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Specifications for Donald Campbell's proposed Bluebird CN8 rocket car


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#1 Franklin

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 04:19

(Courtesy Robin Richardson)

Length: 22 feet
Rear Track: 11 feet
Wheelbase: 12 feet
Height: 3 feet
Weight: 4,000 pounds
Power Units: 2 Bristol Siddeley BS605 RATOs
Thrust: 4,200 pounds each (8,400 pounds total)
Wheels: Solid Aluminum

http://www.users.glo.../cn8_n_coop.jpg

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#2 Wuzak

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 05:34

How far into planning/designing/construction were Donald Campbell's team before he died?

Any pictures?

#3 Franklin

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 05:55

Originally posted by Wuzak
How far into planning/designing/construction were Donald Campbell's team before he died?

Any pictures?


Some general configuration drawings were made but much detailed design work remained to be done.

A mock-up was built as well.

#4 dosco

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 15:35

Originally posted by Franklin
(Courtesy Robin Richardson)

Weight: 4,000 pounds
Power Units: 2 Bristol Siddeley BS605 RATOs
Thrust: 4,200 pounds each (8,400 pounds total)


Cool. What was the speed target?

#5 Franklin

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 17:18

Originally posted by dosco


Cool. What was the speed target?


Supersonic.

I think small is still the way to go, considering the downforce that can be generated at supersonic speed with wings of only a couple of square feet each.

#6 dosco

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 17:22

Originally posted by Franklin


Supersonic.

I think small is still the way to go, considering the downforce that can be generated at supersonic speed with wings of only a couple of square feet each.


Cool.

Smaller generally is better......

Imagine the possibilities today, with improved propellants, better materials (for structures), and better computer systems. A "clean sheet of paper" design, with all modern stuff, would be very cool indeed.