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#51 275 GTB-4

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 08:49

Originally posted by Nanni Dietrich
Reading some recent topics about Pukekohe (pook-e-k-hee or pew-kee-kew :D )

Thanks. :lol:


Pukekohe = Pook-ke-coe-hee (said fast)

DONOHUE...Donna-hew..or donna-ho
MOTSCHEMBACHER....Mosh-en-backer
LAUSITZRING
De BRUYNSERAEDE
STAEPELAERE
DJURSLANDRING
EGOZKUE
WALDEGAARD .....wall-de-gard
HOLOWCZYC
PALHARES
POSTLETHWAITE.....posel-th-wait (said fast)

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#52 ensign14

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 08:59

How about Jean Xhenceval? How on earth do you get a surname starting with Xh?

#53 uechtel

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 15:56

Originally posted by Nanni Dietrich


And what about Manfred von Brauchitsch :drunk: ... and Goetz von Tschirnhaus ?

I try: Manfred fon Broi-hi-ch... :confused:

:D



brow--it-sh and Göts (like French "boef") T-sh-ear-n-house

#54 Leif Snellman

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 16:22

WALDEGÅRD

It should rhyme with English word "cord".

KJÄLLSTRÖM

Czell-stroem starting like "Czech" and with an "oe" like the English "Ea" in "Early"





#55 Mihai

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 16:29

I never heard an English-speaking commentator to correctly pronounce "Klaus Niezwiedz". I think it's virtually impossible.

#56 ReWind

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 16:38

In fact it's easy!

First part (NIEDZ-) is "needs", second part (-WIEDZ) is "vits", "v" spoken like in Formula Vee, "its" like in pits or bits.

Unexplicably the first "ie" is long but he second "ie" is short. :confused:

#57 Nanni Dietrich

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 17:19

Originally posted by Leif Snellman


KJÄLLSTRÖM

Czell-stroem starting like "Czech" and with an "oe" like the English "Ea" in "Early"




Sorry, Leif: I've never seen Harry KJÄLLSTRÖM but just KÄLLSTRÖM.
What is this J after K?
:confused:

ooooohhh, wait a moment: I'm thinking to Harry KÄLLSTRÖM (great Lancia and Datsun driver)... perhaps there is some other Swedish KJÄLLSTRÖM I don't know...

#58 Leif Snellman

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 17:56

Sorry, "ian senior" asked "How about Kjallstrom?"

Both Kjällström and Källström are Swedish names or rather different variants of the same name and they should be pronouced the same way.

#59 gdecarli

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 18:11

Originally posted by Nanni Dietrich
LAUSITZRING

I don't know how to explain under English rules, but you're Italian as me, so we can understand.

I can't speak German and I know very few German pronounce rules, but as far as I know it's the nearly same as it would be pronounced under Italian rules. The only difference should be TZ, that should be simply Z. I think accent is on A

So I pronounce LÀUSIZ RING (to be read under Italian rules), but I don't know if it's correct.

Ciao,
Guido

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#60 uechtel

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 23:35

lou(d)-sits-ring - simply like that.

#61 WDH74

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Posted 25 January 2005 - 01:55

Isn't the "kj" sound pronounced "sh", like in shell? I recall reading that "Kjell Qvarle" (or however its spelt) is pronounced "Shell Kavarley". 'course, "Shell Kavarley" sounds like a really bad stage name to me.

-William

#62 Rob Ryder

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 20:56

I have just watched a documentary on Motors TV.. subject Beaulieu Motor Museum.
For an hour I suffered the 'voice over' telling me that Bow-lio was worth a visit, and that it was founded by Lord Montigo.
Don't these people do ANY research?

:lol: :lol: :lol:

#63 Rob Semmeling

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 08:25

I recently saw an Australian TV feature on Niki Lauda's accident at the Nürburgring. He crashed at Bergwerk, which became something like "Burkwurk" with a heavy aussie accent... :eek: :cat:

#64 macoran

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 22:20

Originally posted by Rob Ryder
I have just watched a documentary on Motors TV.. subject Beaulieu Motor Museum.
For an hour I suffered the 'voice over' telling me that Bow-lio was worth a visit, and that it was founded by Lord Montigo.
Don't these people do ANY research?

:lol: :lol: :lol:


Am I correct in thinking(having heard) that Beaulieu is pronounced Byou(as in Yes You !!!) lee ??
even if it does look and seems to be a French name ?

#65 Vitesse2

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 22:23

C'est vrai, Marc :)

#66 januszsz

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 06:07

I found it very interesting task to express some names under English rules of pronounciation.
HO£OWCZYC = hoe of chits ("i" should be like in English "it" and "ts" like in "tsar"- Russian emperor)
There was a works rally driver from Poland called CIECIERZYÑSKI or nowadays JWRC competitor KOŒCIUSZKO and they are very tough to explain!
Janusz

#67 roger ellis

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 19:37

As this thread has recently been bumped - & I'm new-ish around these parts - I thought I'd throw in one name that always seemed un-pronounceable to me, the Porsche 962 driver in the 80's - Eje Elgh.

Fair to say he's not from " round 'ere" ( oop north ) but in my mother tongue a stab at pronunciation is going to come out as "Eejay Elgar"

I am sure his mother had something more mellifluous in mind.

#68 David McKinney

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 20:13

first name "aya" (to rhyme with player)
second word "elzh" (the "zh" sound doesn't exist in English - but it's like the "j" of "judge" if you've been drinking)

#69 roger ellis

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 21:04


David, thanks for that.

:up:


#70 subh

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 11:53

Is that ‘zh’ anything like the ‘s’ in vision?

#71 David McKinney

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 13:07

Originally posted by subh
Is that ‘zh’ anything like the ‘s’ in vision?

Very similar, now you mention it ;)

#72 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 13:25

Sorry mates youre all wrong , its very simple....Eje ....Aya? no Aye! Elgh it is not Elch like german , so just Elg....seeeeeeeee....from Bjørn

#73 David McKinney

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 14:04

I was only going on what he told me ;)
And I can't see anyone suggesting it was Elch as in German

#74 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 14:41

Sorry to interlope , just wanted to help : I f you pronounce it ELGAR , leave out the AR and you got it right! Bjørn

#75 David McKinney

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 15:11

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
Sorry to interlope , just wanted to help : I f you pronounce it ELGAR , leave out the AR and you got it right! Bjørn

That's not what the man told me :cool:

#76 kayemod

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 17:27

Originally posted by roger ellis
As this thread has recently been bumped - & I'm new-ish around these parts - I thought I'd throw in one name that always seemed un-pronounceable to me, the Porsche 962 driver in the 80's - Eje Elgh.

Fair to say he's not from " round 'ere" ( oop north ) but in my mother tongue a stab at pronunciation is going to come out as "Eejay Elgar"

I am sure his mother had something more mellifluous in mind.


His friends all seem to refer to him as 'double egg', so I assumed that 'Egg Egg' was more or less how it should be pronounced. That's certainly simpler than some of the explanations I've seen.

#77 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 18:41

I pull my nose out.........................................


.

#78 kayemod

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 18:53

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
I pull my nose out.........................................

.


That sounds rather unpleasant, just where had your nose been?

#79 Barry Boor

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 17:33

Dug this out again to make what appears initially to be a very simple request.

Currently running an old South African Grand Prix (with slot cars) it occurred to me that I may be quite wrong in assuming that the name PIETERSE is simply a variation of the Anglo-Saxon surname PETERS; and as such, is pronounce as PETERS.

Then hearing something connected with rugby the other day, it dawned on me that it could in fact be pronounced PEE-ET-ERS, or even PEE-ET-ERS-EE.

Can any Boks supply the answer, please?

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#80 Hieronymus

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 18:09

Originally posted by Barry Boor
Dug this out again to make what appears initially to be a very simple request.

Currently running an old South African Grand Prix (with slot cars) it occurred to me that I may be quite wrong in assuming that the name PIETERSE is simply a variation of the Anglo-Saxon surname PETERS; and as such, is pronounce as PETERS.

Then hearing something connected with rugby the other day, it dawned on me that it could in fact be pronounced PEE-ET-ERS, or even PEE-ET-ERS-EE.

Can any Boks supply the answer, please?


Barry

The Pieterse surname surely had Dutch origins, but I think it means the same as the English PETERS.

Pronunciation differs quite a bit, though.

PIETERSE...rather difficult, but I'll try:

Pee - tir -suh

The first part must be said rather short, at least a bit shorter than the drawn out English attempt.

Middle part...remember to roll your "r" on the tip of your tongue.

Final part...also rather short.

#81 Barry Boor

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 18:36

Thank you; now when his green and gold Lotus is on the track I shall feel I'm not insulting him! :blush:

#82 Hieronymus

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 18:41

Also remember to get his first name right....not "Earnest", but more like Erins.

#83 Barry Boor

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 18:44

Oh! Not ERNIE?

#84 Hieronymus

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 18:55

No, no. Ernie is always a nickname. His real name is Ernest.

#85 D-Type

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 19:51

Seeing the thread about Sebring leads me to ask is it pronounced 'Sea-bring' or 'Sebb-ring'

#86 Barry Boor

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 19:53

I'm not American but I've always called it See-bring.

#87 Jim Thurman

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 21:14

Originally posted by D-Type
Seeing the thread about Sebring leads me to ask is it pronounced 'Sea-bring' or 'Sebb-ring'


Cee-bring

#88 cpbell

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 21:35

Neville Hay pronounces it "Say-bring" in some of his videos. :lol:

#89 stevewf1

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 22:45

Boy Hayje... : :confused:

#90 macoran

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 23:53

Must be Barry Hay then ?

#91 Jim Thurman

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 23:57

Originally posted by macoran
Must be Barry Hay then ?


"Candy's Going Bad..." :lol:

#92 Paul Taylor

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 02:42

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
Sorry mates youre all wrong , its very simple....Eje ....Aya? no Aye! Elgh it is not Elch like german , so just Elg....seeeeeeeee....from Bjørn


On an old video I have, I heard it being pronounced very similar:

Ay-ya Elg.

#93 Paul Taylor

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 02:43

Originally posted by stevewf1
Boy Hayje... : :confused:


I've always presumed it was pronounced "Boy Higher", or something like that. Don't know much about the Dutch language though.

#94 Paul Taylor

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 02:55

Originally posted by Nanni Dietrich


And what about Manfred von Brauchitsch :drunk: ... and Goetz von Tschirnhaus ?

I try: Manfred fon Broi-hi-ch... :confused:

:D


Manfred von Browk-itch :: Brow rhyming with growl, foul, towel :: Itch, being the English word for when you need to scratch yourself.

And:

Gerts von Churn-house.

#95 Bjorn Kjer

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 05:52

Post 93 : just leave out the "r" Paul !

Post 94 : Browhitsj would be the closest and easiest for a Brit I would say ! And the "i" is then pronounced like a single "e"

oe in Goetz is like ø in Bjørn , say "certainly" and take the pronouncement of the "e" and make the "z" an "s"

same on Tschirnhaus : pronounce the "i" like "e" and you get Ch"e"rnhaus.

Just helping!

PS. One thing that Brits and many others have trouble with regarding German is :

"ie" in German is pronounced "e"

"ei" is German is pronounced "i"

#96 sterling49

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 13:29

Originally posted by Simpson RX1
[
We English can be just as good at this............nothing to do with Motorsport (unless you count the fact it's not far from Brands) have a stab at Kent village Trottiscliffe......... [/B]


Would I get there via Meopham per chance? :lol:

#97 275 GTB-4

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 00:44

I have one of these computer accessories....it really has simplified my understanding of how to talk like a Pirate ;)

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#98 scheivlak

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 00:53

Originally posted by Paul Taylor


I've always presumed it was pronounced "Boy Higher", or something like that. Don't know much about the Dutch language though.

Well, it seems like you know enough :D

#99 Simpson RX1

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 01:34

Originally posted by sterling49


Would I get there via Meopham per chance? :lol:



It would be possible to get to Trozzlee via Meppum, just try not to involve Rootum, sorry Wrotham ;)

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#100 Paul Taylor

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 02:47

Originally posted by Bjørn Kjer
PS. One thing that Brits and many others have trouble with regarding German is :

"ie" in German is pronounced "e"

"ei" is German is pronounced "i"


That's providing you know how to speak German in the first place :lol:

Die sounds like "Dee" to an Englishman/woman and rhymes with the English words Pee, Free, Tree etc.

Vorbei sounds like "For bye" to an Englishman/woman, with the "bei" part rhyming with the English words bye, try, die, cry etc.