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#651 Vitesse2

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 15:30

Thomson & Taylor at Brooklands were amongst the companies which refurbished parts from crashed German planes; in general these went to maintain the captured/crashed German aircraft operated by the RAE at Farnborough and by 1426 (EA) Flight, AKA the Rafwaffe.



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#652 Gary Davies

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 09:11

A certain serial frequent poster here threatens opprobrium for "...whoever cites the Daily Mail..."

 

Well here's a glorious* exception -  http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz4FzHYqgE1

 

*I refer to the photographs, not the copy. Even a speed read informs me there was apparently an aircraft manufacturer by the name of Messer-schmitt.   :rolleyes:



#653 Sharman

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 10:17

A certain serial frequent poster here threatens opprobrium for "...whoever cites the Daily Mail..."
 
Well here's a glorious* exception -  http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz4FzHYqgE1
 
*I refer to the photographs, not the copy. Even a speed read informs me there was apparently an aircraft manufacturer by the name of Messer-schmitt.   :rolleyes:


and most of the invaders were not Nazis

#654 kayemod

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 11:32

and most of the invaders were not Nazis

 

That's true, although the Nazis were indeed running the country before and during WW2, most Germans weren't party members, and conversely many who were members were not German. Nazi Party membership in 1939 was about 5 million, throughout the war numbers increased to reach a peak of around 8 million, that's maybe 15% 0f the total population. The Daily Mail has a Nazi/Hitler obsession, for them the term Nazi is applied routinely to any German in that period. It would be just as inaccurate to constantly refer to "Conservative Battle of Britain pilots". I only skimmed the article, but I'm surprised that Adolf himself doesn't appear to have been mentioned anywhere in it.

 

They're oddly inconsistent though. In a dug-up old article reprinted today on the Thames AA forts, the paper refers constantly to "opposition aircrafts" (sic), but I don't imagine that they are suggesting that the Messerschmitts etc were flown by members of the UK Labour Party.

 

If you put the photographer's name into Google, there's lots of interesting information on the equipment and techniques he used to get those remarkable images, all the better for being "hand-held"



#655 Bloggsworth

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 21:43

Apropos of making people jealous, my nephew has bought my sister a flight in the 2 seater Spitfire - Not cheap, and why should it be.

#656 Gary Davies

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 01:30

Envy goes nowhere near it! Your lucky skin an' blister. I hope she has a terrific time!  :clap:



#657 SJ Lambert

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Posted 09 December 2017 - 07:10

Temora’s Spitfire history

https://youtu.be/uLaXRzbYzqQ

#658 Bloggsworth

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Posted 09 December 2017 - 20:06

Envy goes nowhere near it! Your lucky skin an' blister. I hope she has a terrific time!  :clap:

 

She flew a Spitfire, which is more than our father did during WW2, a Hurricane, yes, Spitfire, no.



#659 moffspeed

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 20:28

Interesting stuff, as usual a motor sport connection is not too far away...

 

My late father passed away earlier this year, like most (genuine) veterans he remained very private about his WW2 experiences until the candle of life flickered. We knew that he had been a Surgeon in the R.N., thrust into the world of Atlantic convoys etc in his mid 20's but that was about it. However in his final months he talked to me at length about his other work investigating aircraft accidents (especially Hurricane and Spit) out of Naval and RAF airbases.

 

He seemingly worked intensively on harness design - both the original Sutton harness which was (arguably) the first ever quick release harness and also the later QK system which attached the harness to the (reinforced) aircraft's seat rather than the air frame for improved survivability. He could never understand my passion for motor sport but in a way his work mirrored this - but he never let on. 

 

Back in the 60's my journeys to school in dad's Ford Corsair always involved the elaborate checking process to confirm that the (very non-standard) Irvin seat belt was correctly adjusted. 40 years later I begun to understand why. 

 

Incidentally if you haven't seen the Alain de Cadenet Spitfire clip please call it up on You Tube, it really is a classic...



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#660 Roy C

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 06:57

 

Incidentally if you haven't seen the Alain de Cadenet Spitfire clip please call it up on You Tube, it really is a classic...

 

de Cad nearly becomes decap as Ray Hanna defines the meaning of low flying: https://youtu.be/4iOoiEbtf2w

(the clip includes some swearing, for ******* obvious reasons)


Edited by Roy C, 13 December 2017 - 06:58.


#661 Doug Nye

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 21:42

That sequence was being directed by our late friend Martin Stockham, of Gemini Productions, who was facing the same way as the camera - of course - and had his stills camera with him at the time. He bawled 'DOWN'! to Al and the cameraman just as he pressed the shutter release and took a remarkable head-on photo of the fast-approaching Spitfire, a print of which adorns our downstairs loo here at home.  Ray Hanna - with whom Martin had worked quite often - treated the entire thing as a huge joke.  Poor Al - who had in effect been attacked from the rear, unsighted - was entirely unaware of how close the prop arc would come to his head, and he wasn't perhaps quite so sure...

 

Ray Hanna was a risk taker, but a hugely experienced, capable and competent one.

 

DCN



#662 Glengavel

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 07:15

de Cad nearly becomes decap as Ray Hanna defines the meaning of low flying: https://youtu.be/4iOoiEbtf2w

(the clip includes some swearing, for ******* obvious reasons)

 

First time I saw that, I watched it over and over again trying to work out where the Spitfire actually comes from. It almost pops up out of nowhere.



#663 Charlieman

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 18:00

I just watched a documentary about a Spitfire excavation. The plane crashed after the engine overheated and the pilot successfully evacuated. It was reported that the Spitfire "screamed down". Would a Spitfire, presumably at lower than normal altitude on reduced throttle and assuming that the engine was rotating, make any noise before impact?



#664 Allan Lupton

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 07:56

I just watched a documentary about a Spitfire excavation. The plane crashed after the engine overheated and the pilot successfully evacuated. It was reported that the Spitfire "screamed down". Would a Spitfire, presumably at lower than normal altitude on reduced throttle and assuming that the engine was rotating, make any noise before impact?

In my opinion, it is the sort of language used by the current documentary-makers, rather than a well-researched comment. Where was the documentary to be found?



#665 Vitesse2

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 09:26

In my opinion, it is the sort of language used by the current documentary-makers, rather than a well-researched comment. Where was the documentary to be found?

I'm guessing it was episode 1 of Dig WW2 with Dan Snow, which was made by BBC Northern Ireland in 2012 and recently repeated on BBC4 - available on iPlayer for the next 14 days. From memory, I think the 'screamed down' comment was from the only surviving witness.



#666 kayemod

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 09:32

I'm guessing it was episode 1 of Dig WW2 with Dan Snow, which was made by BBC Northern Ireland in 2012 and recently repeated on BBC4 - available on iPlayer for the next 14 days. From memory, I think the 'screamed down' comment was from the only surviving witness.

 

 

I scream when I see the name Dan Snow, probably my least favourite TV presenter.



#667 Odseybod

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 09:40

Perhaps the airflow whistling? It could have attained a reasonable speed if plummeting near-vertically from (say) a couple of thousand feet. It must have been reasonably high if the pilot was able to bail out successfully.

 

I didn't think overheating was particularly common on the Spitfire once in the air, unless there was some damage to the cooling system (Allan may have a different view). Far more worrying was the sudden silence when the spur gear on the magneto drive failed, a fault the Merlin suffered from for a while. In which case the only screaming was more likely to come from the pilot, as a stream of naughty words directed towards Rolls-Royce.



#668 10kDA

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 10:44

I just watched a documentary about a Spitfire excavation. The plane crashed after the engine overheated and the pilot successfully evacuated. It was reported that the Spitfire "screamed down". Would a Spitfire, presumably at lower than normal altitude on reduced throttle and assuming that the engine was rotating, make any noise before impact?

Well, a glider makes a very noticeable sound, audible from a few hundred yards away, doing maybe 60 kts in the landing pattern so a much-draggier airframe like a Spitfire, at a presumeably higher speed, would probably make significantly more noise even if the engine was seized. "Scream"? Maybe?



#669 Charlieman

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 10:47

I'm guessing it was episode 1 of Dig WW2 with Dan Snow, which was made by BBC Northern Ireland in 2012 and recently repeated on BBC4 - available on iPlayer for the next 14 days. From memory, I think the 'screamed down' comment was from the only surviving witness.

Correct. The expression was used by the now elderly witness and repeated by the presenter. It seemed to me to be something that the production team might have diplomatically queried.



#670 GreenMachine

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 11:11

The pilot may have lowered the flaps to slow up, making his exit easier, and the canopy would be open, or jettisoned.  All of which, with the suggestions above, could lead to a whistling/screaming arising from the airflow.

 

Last week I stopped off at RAAF Williamtown to update myself on the Fighter World museum there, and while there spent some time on the observation deck.  The F35 may be a stealth fighter, but it sure whistles in landing configuration ,,,  :eek:



#671 elansprint72

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 18:58

The "round the world Spitfire" arrived back at Goodwood today! Well done to all involved.



#672 Ian G

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Posted 05 December 2019 - 22:56

Yeah,great adventure.My brother has been following their progress.

 

https://www.thesun.c...the-world-trip/



#673 Sterzo

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 21:17

A D-Day liveried Spitfire flew over the house today. Always a fine sight and sound.



#674 Steve99

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 10:18

A D-Day liveried Spitfire flew over the house today. Always a fine sight and sound.

 

I consider myself privileged to live a mile across the fields from RAF Coningsby. The sight and sound of the Lancaster, Spitfires, Hurricanes and Dakota - a few rare times all at once - is not uncommon in the spring and summer, and every time gives me shivers. Awesome sight. For any others interested, if you're ever in this part of the part of the world, pay a visit to the Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre, preferably on a day when they taxi their own Lancaster, 'Just Jane' and hopefully the Mosquito they have under restoration. It's a wonderful place.



#675 bradbury west

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Posted 08 December 2019 - 23:44

OT a little, but related.
BBC 4 9pm this coming Wednesday. Prof Alice Roberts, in her Digging for Britain series, covers the rescue of a Fairey Barracuda dive bomber which was found intact in 2018 when the National Grid carried out a seabed survey ahead at laying a new cable between U.K. And France. The programme carries a 4 star rating.
Roger Lund.

#676 Gary Davies

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 07:51

Well, a glider makes a very noticeable sound, audible from a few hundred yards away, doing maybe 60 kts in the landing pattern so a much-draggier airframe like a Spitfire, at a presumeably higher speed, would probably make significantly more noise even if the engine was seized. "Scream"? Maybe?


I trust this isn't too off-topic, but you remind me.

Several years ago the CFI at the gliding club asked me to do the 'Hangar flight'. That is the last flight of the day, normally as the sun is rushing down to the horizon and the task is to taxi the glider right up to the hangar rather than laboriously push it all the way from wherever on the field it might be.

We're talking rural Australia here and sheep grazing country. As all Strayans know, in dusty country sheep take on the same colour as the land they're scratching about on.

So there I am, just turned finals and it's getting really dark now. I'm at 150-ish feet. My approach speed was around 50 kts (90km/h). There's the hanger right ahead and all was going swimmingly until I noticed what initially appeared to be the ground ahead moving. Weird. I soon realised that a mob of sheep had got into our strip (we'd been flying about a kilometre away all day.) As I got closer some of them, the nearer ones, began to disperse.

At which point I twigged. The aircraft I was flying had flaps and airbrakes and they do make a noise on approach. The faster you go the more noise they make. So I smartly pushed the stick forward which increased the speed and levelled out perhaps 8 feet high. No problem with stalling because I was way above stalling speed and besides, I was getting some ground effect. But the effect on the sheep was miraculous, The greater noise from above caused them to move like the parting of the Red Sea. Brilliant. In no time flat, the way ahead was clear so I put in a whisker more airbrake, pulled up slightly and stopped in just the intended spot in front of the hanger. As I emerged from the aircraft, a car with a couple of anxious fellows arrived at speed. They'd seen the large cloud of dust as the sheep scattered. What they found was a glider pilot grinning from ear to ear. One of my most enjoyable flights ever.


Edited by Gary Davies, 10 December 2019 - 02:04.


#677 10kDA

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Posted 12 December 2019 - 15:54

At which point I twigged. The aircraft I was flying had flaps and airbrakes and they do make a noise on approach. The faster you go the more noise they make. So I smartly pushed the stick forward which increased the speed and levelled out perhaps 8 feet high. No problem with stalling because I was way above stalling speed and besides, I was getting some ground effect. But the effect on the sheep was miraculous, The greater noise from above caused them to move like the parting of the Red Sea. Brilliant. In no time flat, the way ahead was clear so I put in a whisker more airbrake, pulled up slightly and stopped in just the intended spot in front of the hanger. As I emerged from the aircraft, a car with a couple of anxious fellows arrived at speed. They'd seen the large cloud of dust as the sheep scattered. What they found was a glider pilot grinning from ear to ear. One of my most enjoyable flights ever.

:lol: Given the unlikelihood of going around, good thing they weren't cows or deer. Just asking - Grob Speed Astir?



#678 Gary Davies

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Posted 12 December 2019 - 22:33

We had an Astir and a Blanik at the time. Funny... I recall the landing more than the a/c. I'm pretty sure it was the Blanik. Probably was, they're a noisy old tin can at the best of times.   :lol:



#679 Odseybod

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 12:32

We had an Astir and a Blanik at the time. Funny... I recall the landing more than the a/c. I'm pretty sure it was the Blanik. Probably was, they're a noisy old tin can at the best of times.   :lol:

Ah, good solid Czech engineering. At Perranporth we aviated in a K-7 - great fun



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#680 10kDA

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Posted 15 December 2019 - 00:40

We had an Astir and a Blanik at the time. Funny... I recall the landing more than the a/c. I'm pretty sure it was the Blanik. Probably was, they're a noisy old tin can at the best of times.   :lol:

I asked due to hearing a Speed Astir with flaps and brakes out making much the same noise as a half dozen grade schoolers blowing through their "Snaps" boxes the morning after Halloween. :rotfl: