. After these events, the Sitges motor racing circuit was completely abandoned.


#8 Marco94

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 13:29

Adriano Cimarosti also mentions the track in his "Complete history of Grand Prix Racing." Apparently the track had very poorly designed bankings. The book also contains one picture of the track.

Marco.

#9 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 13:33

Nicely done, Darren... do you have anything on the 1909 circuit? I appreciate that even this may have been different to the 1910 circuit, as there is no average speed given for the second race...

#10 Darren Galpin

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 13:51



The Guadarrama race details I have are:-

1913 - Guadarrama

1. C.de Salamanca Rolls Royce 86.89kph/54.00mph
2. Marquis de Aulencia de Dietrich
3. E.Platford Rolls Royce



The earlier Sitges track was not in Sitges, but down the coast in Tarragona:-

Posted Image

From: http://www.silhouet....s/tarragon.html

The two first events of the "Copa Catalunya", held in 1908 and 1909 took place in the so-called Baix Penedès circuit. Its 27.885 Km. route traced the roads that link Sitges - Sant Pere de Ribes - Canyelles - Vilanova i la Geltrú - Sitges. This very route served for the first Penya Rhin races, held in 1916 and 1919.

The poor condition of the tracks and the sinuosity of the route made it advisable to look for a new circuit for the III Copa Catalunya, held in 1910. On this occasion, the triangle formed by the roads that link Mataró-Vilassar de Mar - Argentona - Mataró, with a length of 14.9 km. This is the so called "Llevant" route on which the Spanish Championships for amateurs in 1911 and 1912 and the I Spanish Cup in 1912 were held.

In 1921, the Real Moto Club de Catalunya (RMCC) was able to organise the I Armangué Trophy for "autocyles" and chose the route formed by the roads linking Tarragona - La Secuïta - Vallmoll - Tarragona, with a length of 30.284 km. Between Vallmoll and Tarragona (currently the N-240) "there were long straights of more than two kilometres" to use the words of the time. The Armagué Trophy used this circuit in 1921, 1922 and 1923.

The Penya Rhin organised its first three grand prix (1921-1923) on the circuit formed by the roads linking Vilafranca - la Múnia - els Monjos - Vilafranca, with a length of 14.790 km.


#11 Ray Bell

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 14:59

No mention of those 1916 & 1919 races in Monkhouse & King-Farlow book... hard to believe they had a race in the middle of WW1.

#12 Dennis David

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 17:58

WOW! ; YOU HAVE BEEN BUSY;
I DID NOT REALIZE THAT SO MANY EXPERTS WERE AROUND...
THANKS FOR THE INFO WE ARE OFF ON WEDNESDAY TO SEE THE TRACK GO TO THE CITY AND PLANNING DEPT. TO TRY TO GET INFO...I RECEIVED A INTERESTING MESSAGE TODAY THAT THE KING AT THAT TIME WAS THERE TO SUPPORT THE FIRST RACE AND THE SECOND YEAR THEY BUILT A RAIL-LINE FROM BARCELONA SO FANS COULD GET TO THE TRACK, AS AT THAT TIME THE ROAD TO THE CIRCUIT (Villanova Road) WAS SO DANGEROUS SOME PEOPLE DID NOT MAKE IT TO THE RACE...THAT ROAD IS STILL THERE, AND I DROVE IT, IT'S A MORGAN OWNER'S DREAM...
THANKS AGAIN, THIS PROJECT IS STARTING TO GET INTERESTING...
WHY HAS NOBODY LOOKED INTO IT BEFORE?

Regards,

Peter Schomer
Autodromo Nacional SA. (We went ahead and registered the old orginial company name)...

#13 Ray Bell

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Posted 27 June 2000 - 00:14

I certainly hope you told him we expect him to become a regular on the forum...

#14 Dennis David

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Posted 27 June 2000 - 14:09

----- Original Message -----
From:"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2000 2:00 AM
Subject: More Sitges stuff,


I just re-read that R&T article by Cyril Posthumus. The old photos were supplied by Dick Lewis(of the banking) and Taso Mathieson(of the front straight and grandstands). There is a photo in "the Power and the Glory" by William Court(Dario Resta,Sunbeam,grandstands)but it is uncredited.

T.A.S.O. Mathieson and Dick Lewis are both involved with the Brooklands Society http://www.brooklands.org.uk/intro.htm and may have these and other photos available. Posthumus died, but I'll guess Doug Nye has his photos etc.

Also contact the Catalunyan Auto Club http://www.racc.es/indexeng.php3 and the Barcalona track http://www.circuitcat.com/

Gerry Measures


#15 Roger Clark

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Posted 28 June 2000 - 06:21

Sitges was one of a number of purpose built tracks opened in continental Europe at that time, others being Monza, Monthlery near Paris and Miramas near Marseilles. Part of the intention was to cash in on the great popularity of racing, by being able to charge for adnission for the first time. It marked the replacement of the open road circuits by permanent "motor racing facilities" a trend which seems vaguely familiar. Although completely different in character, the Nurburgring was part of the same trend.

Few of these tracks were commercially successful, even Monza lost money initially. Miramas was the scene of the most farcical Grand Prix of all time, the 1926 French GP when only three cars, all Bugattis, turned up.

Sitges was first used on 28 October 1923, by the son of the King of Spain. THe first race was the first true Gran Premio d'Espagne and was won by Albert Divo in a Sunbeam of the type with which Segrave had won the French GP earlier in the year. THe race featured a close battle between the Sunbeams and a team of american Miller 122s, Divo eventually won by under 2 minutes from Count Zborowski, a very small winning margin for the time. This was one of the few successful races by Miller cars in Europe.

A week later (4 November) a voiturette (1500cc) race was held. It was won by Dario Resta on a Talbot, which was produced by the same company, STD, which produced the GP winning Sunbeam. Nuvolari drove a Chiribiri in this race and finished fourth. A number of cars appear to have competed in both the GP and the Voiturette race.

Between the two was a Cyclecr race which had classes for both 750 and 1100cc cars. THe race was started on the 1 November, but had to be abandoned due to bad weather. It was re-run on the 4th, before the Voiturette race. It was won by robert Benoist driving a Salmson. Benoist, of course went on to be won of the greatest 1920s drivers, winning every major race in the 1927 Delage, before being killed in heroic circumstances by the Gestapo during the second world war.



#16 Ray Bell

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Posted 28 June 2000 - 07:38

Attempts to build such institutions in this country also met with varied success. Maroubra was the obvious one, a concrete saucer of less than a mile. It developed a reputation as a bit of a killer, especially when one of the favourites (and apparently a man of no mean skill), Phil Garlick, went over the top in an Alvis. It went through a succession of ownerships and receiverships and was dead inside a decade.
In Perth, Brooklands was a novel name for a little tri-oval sort of place, where they made the mistake of running the first events before a fence was put up... income therefore suffered somewhat. It faded quickly, too, but it was really a late-depression job.
Back in the twenties again, another high-banked job was started at Werrington, now a Sydney outer Suburb, right on the same railway line that led to the successful one-mile oval at Penrith, but it was never finished.
In Melbourne there was Aspendale in pre-WW1 days, starting with a demonstration round the horse track in 1904, then a gravel track inside the horse track in 1906. This was reconfigured with a concrete banked track in 1919 or so, then reverted to a less solid surface in the twenties and was in operation up to at least 1938.
More like the subject at hand was the Motordrome, conceived in 1914 and set aside for the war, finally built a decade later with a concrete half-mile saucer said to be the lower half only of the original plan, which apparently included a very steep outer banking for the fastest cars. It was too narrow for cars, but they raced there, only for a while, while motorcycles were more suited. Racing went on at night with floodlights, but not for that long, the concrete was breaking up within ten years, so a smaller clay speedway was built in the middle and the embankment gave the spectators a better view.
All these efforts wasted!

#17 Darren Galpin

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Posted 28 June 2000 - 08:16

Ray - any chance of more information on these old ovals/tracks so that I can add them in to my list of tracks in Australia?

Cheers,

Darren

#18 Ray Bell

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Posted 28 June 2000 - 09:43

Very broad information (most of the above is taken therefrom) is available in Terry Walker's 'Fast Tracks' - published in 1995 by Turton & Armstrong in Sydney. It sells for $30 and covers some 110 circuits in Australia, with speedways included only if there is significant reason, such as crossover of competitors, influence, historical significance, etc.
The maps are all drawn from military aerial survey photography... but there is a small number of circuits not covered... only three or four. It is copyright, but I can talk to Terry if you wish... no guarantees on what he'll say.

#19 Vasco

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Posted 11 December 2000 - 22:59

I've just come across this thread and thought maybe the Nostalgics would enjoy these pics I took during my trip to Barcelona last June:

Aerial view:
Posted Image

Turn 1 (quite similar to Turn 2 I should say) :) :
Posted Image

The back straight...and the vineyards:
Posted Image

It's quite odd that such a glorious place in the past is now used by tractors as an access to the land.
However, every meter of track is still there.
What impressed the most there was how dangerous the turns are: a single mistake from the driver and the banking is there ready to launch you high up in the the outside or to smash you against the rocks on the inside.


...and this one specially fo Jarama :)

Posted Image

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#20 Ray Bell

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Posted 11 December 2000 - 23:11

Great pics, Vasco, great pics... maybe you've put them in at a resolution higher than was needed, so they take a while to download, but thanks all the same.
That really gives us an idea what the track was about, and the 'today' picture of the vineyards etc brings us to the reality.

#21 TonyKaye

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Posted 11 December 2000 - 23:50

Vasco,
Those are wonderful pictures. I have seen other photos of Sitges over the last 20 years, but had not fully appreciated how well the old track had fought off mother nature. It's in much better condition than Brooklands at a similar state in its life, so it should be much easier to restore.

I hadn't heard of AtlasF1 when this thread first appeared. Anyway that's my excuse for not digging into the magazines before.

*There was a reader's letter in The Motor of June 15 1974 with a photo taken that year.
*Bill Boddy wrote an article entitled 'Fifty Years ago - A New Race Track' in Veteran & Vintage July 1973.
*There was another picture of Sitges in Motorsport of June 1969.
*Another one taken in 1993 appeared in Autosport of 19 August that year. Trees, big ones, seem to be growing through the banking. Maybe it's just shadows.
*Patrick Ridley-Martin wrote an article titled 'Spanish Folly' in Thouroughbred & Classic Cars May 1985. More pictures of that time, one with a modern Renault or similar Econo-box going round the lip of the banking. The track looks in great condition.
*Cyril Postumus wrote an article,'The Dead Speedway', in Road & Track of Jan 1977. This has two pictures of the track in its heyday with races in progress.

He ends it, "The sole noises are the cluck of chickens and the occasional yap of dogs. The corpse of Sitges rests amid the trees with only a faded, barely legible sign with the legend Autodromo de Sitges to proclaim its long dead ambitions." In my opinion Postumus was one of the finest motor racing authors of all and he was an incredibly nice man too.

#22 jarama

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Posted 12 December 2000 - 00:01

Thank you, Vasco



#23 fines

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Posted 12 December 2000 - 20:53

Superb pictures, Vasco, many thanks :) :) :) :) :)

#24 Zanini

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Posted 13 December 2000 - 17:16

Wow, touching thread indeed...

Being a true motorsports fan and usually spending summers and weekends in Sitges, I’ve known that track since I was a child. I’ve been there lots of times in my mountain bike, and I can tell you that the banks are far more impressive than one can imagine from pictures. Max. banking angle is 60 degrees, allowing drivers to drive at 200 km/h without actually steering.

The tracks current state is a shame for every motorsports fan. My parents and friends can say how many times I’ve claimed spanish federation should buy the track and turn it into a historycal motorsports museum, or something similar, considering it’s in amazingly good conditions. Now I see my dream can come true! Hopefully!!

Well, after that bit of nostalgic blahblah, the most interesting point: There’s a whole book written about this track. About 120 pages filled with exhaustive data about the building of the track, how was Sitges’ life and society back then, a bit of history about other tracks (road tracks) used before Terramar was built, and a bunch of old photos of the track and races held there.

Bad news are: the book is edited locally by a small group of people (Grup d’Estudis Sitgetans) who works on historycal studies about Sitges, and it’s pretty difficult to find. In fact, I don’t know if one can find it out of the only bookshop in Sitges, which usually sells all the books edited by that group. Tonight I’ll check the exact name of the book (I’d say it’s “Autòdrom Nacional”) and the rest of the references, and I’ll try to post them tomorrow. Last bad news is that it’s only written in catalan.


#25 Zanini

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Posted 14 December 2000 - 11:19

The book’s name is “Autòdrom Nacional, vida efímera d’una gran obra” (more or less Autòdrom Nacional, the ephemeral life of a great building), by Antoni Mirabet I Muntané. Edited in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) by the own author in 1999. There’s no ISBN. The book’s length is 150 pages.

For those interested (if there’s any :)), it should be available at Sitges’ only bookshop (sorry I can’t remember the name right now), and maybe (I haven’t checked) at “La llibreria del motor” (well known motorsports bookshop in Barcelona).


#26 Accipiter

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Posted 14 December 2000 - 16:32

Stiges is also listed on Forix:
http://www.forix.com...=0&r=192358&c=0

Intersting to note that the fastest lap was set by Louis Zborowski in a Miller 122.


#27 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 04:46

I dug up this Sitges thread because it contains information needed in the Zborowski Miller thread just started today.

#28 Michael Müller

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Posted 09 April 2001 - 10:28

Originally posted by Ray Bell
I certainly hope you told him we expect him to become a regular on the forum...


I believe he is resp. was already.

http://www.atlasf1.c...nfo&userid=4237

#29 Milan Fistonic

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Posted 19 November 2001 - 06:46

This appeared in the March 1968 edition of Motor Racing in a column headed The Vintage Scene, written by V.V.H.

HAVE YOU SEEN IT?

Many British holiday makers on Spain’s Costa Brava must vaguely have seen mention on maps, pamphlets, buses, etc, of a place several miles from Barcelona, on the coast, called Sitges-Terramar. Some years ago I met somebody just returned from a Spanish holiday who said, wild-eyed, that he had actually stood on the steep banking of an old motor racing track there, and I had the pleasure in confirming that he hadn’t dreamt this, and that there was, in fact, such a circuit at Sitges.

That keen historian TASO Mathieson, currently living in Portugal, sent me two postcards of Sitges recently, ‘just to remind me’, and I am reproducing one here, showing the high banking which was the Achilles heel of this particular course. Hailed by its sponsor as ‘The most emotional speedway in the World,’ Sitges, which was shaped like a bean and was 1.25 miles round, was opened in October 1923 with a mixed meeting, highlight of which was the 250-mile race for Formula Grand Prix cars (they didn’t have F1, 2 and 3 in those days – just the Formula, which from 1922 to 1925 restricted cars to a 2 litres top capacity).

The race was, in fact, called the Gran Premio de Espana, making it a forerunner of the F1 event held last October at Jarama, and due to be repeated this coming May as a World Championship qualifier. But the 1923 ‘GP’ at Sitges was, in truth, a bit of a flop, drawing only seven entries – two works six-cylinder Sunbeams of the kind with which Seagrave had won that year’s French GP, Count Louis Zborowski’s very fast straight-eight Miller, Clive Gallop’s 1.5-litre Aston Martin, a Diatto and two Spanish Elizaldes. Dario Resta and Albert Divo drove the Sunbeams, and the issue from the start lay between them and the Miller. Resta packed up at three-quarter distance, and Divo and Zborowski went at it hammer and tongs until the Miller, leading with two laps to go, had to stop for a tyre change.

That gave Divo his first GP win, and Sunbeams a lucky second ‘Grand Prix’ win, but win or lose, none of the drivers liked the track, complaining that it was highly dangerous getting on to the banking at high speed, then getting off again, and that it had been wrongly designed. They never held another big car race there, and even the motorbike events lasted only a few years before Sitges went into disuse. So older Spanish fans, like older British dittos, have their own particular “Brooklands’ to mourn, and I understand that Sitges speedway still lies there today, though in a far better state than poor old Brooklands with its gashed banking, litter of scrapped aircraft jigs and other Vickers detritus.

Not that Sitges would be any more use than Brooklands for modern racing cars. If the banked corners were difficult for the 110 mph racers of 40-odd years ago, how would today’s projectiles manage?

#30 Felix Muelas

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Posted 19 November 2001 - 23:22

Originally posted by Milan Fistonic
...was opened in October 1923 with a mixed meeting, highlight of which was the 250-mile race for Formula Grand Prix cars ...The race was, in fact, called the Gran Premio de Espana...That gave Divo his first GP win, and Sunbeams a lucky second ‘Grand Prix’ win


Of course that is perfectly incorrect.
The October 1923 race (held on the 21st) was the III Gran Premi de Voiturettes Penya Rhin, at the Circuit de Vilafranca del Penedés and that is the race that Divo won and that is described in the article. No Spanish Gran Prix, though.

The II Gran Premio de España was held on the 4th November 1923 in Sitges-Terramar, it was run to Voiturette specs and was won by Dario Resta. I think we have already addressed this subject before (or maybe it was just Hans and myself through emails) but IIRC this was the outcome.

Felix

#31 Hans Etzrodt

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Posted 20 November 2001 - 00:44

Originally posted by Felix Muelas
.....Gran Premio de España.....
.....I think we have already addressed this subject before (or maybe it was just Hans and myself through emails.....Felix

Felix,
You are probably the only one who knows which of the Spanish races are to be considered the true Spanish Grand Prix each year. Have you ever been able to sort out the contradictions? Or are you still waiting what Angel Elberdin had to write about this subject? The National title was also given to events other than Grands Prix. A rather confusing situation! On my list of Grand Prix Winners 1895-1949, I have titled the Spanish events for grand prix cars to the best of my abilities after working myself through the existing controversy. Any changes yet, Felix? :)

#32 HistoricMustang

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 23:07

Originally posted by Darren Galpin
sitges.jpg' alt='Posted Image' />

From: http://www.silhouet....cks/sitges.html


The construction of the Sitges-Terramar circuit in 1922 caused all existing Spanish tracks to become obsolete, Frick Armangue being the constructor. Armangue founded a company called Autodromo Nacional, S.A. and made the architect Jaume Mestres responsible for designing the track. The other facilities were designed by Josep Maria Martino. Construction took 300 days with a final cost of 4 million pesetas. The racing circuit had a length of 2 km, the width varying from 18 to 22 m, with the banked curves having an interior radius of 100 m.

The venture was not financially sound, and the distance from Barcelona caused additional difficulty. The rapidly escalating performances of racing vehicles soon resulted in the track becoming insufficient for the requirements of racing, and after the takings of the first meetings were seized by the constructors, making it impossible to pay the prizes, international races were prohibited.

In 1925 the track was virtually abandoned, but the Catalunyan Automobile Club and the Penya Rhin started to run it, although without much success. Edgard de Morawitz purchased the track at the beginning of the 1930s, and in 1932 the Spanish Track Motorcycling Championship was held, and in the 1950s a speed race of the VI "Volta a Catalunya" competition. After these events, the Sitges motor racing circuit was completely abandoned.


My lovely wife is out of town so I continue!

Henry :wave:

Posted Image

#33 BDM977B

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 12:48

Yes, easily seen on Google Earth, and accompanied by this reasonably new photo:
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/9873259

#34 chdphd

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 22:49

Someone has recreated the Sitges-Terramar circuit for rFactor. I made a wee video for fun. The track designer reckons it closed in 1956, so the Mercedes W196 could have raced there. But maybe not so many of them.

Click here for the video on YouTube

You can download the track from here: http://www.rfactorce...cfm?ID=Terramar

And the car from here: http://www.rfactorce....cfm?ID=1955 F1

#35 Manel Bar

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 15:59

Suggest you visit "Sitges-Terramar circuit:remakable survival"

#36 David Birchall

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 16:14

Perhaps Twinny can combine the two posts?

If he's not too busy photographing the roof of his Rover :)