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#101 sterling49

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 10:32

Originally posted by Simpson RX1



It would be possible to get to Trozzlee via Meppum, just try not to involve Rootum, sorry Wrotham ;)


Giving travel directions can be fun in Kent, Rotham is an old favourite for quizzical looks :lol:

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#102 Barry Boor

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 10:40

Would I get to Meopham via Dwygyfylchi?

#103 sterling49

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 10:46

Originally posted by Barry Boor
Would I get to Meopham via Dwygyfylchi?


O.K.Barry, darn, I cannot even spell it, are you being facetious? :lol:

I do not even attempt the "Ll's" in Welsh Wales!! ie....Llanelli...... the languages of the British Isles, just amazing :wave:

#104 fines

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 11:17

Originally posted by Paul Taylor
Die sounds like "Dee" to an Englishman/woman and rhymes with the English words Pee, Free, Tree etc.

Vorbei sounds like "For bye" to an Englishman/woman, with the "bei" part rhyming with the English words bye, try, die, cry etc.

Very good, Paul! :up: :up:

Now everyone print that out and hang it next to your PC desk, so we will be spared such classics as "Blitzkreig", "Deiselmotor" or "Windschutzschiebe"! :lol: [to say nothing of misspelled German or Germanic names... :(]

#105 GeoffE

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 11:20

Originally posted by Paul Taylor


Manfred von Browk-itch

And:

Gerts von Churn-house.


Surely, the English pronunciation for the second word in each case would be fon.

#106 fines

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 11:23

Yes. And the "k" in Brauchitsch is not really correct, it's more of a Spanish "j".

#107 kayemod

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 11:44

Originally posted by GeoffE


Surely, the English pronunciation for the second word in each case would be fon.


True, but Paul's suggestion is about as close as we're going to get.

'Auf Deutsch', V is pronounced F, S is pronounced like an English Z, whereas Z is pronounced like our S, and W is of course pronounced like a V, and that's pretty much all you need to know. A German friend once told me "You Englisch vill neffer be able to pronounce our language korrectly, your moufs and troats do not haff zee korrect moofments". His countrymen all seem to understand me OK, so I gave up trying to perfect my accent after that.

#108 Paul Taylor

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 11:58

Originally posted by Barry Boor
Would I get to Meopham via Dwygyfylchi?


If I was going to attempt a pronunciation, it would be "Me-op-ham" and "Dwigg-ee-fill-chee" :p Don't know much about the Welsh language though! :lol:

#109 Barry Boor

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 12:13

Doo-ee-gu-vul-cee - the 'ch' is a problem because we just don't have the sound in English. A hard 'c' as in cup is marginally preferable to 'ch' as in church.

#110 ensign14

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 12:16

It's the ch sound in loch, a voiceless velar fricative. Like a rattle towards the back of the mouth.

#111 kayemod

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 12:17

Originally posted by Barry Boor
Doo-ee-gu-vul-cee - the 'ch' is a problem because we just don't have the sound in English. A hard 'c' as in cup is marginally preferable to 'ch' as in church.


I was rather hoping that a native German speaker was going to make an attempt on that one....

#112 fines

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 12:45

Some hope! :D

#113 Allan Lupton

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 13:02

Originally posted by ensign14
It's the ch sound in loch, a voiceless velar fricative. Like a rattle towards the back of the mouth.


Although this post looks as if it were only referring to the Welsh word in the post before it, it is surely also correct for the "ch" in Brauchitsch.

#114 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 13:40

Originally posted by Mickey


Adamich is a mix of adam and mitch...

My favourite is how Giacomelli became Jack O'Malley :lol:


Mine is how Tiff Needell became Tiffany Dell. I thought he'd had sex change surgery!

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#115 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 13:50

Then of course there is Tommy Hinershitz.

Let's see, "Tommy" as is the famous rock opera, "Hiner" rymes with "she took offense at my advances and gave me a real shiner" and "shitz" as in "God, I wish I hadn't eaten all those peaches!"

Bob Mackenzie

#116 Sharman

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 14:01

Back in the 70s when I was living in Florida my local meat market decided that they would open an English Pub. They asked my advice and chose a name which I suggested. The trouble was that when they had the sign made they would not believe that it was not correctly spelt. The name "LORD CHUMLEYS"!!!

#117 Alan Cox

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 14:10

Originally posted by cpbell
Neville Hay pronounces it "Say-bring" in some of his videos. :lol:



Dear old Neville has some very curious trademark pronunciations - a couple which spring to mind are "Cunnaught" for Connaught, and "Jagwah" for Jaguar.

#118 Allan Lupton

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 14:24

Originally posted by Sharman
Back in the 70s when I was living in Florida my local meat market decided that they would open an English Pub. They asked my advice and chose a name which I suggested. The trouble was that when they had the sign made they would not believe that it was not correctly spelt. The name "LORD CHUMLEYS"!!!

There once was a man called Colquhoun
Who kept as a pet a babolquhoun
His mother said "Cholmondeley
I don't think it colmondeley
To feed a babolquhoun with a spolquhoun"

#119 Barry Boor

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 14:29

:lol:

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#120 fines

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 14:48

I guess I can even read it, knowing as I do that you can feed a baboon with a spoon, but that it wouldn't be comely! Right? :D

#121 Vitesse2

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 15:20

Try this one, Michael .....

There was a young man from Salisbury,
Whose manners were quite Halisbury Scalisbury.
He would walk around Hampshire,
Without any Pampshire,
Till the Bishop insisted he Walisbury.

Jack Lafferty anyone?;)

#122 fines

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 16:21

Jack Lafferty is pronounced Jacques Laffite, but that poem has me stumped for the moment... :

#123 kayemod

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 16:42

Originally posted by fines
Jack Lafferty is pronounced Jacques Laffite, but that poem has me stumped for the moment... :


A little unfair to foreigners there, I'm not surprised that it got the response, "Da bin ich überfragt!"

An abbreviation for Salisbury often seen on road signs, and the old name for the city is 'Sarum', and in the same way Hampshire is shortened to Hants for postal purposes.

I'm sure you can work it out for yourself now. Alles klar?

#124 Vitesse2

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 16:48

Spoilsport! :p

#125 Allan Lupton

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 17:20

Originally posted by fines
I guess I can even read it, knowing as I do that you can feed a baboon with a spoon, but that it wouldn't be comely! Right? :D


I always think it is a sign of true civilisation to be able to cope with wordplay in a language other than one's mother tongue. :wave:

#126 fines

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 17:24

Originally posted by kayemod
Alles klar?

Danke für die Erklärung! :)

Speedy, you're mean! ):

#127 Sharman

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 21:52

Correct Fines, and when I was in Sebring County in 196something I was clipped for speeding, it cost me $100 and the State Trooper pronounced it Cee-brang

#128 Vitesse2

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 22:04

Okay, it was a bit unfair, but in my defence, if you google the first line there are only two results and the second gives exactly the same answer as kayemod did.

#129 fines

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 17:58

Was reminded of one recently which I was always uncomfortable with: Tom Bigelow, anyone? Is it as in "Nigel" or "big"???

#130 Jim Thurman

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 18:29

Originally posted by fines
Was reminded of one recently which I was always uncomfortable with: Tom Bigelow, anyone? Is it as in "Nigel" or "big"???


As in "big"..Big-uh-low (like saying Piccolo ;) )

Or the Deuce Bigelow movies. Sorry, to have brought those up.

#131 cpbell

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 23:03

Originally posted by Alan Cox


Dear old Neville has some very curious trademark pronunciations - a couple which spring to mind are "Cunnaught" for Connaught, and "Jagwah" for Jaguar.


I'd noticed the Jag-wah one before. :lol:

#132 jph

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 14:41

Originally posted by Alan Cox

Dear old Neville has some very curious trademark pronunciations - a couple which spring to mind are "Cunnaught" for Connaught, and "Jagwah" for Jaguar.



He tends also to vary the way he pronounces certain names. For example, his voice-over for the 'Motor Racing 1970s' video has Mad Ronald's surname pronounced variously as 'Pay-terson', 'Petterson' (as in 'better') and 'Pea-terson'; all within a few minutes of one another. Nothing like hedging your bets.

#133 Paul Taylor

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 16:08

Murray Walker and Martin Brundle used to change the pronunciation of driver's names as well.

Olivier Panis was called "Pannis", "Par-niss" and "Par-niece" (rhyming with cornice), while Pedro Diniz was called "Din-izz" and "Din-itz" and David Coulthard's name has alternated between "Cool-tard" and "Cool-thard".

I suppose we rely on the commentators to tell us how the names are pronounced and you can tell whether the drivers watch their own races on TV or not, because they tend to completely mispronounce the names of their peers frequently. "Kimi Ray-kanen", "Alex Wurts" (instead of "Vurts") and most commonly "Fisi-chella" and "Barry-chello" (like cello, the musical instrument).

American commentators seem to be the worst at pronouncing driver names. For example, at the 1982 Long Beach GP, the American commentators were calling the drivers "Jeel Veel-a-noove", "Alayne Proe-st", "And-rey-a dee Chess-arr-ees" and "KayKay Rose-berg".

#134 scheivlak

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 16:31

Originally posted by Paul Taylor
"Alex Wurts" (instead of "Vurts")

I would be very surprised if "Vurts" vould be the right pronunciation....

#135 fines

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 17:02

"Vurts" would be written Würz, so it's the closest you can get using English pronunciation.

#136 Sharman

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 21:56

Muddly Talker persisted in saying "Ayerton" claiming that Senna told him it was pronounced that way. The difficulty for old Muddly was that he could not get his tongue round the necessary Brazilian-Portugese inflexion. It would need a phoneticist to be able to write down the exact combination of sounds to say it correctly. Presumably Senna had said that it was not "Airton"

#137 scheivlak

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 22:23

Originally posted by fines
"Vurts" would be written Würz, so it's the closest you can get using English pronunciation.


The definite answer: http://namethatdrive...m/alex_wurz.asp

"I don't really want to tell you what my wife calls me" :lol:

From http://namethatdrive...lect_driver.asp

#138 Frank S

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 22:32

Originally posted by Paul Taylor

American commentators seem to be the worst at pronouncing driver names. For example, at the 1982 Long Beach GP, the American commentators were calling the drivers "Jeel Veel-a-noove", "Alayne Proe-st", "And-rey-a dee Chess-arr-ees" and "KayKay Rose-berg".


Oh, yeah?

If these guys want their names pronunciated properly, they should get a good, straightforward name like the ones The Voice of Latin America mentioned in a broadcast from Miami a few years back:

Par Neigh Yee Hone Ess

Ah Hota Foyt

There's a pair to draw to ...

--
Frank S

#139 macoran

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 00:23

Originally posted by Frank S


Par Neigh Yee Hone Ess

Ah Hota Foyt

There's a pair to draw to ...

--
Frank S


Ah!!! That's them Indy Race car chaps aren't they ?

Didn't Par Neigh Yee run an F1 team with Mareeo Anderetee driving at some time in da 70's ?

Think it was a VPJ4 or somewhat.

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#140 rx-guru

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 00:37

Originally posted by scheivlak
I would be very surprised if "Vurts" vould be the right pronunciation....

In English "Woorts" would come close. I remember that especially the Swedes used to call his father (the triple European Rallycross Champion) "Franz Wurst" or "Franz Korv" (for "Franz Sausage")… :lol:

#141 rx-guru

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 00:50

Originally posted by rx-guru

In English "Woorts" would come close. I remember that especially the Swedes used to call his father (the triple European Rallycross Champion) "Franz Wurst" or "Franz Korv" (for "Franz Sausage")… :lol:


Posted Image

Took that pic of Franz Wurz and Björn Waldegård during the 1984 Jänner Rallye in Austria. Björn drove the Audi quattro of Franz and they finished on second place overall behind Franz Wittmann (also Audi quattro).

#142 Jim Thurman

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 02:00

Originally posted by Paul Taylor

American commentators seem to be the worst at pronouncing driver names. For example, at the 1982 Long Beach GP, the American commentators were calling the drivers "Jeel Veel-a-noove", "Alayne Proe-st", "And-rey-a dee Chess-arr-ees" and "KayKay Rose-berg".


Keep in mind the commentators that you heard have trouble pronouncing American names too :D

#143 Allan Lupton

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:31

Originally posted by Sharman
Muddly Talker persisted in saying "Ayerton" claiming that Senna told him it was pronounced that way. The difficulty for old Muddly was that he could not get his tongue round the necessary Brazilian-Portugese inflexion. It would need a phoneticist to be able to write down the exact combination of sounds to say it correctly. Presumably Senna had said that it was not "Airton"


As I recall he called him "Air-ton" for many years. He must have actually met him (or another Portuguese speaker) later and been told that the first syllable was "Aye" (as in "Aye aye, sailor!") but I remember that the result was that in at least one race commentry he used both at once, viz. "Aye-air-ton".

#144 rx-guru

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:39

There are still some bloody German commentators that do not stop to call a pole position a pool position… :rotfl:

French commentators used to call Hans Heyer frequently Ans Eier (Ans Testicles)… :lol:

And once I heart a commentator (nationality forgotten) repeatedly saying Rakki Allakakki instead of Matti Alamäki… :drunk:

#145 bluelite

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 21:44

German commentators (RTL and DSF) say Robeirt Dornboos instead of Robert Doornbos.

#146 rx-guru

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 23:57

A very good Finnish friend of mine used to call Keke Rosberg always Roosberj, for rose hill. Most German commentators call him Rossberg, for horse hill. Strange enough to me his son Nico Rosberg is doing exactely the same: http://www.namethatd...lect_driver.asp :confused:

#147 fines

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 09:26

Wasn't Nico raised in Germany - on a diet of (puke!) RTL and some such?

#148 rx-guru

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 10:00

Originally posted by fines
Wasn't Nico raised in Germany - on a diet of (puke!) RTL and some such?

Good point, Michael! I know that Rosberg is actually a Swedish name and Swedes would also pronounce it Roosberj, with a long o and a soft g that sounds more like a j to Germans. If Keke was a true Finn his name would have been Ruusumäki, I guess… :D However, my Finnish friend was/is part of the Finnish rallying/racing scene and knows Keke (like many other Finnish car sport people) personally from the past. Therefore, I was surprised to hear Nico’s statement about his name.

#149 doc knutsen

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 10:03

Originally posted by fines
Wasn't Nico raised in Germany - on a diet of (puke!) RTL and some such?


RTL frequently refer to a Scottish driver whose name is Col-tart, with a rolling r and a hard t at the end.
The late Jo Bonnier's name was often pronounced Bone-ear in the US (at one time he was described as going through a shy-cane). Another good one if the habit of writing about this place in France apparently called LeMans..

#150 rx-guru

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 10:29

Originally posted by doc knutsen


RTL frequently refer to a Scottish driver whose name is Col-tart, with a rolling r and a hard t at the end.
The late Jo Bonnier's name was often pronounced Bone-ear in the US (at one time he was described as going through a shy-cane). Another good one if the habit of writing about this place in France apparently called LeMans..


Hi mate! Just saw that you are from the town of an old friend of mine, the late Thor Holm. About your compatriots: Martin Schanche, called Skanke, is over here mostly called Schansche, sometimes Skansche and sometimes Schanke. And people would love to hear Harald Sackweh (scrotum pain in German) instead of falsely spoken Sachweh… But by far the best thing I remember was that a truck of Tommy Rustad’s sponsor was stopped by the German police on the Autobahn to check its load. It had in huge letters written "Toten Transport" (it was understood as "body transport" by the cops) on its trailer… :cool: