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The Pete Fenelon and Michael Catsch (Tuboscocca) Memorial Book Thread


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#8851 opplock

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 19:15

 I wrote a review for Speedreaders.info on the Redman book.To summarise - dreadful cover, awful title , brilliant book .

 

 

I agree about it being a brilliant book, despite ignoring the only time I saw him race in a single seater. Fair enough as it was in 76. The title is a bit tabloid for my liking. I thought the cover was rather 70s in style and the messy layout is a small price to pay for having that superb Targa Florio scene on the front cover. 


Edited by opplock, 19 October 2018 - 19:25.


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#8852 group7

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 01:07

Are we likely to see this in English, or were previous editions (in which I've been given to believe there were errors ?) available in English ?

 

https://www.abebooks..._-srp1-_-image1



#8853 chrisj

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 03:44

I've gotten some great recommendations from this thread in the past (everything from a history of stock car racing to Formula 2), so I'm asking for help again. I recently read a wonderful interview with Giulio Ramponi which got me inspired to read more about racing in the 1920's. Could anyone recommend a good book, preferably in English or Italian (or French)? I'm most interested the Alfa Romeo team personalities and stories of the races. Thank you in advance for any advice.



#8854 Vitesse2

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 07:16

Some of the recommendations here will probably help:

 

https://forums.autos...eference-books/



#8855 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 09:18

Luca Dal Monte's recent book on Enzo Ferrari 'Power. Politics And The Making Of An Automotive Empire' contains a lot about his time with Alfa Romeo in the 1920's and thirties with Ascari, Campari, Nuvolari, Varzi and Ramponi etc.



#8856 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 16:31

I've gotten some great recommendations from this thread in the past (everything from a history of stock car racing to Formula 2), so I'm asking for help again. I recently read a wonderful interview with Giulio Ramponi which got me inspired to read more about racing in the 1920's. Could anyone recommend a good book, preferably in English or Italian (or French)? I'm most interested the Alfa Romeo team personalities and stories of the races. Thank you in advance for any advice.

Hi Chris

 

Can you tell me where you saw the wonderful Ramponi interview?

 

Thanks

 

Paul



#8857 chrisj

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 16:48

Hi Chris

 

Can you tell me where you saw the wonderful Ramponi interview?

 

Thanks

 

Paul

Paul -- here you go: 

 

http://grandprixrati...iniscences.html



#8858 P0wderf1nger

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 17:31

Paul -- here you go: 

 

http://grandprixrati...iniscences.html

Many thanks, Chris - very helpful.



#8859 Eric Dunsdon

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 08:21

That's  a wonderful interview. Thank you for the link.



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#8860 Vitesse2

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 09:34

Many thanks, Chris - very helpful.

 

 

That's  a wonderful interview. Thank you for the link.

Indeed. Although I'm pretty sure he wouldn't have 'elected to be interned'. Just about every Italian citizen in Britain was rounded up in 1940 and almost all were interned long term - but not by choice. The 'protestations of his of his many and influential English friends' would only have come into play if he had appealed against internment - which a lot did, mostly unsuccessfully. So it's probably more correct to say that he declined to appeal. Even after the fall of Mussolini, those considered to be dedicated Fascisti were not released and others (considered less of a security risk) were directed into war work - Ramponi presumably fell into the latter group.

 

See the book Collar the Lot! by Peter & Leni Gillman (Quartet 1980).

 

Ramponi is mentioned here in the memories of a former Wales & Edwards employee:

 

https://web.archive....ales_and_edward



#8861 blackmme

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 12:43

I was surprised to see the newly released Haynes ‘Workshop’ Manual for the McLaren MP4/4 in my local Works shop (and online) for £6.
It is absolutely excellent (especially for a modeler) although it is with the Nicholls not Murray camp when it comes to the cars conception and design.

Regards Mike

Edited by blackmme, 22 October 2018 - 12:52.


#8862 Vitesse2

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 17:09

And in similar vein, once more donning my charity selling titfer, a mint, first edition, copy of the Haynes Lotus 72 manual - eBay item 253948136421. Yours for a tenner!

 

And SOLD! Again to a TNFer :wave:



#8863 chrisj

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Posted 27 October 2018 - 21:16

Luca Dal Monte's recent book on Enzo Ferrari 'Power. Politics And The Making Of An Automotive Empire' contains a lot about his time with Alfa Romeo in the 1920's and thirties with Ascari, Campari, Nuvolari, Varzi and Ramponi etc.

 

Thank you. A local library has this, so I've placed a hold.

 

Some of the recommendations here will probably help:

 

https://forums.autos...eference-books/

 

Thank you, I missed this thread when it was more active.



#8864 Colbul1

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 16:38

I just thought I'd mention a couple of new books that have recently come out and in my opinion would be well worth adding to any collection for they are good reads.

 

First up I would just like to say what an absolutely marvelous book 'Donington Park: The Pioneers' by John Bailie is.  I purchased a copy earlier this week and it is a fantastic read.  I have only ever been to Donington a couple of times, back in the 90s, and so this book has given that connection to the circuit that I totally missed before.  The pictures and maps are a delight, how they show the old course compared to the current, how and why the changes were made, and the best part, the reports on the races in the 30s.  For me, the book is worth every penny of the £85 cover price.

 

My second book, which I have read since the weekend, is 'Driven: The Men Who Made Formula One' by Kevin Eason (of The Times).  I have to say, in my opinion, the book is a cracking little read.  It has been crafted with that paddock knowledge gained over 20 years, couple to some superb and honest interviews with the likes of BCE, di Montezemelo, Mosley and Ron Dennis.  I have found some of the book most interesting, such as the section where Bernie says he engineered Lewis Hamilton's move to Mercedes for $32 million, when Dennis thought he had Lewis at $20 million.  At 385 pages there is a lot of information covering some background from the 50s to current day 2018 paddock.  At Amazon it is selling for £15.99, and again I would say well worth the price.

 

Colin



#8865 john aston

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 10:53

News on my book , which will be published next year by Veloce. The final title is DRIVEN : an Elegy to Cars , Roads & Motorsport . 

 

  It is partly motoring/motor sport biography ( covering everything from 60s hillclimbs to Nascar to F1 (ancient and  modern) and Ferrari ) and partly a detailed account of my 2017 season in UK motorsport . But it's not about runners and riders, results ,  fastest laps etc but it is about people , places and machinery. I cover everything from drag racing and Autograss , via VSCC trials and RAC speed hillclimbs to circuit stuff  (BTCC to HSCC - and even the weird world of Time Attack).   Foreword by Simon Arron of this parish .

 

More  on Veloce.co.uk and also now listed on Amazon     



#8866 Mallory Dan

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 13:02

Sounds good John, when its available?



#8867 john aston

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 07:40

It will be out late Spring I think- but no firm date yet. Will keep you posted.



#8868 MCS

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 18:28

Look forward to seeing this!  Good fun by the look of it and a shame it's not ready for Christmas, but even so.

 

Which reminds me, did you make it to the VSCC Lake District trial the other week?  Just curious, as when you mentioned it I thought back to a few decades ago when I fell across it whilst admiring the wonders of Buttermere and elsewhere - a glorious afternoon that I've never quite forgotten in one of the world's most beautiful places...



#8869 john aston

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 06:44

I did  indeed , and it was just splendid. The 2017 event was actually one of the highlights of my motorsport year , and gets about 3000 words in the book. A few too many Austin Sevens and not enough Brescia Bugattis perhaps , but still  a lovely event contested by marvellously eccentric people  in stunning surroundings. Wonder what a typical armchair effone fan would make of it all? 



#8870 MCS

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 13:22

Ha ha.  Excellent post, John!  Looking forward to seeing the book. :up:



#8871 Steve L

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 16:14

There seem to be lots of (hopefully) good books coming out at the moment about the smaller pre war manufacturers. This one will be on my to buy list

https://www.fonthill...-the-aeroplanes

#8872 Dick Dastardly

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 23:02

There's a new book, the life of Oliver Speight. He was the Competitions Manager of Dunlop in the early / mid 60s, supplying tyres to the works teams of the time....later on he ran the UK branch of Jolly Club, running Lancias in British and European rallies for the likes of Pat Moss-Carlsson....invented / created rallypoint at Ragley Hall, ......in more recent times he led[?] a group trying to buy Silverstone from the BRDC when the latter put it up for sale.  

Book is "Speight of The Heart" - proceeds go to the Mark Speight Foundation, a charity Oliver set up following the death of his son Mark.



#8873 D-Type

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 20:03

Veloce are holding an 80% off sale on certain titles.  For phone orders only quoting code EIGHTY18.  I get their email newsletter and it is probably necessary to sign up to get the offer.


Edited by D-Type, 07 December 2018 - 21:44.


#8874 Steve L

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 13:26

I received an offer to get 40% off the Marendaz book so took the plunge. Ordered Thursday and arrived today (good service!).

I've only had chance for a quick look so far, but it looks to be a most comprehensive and very well illustrated work. It is roughly A5 size and softback and excellent value for the £17 including P&P I spent.

I can also recommend "Archie Frazer Nash - Engineer".

#8875 DCapps

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Posted 10 December 2018 - 19:36


My second book, which I have read since the weekend, is 'Driven: The Men Who Made Formula One' by Kevin Eason (of The Times).  I have to say, in my opinion, the book is a cracking little read.  It has been crafted with that paddock knowledge gained over 20 years, couple to some superb and honest interviews with the likes of BCE, di Montezemelo, Mosley and Ron Dennis.  I have found some of the book most interesting, such as the section where Bernie says he engineered Lewis Hamilton's move to Mercedes for $32 million, when Dennis thought he had Lewis at $20 million.  At 385 pages there is a lot of information covering some background from the 50s to current day 2018 paddock.  At Amazon it is selling for £15.99, and again I would say well worth the price.

 

Colin

 

Out of curiosity, I bought this book and was very surprised how interesting it actually was. While scarcely much of a fan of the current F1 era (which I date back to around the FIASCO War period), it was actually enlightening for once, providing far more about the politics and so forth that takes place behind the scenes than is usually given any real coverage -- than again, may I just wasn't paying much in the way of attention, of course. Far better than the usual tripe on F1 that seems to be the standard fare.



#8876 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 02:30

What books did we receive for Christmas this year?

I received none, but I did receive the gift of finding out that Nathan Beehl has a new book coming out in a couple of months about the Ferrari 550/575 series.

#8877 Ralf Pickel

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 13:05

What books did we receive for Christmas this year?

I received none, but I did receive the gift of finding out that Nathan Beehl has a new book coming out in a couple of months about the Ferrari 550/575 series.

The Reid Railton by Ludvigsen, Maserati At Heart by Ermano Cozza and Schlumpf by the Op De Weeghs.

Plus, non motoring related, Erebus by Michael Palin.

So - a good Christmas !  :clap:



#8878 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 16:35

The Reid Railton by Ludvigsen, Maserati At Heart by Ermano Cozza and Schlumpf by the Op De Weeghs.
Plus, non motoring related, Erebus by Michael Palin.
So - a good Christmas !  :clap:


Congratulations, Ralf. You must have been a very good boy this year!

#8879 raceannouncer2003

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 06:40

My copy of KLEMANTASKI - Master Motorsports Photographer" (as requested no. 23/100) arrived today and in a word, it is astounding. Breathtaking photos, the colour shots are worth the price alone and Paul Parker's accompanying text make it a must have for anyone's motor racing library.

 

My eyes lit up when my son gave me my Christmas gift.  Looks great.  Up to 1938 so far, and already lots of color photos.

 

Vince H.



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#8880 Ralf Pickel

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 08:17

Congratulations, Ralf. You must have been a very good boy this year!

 

Oh well...don´t know about that..... :yawnface:



#8881 nexfast

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 17:46

What books did we receive for Christmas this year?

I received none, but I did receive the gift of finding out that Nathan Beehl has a new book coming out in a couple of months about the Ferrari 550/575 series.

 

Mostly given to myself by... myself (got some model cars and comic books from the family, can't complain):

 

- "Shutter and Speed" by Gary C.

 

- "Touring Car Racing 1958-2018 The History of British Touring Car Championship" (some very nice b&w  photos from the fifties and sixties and almost all in colour thereafter and a good companion to "60 Seasons" by Alex Burnham a book without photos which is a race by race description of the championship)

 

- "Les Inoubliables Annés 70, Les Voitures de Tourisme 1970-1974" (I'm very much in tin-tops this year or so it seems)

 

- "Stirling Moss's Book of Motor Sport", a curiosity from 1955

 

- "The Vanwall Story" by Louis Klementaski and Michael Frostick (bought originally at Galloway & Porter in Cambridge back in 1958 by 18 schilling, the receipt with the owner's name is still inside the book).



#8882 Biggles

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 18:13

I would like to recommend a new book - well, I would, wouldn't I. since it's just been self published?   :)

 

It's an A5 hardback in full colour on art paper -

 

"The story of the Batten Brooklands Racing Special and his drivers" with a foreword by Simon Taylor.

 

Jenks wrote on the subject of specials:

"This name applies to one-off cars that are the product of the fertile brain of the constructor. It is probably true to say that no special has ever been finished. It may be finished sufficiently to allow it to race, but inevitably the constructor will be planning further modifications while he is racing it ... ."  Directory of Historic Racing Cars, 1987

 

The book relates the stories of the Batten brothers who ran the Beckenham Motor Company in the 1920s and '30s,  of the Ford side-valve V8 upon which the special is based, of the building of the special and the modifications throughout its life, and of the owner/drivers, all six, the last of whom is in the 45th year of ownership.

 

The book is offered for £25 including post and packing within the U.K., £30 to the rest of the world.

 

There are more details and a couple of short videos of the car in action, on the website along with buying options.

 

https://www.battenspecial.com

 

Neil Bennett.



#8883 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 20:01

 
"The story of the Batten Brooklands Racing Special and his drivers" with a foreword by Simon Taylor.
 
https://www.battenspecial.com
 


Good luck with the book!



#8884 D-Type

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Posted 27 December 2018 - 23:09

What books did we receive for Christmas this year?

I received none, but I did receive the gift of finding out that Nathan Beehl has a new book coming out in a couple of months about the Ferrari 550/575 series.

I got Stephen South: The way it was by Darren Banks, which I'm looking forward to reading as it's had good reviews.

Oh, and the new edition of Motor Racing's Strangest Races with an updated cover.  Fortunately it came with the receipt so as I haven't opened it hopefully I'll be able to exchange it for something or other.
 

Plus a little bit of cash which I expect will end up going to Veloce for one or hopefully more of their 80% off offerings.



#8885 Henri Greuter

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Posted 28 December 2018 - 08:36

I have bought:
LANCIA SPORT GR.6 (LC/1) by Vittorio ROBERTI & Alessandro CORDASCO. Book is dual language Italian/English

Roberti has also co written a book on the Delta S4 and this LC/1 book is written in the same style, a very detailed analysis of how the car was built and evolved.

When you are a fan of Lancia, definitely one of the books to think about given the status of the LC/1 within the history of Lancia and how the car came about. If Endurance racers in general is your thing, no matter the brand of car, then this is also a serious option for your book shrank for the same reasons and the status of the car within Endurance racing history. A car that is not listed in the results for constructors that year but waws a race winner for the drivers title three times and the only car that managed to beat the already allmighty 956 in its debut season (1982).

#8886 GMiranda

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Posted 28 December 2018 - 15:17

Hello

 

I recieved The Brothers Rodriguez, by Carlos Jalife, and Inside the Archives, by Jesse Alexander. Both books are amazing in their own ways. Inside the Archives is a superb photo book with numerous photos in colour from the 50's and 60's, with little text. About The Brothers Rodriguez, I have no words for it, it's probably one of the best books I have ever seen, superb research and photos, such an enormous amount of data.... no words really. It will take some time to fully appreciate all those inedit pictures and read it all, because it's a touching book.



#8887 retriever

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 17:56

Referring back to books received at Christmas, I received a copy of the book 'The Uknown Kimi'. It impressed me so much that since 26th December it has been residing in the local village book exchange located in an old telephone box at the bottom of my road!

 

Why on earth do publishers continue to churn out this fodder!


Edited by retriever, 03 January 2019 - 19:15.


#8888 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 18:38

What books did we receive for Christmas this year?
I received none, but I did receive the gift of finding out that Nathan Beehl has a new book coming out in a couple of months about the Ferrari 550/575 series.

Here is some additional information:

The title is "The Ferrari 550 and 575/Road and Race Legends"

The expected release date is around the end of January

The book will be available in two distinct editions. The standard edition will have a choice of dust covers featuring either the 550 or the 575.

The limited edition of 200 will be in leather without a dust jacket. It will contain information that is not included in the standard edition.

From the pictures and details I've seen posted on Ferrarichat.com....and given the author's reputation....they should be beautiful and informative books as a reference as well as for reading enjoyment.

#8889 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 06:18

Out of curiosity, I bought this book and was very surprised how interesting it actually was. While scarcely much of a fan of the current F1 era (which I date back to around the FIASCO War period), it was actually enlightening for once, providing far more about the politics and so forth that takes place behind the scenes than is usually given any real coverage -- than again, may I just wasn't paying much in the way of attention, of course. Far better than the usual tripe on F1 that seems to be the standard fare.

Don, I enjoyed your review of Shutter & Speed on www.speedreaders.info

Jack.

#8890 terry mcgrath

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 14:00

"XK120 in Competition" now available in the UK USA and Australia & NZ 
superb book containing the most amazing collection of photos
 
 
The Foreword is written by Mrs Pat Quinn, the eldest daughter of Sir William and Lady Greta Lyons. As Pat Appleyard, she and Ian Appleyard took the immortal NUB 120 to many rally successes in the early 1950s, including winning the first Alpine Gold Cup ever awarded for three successive penalty-free runs in the International Alpine Rally.

The XK 120 in Competition is written by historic XK owner and researcher Dr James Fraser and edited by Paul Skilleter, with input from David Bentley, Terry McGrath and other leading XK historians. The XK 120 in Competition is in the same large, high-quality format as our acclaimed XK ‘Explored’ series. It extends to approx. 500 pages, lavishly illustrated with some 1,200 photographs. These come from not only the private collections of James Fraser and Paul Skilleter but also from leading photo-libraries worldwide. The majority of these images have never been published before.
 
 
Many hundreds of XK 120s which have competed are identified by registration number, chassis number (where known), and by driver. Indeed it is suspected that some owners will not have known until this book is published that their XK 120 had a competition history! A number of famous or particularly interesting XK 120s are individually profiled, again using many photographs which have seldom, or never, been published before.

Only 550 Standard Editions will be available for sale at GBP220.00 each plus shipping.

Or, for those who require an even more special book, we are offering a gold-blocked, leather bound Limited Edition in a slip-case carrying a chrome/enamel badge depicting a racing XK 120. Only 120 copies of this edition will be sold. As mentioned above, this book will be signed by Mrs Pat Quinn (formerly Mrs Pat Appleyard), Bob Berry, author Dr James Fraser and publisher/contributor Paul Skilleter. The cost of this edition is GBP395.00, including FREE SHIPPING worldwide.

 

https://www.paulskil...4ucjkgaepj9mps4



#8891 Charlieman

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 15:05

Not worth a thread on its own...

 

I'm reading the Ross Brawn/Adam Parr book, _Total Competition: Lessons in Stategy from Formula One_. The structure of the book is annoying me; I understand why Adam Parr makes his philosophical interjections into the talk with Ross Brawn, and sometimes I find them pertinent. I can look at my own work environments and find something useful in Adam Parr's commentary.

 

But I think I'm comprehending less of the historical and philosophical content than if the book had been written in a more straightforward way. I've started so I'll finish.



#8892 D-Type

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 12:38

An annoying trend seems to be creeping in. 

I recently acquired (I won't say "bought" as it came from a charity shop) a copy of Mercedes Sport by Schlegelmilch and Lehbrink..  A fabulous collection of photos, as one would expect of Schlegelmilch, and tr-lingual captions, understandable with a book of photographs.  But ... and it's a big "but" ... the text is 3-or 4- point which I find very hard to read.  I have to accept they are captions, albeit long ones and it was done to incorporate the triple text.  But, this Christmas I was given Stephen South: The way it was by Darren Banks.  An interesting story, but spoilt because again the text is microscopic to the extent that a resorted to trying to use a magnifying glass.  OK - it saves paper or allows more text to be included, but this one has gone a step too far. 

I don't think it is an 'age thing,' I think younger eyes would also find it a strain.
Mercifully, Gary C's Shutter & Speed doesn't make the same mistake.



#8893 stankoprowski

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 19:49

An annoying trend seems to be creeping in. 

I recently acquired (I won't say "bought" as it came from a charity shop) a copy of Mercedes Sport by Schlegelmilch and Lehbrink..  A fabulous collection of photos, as one would expect of Schlegelmilch, and tr-lingual captions, understandable with a book of photographs.  But ... and it's a big "but" ... the text is 3-or 4- point which I find very hard to read.  I have to accept they are captions, albeit long ones and it was done to incorporate the triple text.  But, this Christmas I was given Stephen South: The way it was by Darren Banks.  An interesting story, but spoilt because again the text is microscopic to the extent that a resorted to trying to use a magnifying glass.  OK - it saves paper or allows more text to be included, but this one has gone a step too far. 

I don't think it is an 'age thing,' I think younger eyes would also find it a strain.
Mercifully, Gary C's Shutter & Speed doesn't make the same mistake.

 

 

I know what you mean. I've been diagnosed with AMD and reading any kind of printed matter is a becoming a chore. Even context menus on my PC are difficult. I've resigned myself, for the most part, to Kindle and other ereaders. I was happy to see that John Barnard's biography was available from Kindle. I hope that trend continues. We can only that in the future publishers give some thought to an aging market and consider accessibility.. In the mean time I look at my 1,200 book library and remember how good it was.



#8894 karlcars

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 14:01

In response to the question raised by chrisj, about stories of the great Alfa days and their cars and drivers, I'd like to suggest Racing Colours - Italian Red by yours truly. It tells the whole story of Italian racing the cars, tracks and people. In the same series are German Silver, British Green and French Blue.



#8895 karlcars

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 14:02

Trio of Awards for Reid Railton—Man of Speed

 

Smiling slightly somewhere as he tamped down the tobacco in his favourite pipe, the English engineer took quiet satisfaction in revived recognition of the scope and depth of his career. Reid Antony Railton (1895-1977) reflected on his designs of the first cars to reach 250, 300, 350 and 400 miles per hour—the last as long ago as 1947. When Britain held the Triple Crown of Speed after World War 2, Railton was responsible for both the car and the boat.

             Renewed recognition of Railton’s life of record-breaking and innovation followed the publication in April 2018 by Evro Publishing of a two-volume biography titled Reid Railton — Man of Speed. Written by Karl Ludvigsen and designed by Simon Loxley, the 842-page book proved to be an award-winner in the Railton tradition.

            Reid Railton won the 2018 Michael Sedgwick Award of the Society of Automotive Historians in Britain. Named for a highly respected historian, the award “is presented to the author demonstrating excellence in respect of research, writing quality and furthering the understanding of the subject.”

            Also acclaiming Man of Speed was the Guild of Motoring Writers, whose Montagu Trophy has been awarded to the best book of the year since 1972. Now sponsored by Mercedes-Benz, the respected Trophy was awarded to Karl Ludvigsen for his Railton biography. Ludvigsen is no stranger to the Trophy, for he was its first winner and this his fourth receipt of the Guild award.

            Third to recognise Reid Railton—Man of Speed  was the Royal Automobile Club. In the RAC’s annual awards programme it was judged Specialist Book of the Year by an independent panel. One of the judges said, “What a life story and what a book—lavishly researched, profusely illustrated, endlessly informative.” Said another, “We thought it a superb piece of dedicated research.”

            Added the RAC, “This magisterial book, by one of the world's foremost automotive historians, tells Reid Railton's personal and professional story in fascinating depth with special focus on Reid's unique insights—amounting to genius—and technical accomplishments.”

            Railton would be happy with that.



#8896 Steve L

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 16:22

Great stuff Karl!

Now can you write a companion tome on the equally interesting George Eyston please?!

Designer/driver and developer of some great cars. MGs, Panhard, Thunderbolt, Speed of the Wind... And respected team manager too!

#8897 john aston

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 08:41

Re the Gordon Murray book , which has been mentioned in another thread I have now registered my interest with Porter Press - the word is that the book keeps growing and is unlikely to be launched at Goodwood Members' Meeting. Which at least means that an already pricey weekend won't now actually bankrupt me . :clap:



#8898 Ralf Pickel

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 12:25

Thank you for that info.

Will also save me some money.

And luggage space..



#8899 D-Type

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 13:00

Does anyone know if there is a list anywhere of the books that won the awards Karl mentioned above: The Montagu Trophy presented by the Guild of Motoring Writers and the Michael Sedgwick Award of the Society of Automotive Historians in Britain?  I've briefly googled but mot found any simple lists.



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#8900 Vitesse2

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 13:11

Sedgwick Award winners:

 

2017 - Wolseley, a Very British Car by Anders Ditlev Clausager – a comprehensive marque history.
2016 – Skinner’s Union: A History of the Skinner Family and the S.U. Company by Mike Harvey – the full story of the well-known carburettor company.
2015 – Harry Lester, his cars and the Monkey Stable by Stewart Penfound – a history of the activities of this garagiste and his competition cars
2014 - Morris, the Cars and the Company by Jon Pressnell – a new history of Britain’s foremost industrialist and philanthropist’s motoring activities.
2013 – Carscapes: The Motor Car, Architecture and Landscape in England by John Minnis and Kathryn Morrison – a well-illustrated survey of this subject which has hitherto received little attention.
2012 – Coachcraft by John Dyson – a full history of this coachbuilder, well known in the 1930s for bodying a major part of Railton’s output.

 

Source: https://michaelsedgw...ick-award-2018/