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The Pete Fenelon and Michael Catsch (Tuboscocca) Memorial Book Thread


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#8901 Tim Murray

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 13:18

The winners and other top contenders in the Montagu Trophy since 2000 are here:

https://www.gomw.co.uk/awards/montagu

although the Montagu Trophy award has been running for a lot longer than that.

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#8902 Vitesse2

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 13:18

According to the Guild's website, the list of all Montagu Award winners can be found in their Who's Who in the Motor Industry yearbook.

 

All the Guild's 2016, 2017 and 2018 winners are linked here: https://www.gomw.co.uk/awards There are also links to the 2012 and 2013 awards in the sidebar, but presumably nobody remembered to update the page to include 2014 and 2015 when they were dropped off the main text!



#8903 SamoanAttorney

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:21

According to the Guild's website, the list of all Montagu Award winners can be found in their Who's Who in the Motor Industry yearbook.

 

All the Guild's 2016, 2017 and 2018 winners are linked here: https://www.gomw.co.uk/awards There are also links to the 2012 and 2013 awards in the sidebar, but presumably nobody remembered to update the page to include 2014 and 2015 when they were dropped off the main text!

 

 

Thank you for pointing out this omission, I will let the relevant person know and get the problem fixed.



#8904 SamoanAttorney

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 13:01

All done!



#8905 D-Type

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 22:48

It looks as if the Montagu Award is given to an individual and is not necessarily related to a particular book.  Is that correct?



#8906 SamoanAttorney

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Posted 29 January 2019 - 07:19

It looks as if the Montagu Award is given to an individual and is not necessarily related to a particular book.  Is that correct?

 

A very good point...........I will get clarification and report back.



#8907 karlcars

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 10:26

As this year's recipient I can say that it's awarded to a particular book -- and its author!

 

I'm proud to be the first recipient. I said at the time that the award's merit would only be decided by the winning books that followed. I think it has been a good index of merit since.



#8908 karlcars

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 10:33

Just caught up with the post by Steve L suggesting a book about George Eyston. I agree that this could be very interesting indeed. 

 

He of course figures in various parts of the Railton saga, including the Goldie Gardner chapter. In fact I provide an appendix describing the design and creation of his Thunderbolt. He also has a role in The Supercharging Story which I hope to wrap up later this year.

 

Any more votes for Eyston?



#8909 Vitesse2

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Posted 09 February 2019 - 11:53

Just caught up with the post by Steve L suggesting a book about George Eyston. I agree that this could be very interesting indeed. 

 

He of course figures in various parts of the Railton saga, including the Goldie Gardner chapter. In fact I provide an appendix describing the design and creation of his Thunderbolt. He also has a role in The Supercharging Story which I hope to wrap up later this year.

 

Any more votes for Eyston?

Absolutely!

 

I believe he holds the distinction of being the only LSR holder to attempt to qualify as an Olympic yachtsman ... and I'm also pretty sure there's much to be discovered about his various flirtations with powerboating. :)



#8910 Steve L

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 14:13

Just caught up with the post by Steve L suggesting a book about George Eyston. I agree that this could be very interesting indeed. 

 

He of course figures in various parts of the Railton saga, including the Goldie Gardner chapter. In fact I provide an appendix describing the design and creation of his Thunderbolt. He also has a role in The Supercharging Story which I hope to wrap up later this year.

 

Any more votes for Eyston?

 

Hi Karl.

 

I thought my suggestion was a cheeky one in a way, but then again I also thought it to be a very good and interesting one too!

 

GET seems to have lived a hugely full and varied life and I would love to learn and see more about him and his projects.  As well as the things I mentioned before, I'd like to know about his early life including service record, his involvement through the 1920's with Aston Martin (both on track and on the water), racing with Bugatti cars, his professional and personal relationship with Ernest Eldridge (another fascinating character in his own right for both the right and wrong reasons! - aero engined Brooklands monsters, specials raced at the Indy 500, Miller record attempts, bigamy...), all of the super record breaking cars (MG's, Black Magic, Speed of the Wind, Thunderbolt...).

 

I think you would have a ready market for such a book including everyone interested in the marques with which George Eyston was associated, as well as the record breaking enthusiasts.


Edited by Steve L, 10 February 2019 - 14:14.


#8911 ensign14

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Posted 10 February 2019 - 16:29

I would vote for an Eyston book too, he's something of an overlooked figure.  Land Speed Record holder in an era in which the world's fastest cars were built in the Black Country.  And a Military Cross holder.

 

I'd also vote for a Nigel Beresford book.  :wave:



#8912 D-Type

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 00:27

As this year's recipient I can say that it's awarded to a particular book -- and its author!

 

I'm proud to be the first recipient. I said at the time that the award's merit would only be decided by the winning books that followed. I think it has been a good index of merit since.

But the Guild of Motoring Writers lists the author and not the book.  As a potential book buyer I was hoping the Guild could advise me which books to buy.  But sadly it appears not to be so.


Edited by D-Type, 15 February 2019 - 00:34.


#8913 SamoanAttorney

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Posted 16 February 2019 - 07:11

But the Guild of Motoring Writers lists the author and not the book.  As a potential book buyer I was hoping the Guild could advise me which books to buy.  But sadly it appears not to be so.

 

 

D-Type - your point is a very valid one, the books that the awards are based on should also be listed as well as their authors.

 

I have alerted the relevant persons responsible for putting this information on the Guild website, I am told it is in hand. I will chase.......

 

jb



#8914 D-Type

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 20:10

D-Type - your point is a very valid one, the books that the awards are based on should also be listed as well as their authors.

 

I have alerted the relevant persons responsible for putting this information on the Guild website, I am told it is in hand. I will chase.......

 

jb

Thanks,  I asked the question because I felt award-winning books are worthy of serious consideration.



#8915 Vitesse2

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Posted 22 February 2019 - 15:59

Wearing my charity selling hat again, I wondered if someone here might be interested in a signed first edition of Sir Geoffrey de Havilland's autobiography Sky Fever? It even has some motoring and motor sport interest! Not only signed, but with a dedication to his colleague Francis E St Barbe, who was the de Havilland company's sales manager for many years. Up for auction on eBay, starting at a mere £20 - item number 254135751544 - and Gift Aided, so whatever you pay for it HMRC will give us another 20% of the purchase price at no cost to you!

 

SOLD! :clap:



#8916 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 15:15

Wearing my charity selling hat again, I wondered if someone here might be interested in a signed first edition of Sir Geoffrey de Havilland's autobiography Sky Fever? It even has some motoring and motor sport interest! Not only signed, but with a dedication to his colleague Francis E St Barbe, who was the de Havilland company's sales manager for many years. Up for auction on eBay, starting at a mere £20 - item number 254135751544 - and Gift Aided, so whatever you pay for it HMRC will give us another 20% of the purchase price at no cost to you!


When we go to Goodwood we stay at a farm in the village of Sutton. The owner is a retired BA 747 captain and keeps his Tiger Moth on the property. This would be a wonderful gift for him. I will bid and hope to win.

#8917 cooper997

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 08:04

Tuesday week ago, one of the authors of the following book made mention to me that "The books are here!" Clearly satisfied, however not quite like a proud new parent would announce a new family arrival. None-the-less, as many authors here will attest the hard graft of a  book is done for year's before it sees the light of day and the pleasure is seeing the completed work out in the big wide world for fellow enthusiasts to enjoy.

 

Here is the culmination of two well known Australian motoring enthusiasts, Phillip Schudmak and Tony Johns with an interest in WO Bentley's and high profile positions within the Bentley Drivers Club of Australia to bring vintage Bentley authority, Clare Hay and Bob Watson (yes, the Australian Rally champion) into the project. The four collectively covering the Australian WO Bentley scene that began in 1922, just 3 years after W O set up his works. Indeed, suitably timed in this centenary of the marque. Although not  intentional, just the timeline that ultimately befell getting the project together.

 

A mix of over 1000 period and modern photographs, sharing space with period advertising, throughout 416 pages to tell the life of Bentley in Australia. Including histories of the cars that have arrived on these shores since 1922 and also those that have since moved around the globe. Also the cars that have enjoyed some spirited driving in the odd bit of competition in years past or across Australia and other global adventures in more recent times..

 

Given the BDCA are the proud publishers, it's fitting Bob Watson tells the club story since formation in 1956

 

More details via http://www.vintagebe...y.org/home.html

 

or direct from Tony Johns via email

treasurer at vintagebentley.org

 

BDCA%20website%20update%205.jpg

 

Stephen



#8918 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 16:57

Wearing my charity selling hat again, I wondered if someone here might be interested in a signed first edition of Sir Geoffrey de Havilland's autobiography Sky Fever? It even has some motoring and motor sport interest! Not only signed, but with a dedication to his colleague Francis E St Barbe, who was the de Havilland company's sales manager for many years. Up for auction on eBay, starting at a mere £20 - item number 254135751544 - and Gift Aided, so whatever you pay for it HMRC will give us another 20% of the purchase price at no cost to you!
 
SOLD! :clap:

But not to me, dammit......:mad:

#8919 Allan Lupton

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 18:21

Sorry about that, Jack, but 'twas I who got it.

As a former de Havilland apprentice/employee I can't think why I didn't have "Sky Fever" already - I could have bought it "in period" but didn't and once the moment had passed. . .



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#8920 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 18:57

Sorry about that, Jack, but 'twas I who got it.
As a former de Havilland apprentice/employee I can't think why I didn't have "Sky Fever" already - I could have bought it "in period" but didn't and once the moment had passed. . .

Congratulations! I got busy and distracted with other matters and the auction slipped past me. To be honest I probably wouldn't have bid up to your price in any case. I'm glad it's in the "family!" :wave:

#8921 john aston

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 07:23

I have just finished David Tremayne's Jim Clark - Best of the Best .  Given how much I enjoyed the same author's The Lost Generation my hopes were high - and were met in full.The curious , almost unsettling thing for me was that I hadn't realised just what a presence Clark had been in my own motor sport life (which only began in 1967,. the year before Hockenheim)until reading this terrific book . I am doubly glad now I made the effort to attend the 50th anniversary at Duns last year.

 

My review is now on speedreaders.info   



#8922 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 13:32

I have just finished David Tremayne's Jim Clark - Best of the Best .  Given how much I enjoyed the same author's The Lost Generation my hopes were high - and were met in full.The curious , almost unsettling thing for me was that I hadn't realised just what a presence Clark had been in my own motor sport life (which only began in 1967,. the year before Hockenheim)until reading this terrific book . I am doubly glad now I made the effort to attend the 50th anniversary at Duns last year.
 
My review is now on speedreaders.info


I read the review last night. Although I won't be purchasing the book, the review is excellent.

#8923 PRD

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 16:06

I have just finished David Tremayne's Jim Clark - Best of the Best .  Given how much I enjoyed the same author's The Lost Generation my hopes were high - and were met in full.The curious , almost unsettling thing for me was that I hadn't realised just what a presence Clark had been in my own motor sport life (which only began in 1967,. the year before Hockenheim)until reading this terrific book . I am doubly glad now I made the effort to attend the 50th anniversary at Duns last year.

 

My review is now on speedreaders.info   

 

Excellent review John. I, too, remember watching that Italian Grand Prix on that sunny September afternoon and exactly where I was when Dad told me the awful news. 



#8924 Vitesse2

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 21:02

Again donning my 'charity hat', can I draw TNFers' attention to a nice little donation of Volvo books we received today? A couple of Volvo Amazon/P1800 manuals - from Brooklands Books and Intereurope - plus Anders Detlev Clausager's 1995 book on the same models (which has some sporting content) and Bill Webb's self-published and now incredibly-hard-to-find-at-any-sensible-price Swedish Iron. Links to all of them here. Do feel free to browse and buy from any of the other 1300+ items!

 

[ETA - the Brooklands manual has sold!]



#8925 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 03:48

Does anybody know what's going on with David Bull Publishing?



I've been told that they are the publishers of the late Michael Lynch and Luigi Chinetti, Jr., forthcoming book on Chinetti/NART. Can anyone confirm?

When I attempt to access the web site I get a message that it is a "private site", password required.

EDIT: A message on the FB page says they are currently unable to fill any orders. That sounds rather ominous.

Edited by Jack-the-Lad, 19 March 2019 - 04:50.


#8926 Tim Murray

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Posted 22 March 2019 - 04:27

Has anyone read the biography of Betty Haig by Roger Farmer? It was published last September, but had only a limited print run of 350, so most retail outlets now seem to be out of stock. Review here:

http://retro-speed.c...s.asp?art=26543

#8927 Jeff Weinbren

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 03:31

Jack,

Came across this re David Bull Publishing:-

 

https://www.publishe...seek-buyer.html



#8928 Jack-the-Lad

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 13:22

Jack,
Came across this re David Bull Publishing:-
 
https://www.publishe...seek-buyer.html


Thanks, Jeff. That was back in 2015, so there were signs of difficulties even back then. Just for everybody's information I haven't been able to find out any new information. I think the business is probably just failing because of David Bull's physical situation and the financial challenges faced by all small, niche publishing houses.

#8929 Jon Saltinstall

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Posted 25 March 2019 - 20:23

Two more recommended foreign-language books, a bit specialised in nature but then so many excellent books fall into that bracket - “McNamara Racing; Der Weg Von Lenggries Nach Indianapolis” by Peter Schroeder (VIEW, 2015), and "Formel Vau Und Super Vau" by Thomas Kessler, Frank Orthey & Lothar Panten (VIEW, 2017). Labours of love, both, and some fantastically-detailed research.


Edited by Jon Saltinstall, 25 March 2019 - 20:24.


#8930 West3

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 23:14

I just received my copies of Twice Around the Clock: The Yanks at Le Mans by Tim Considine. A three volume set covering the period of 1923 through 1979, as the title would lead one to think, the books are specific to US participation at La Sarthe. The author has worked on this project for the last 26 years, interviewing drivers, mechanics, team owners and other participants. Winners, losers and backmarkers alike, over 300 of their stories are told with Considine providing historical background and context, stats and plenty of pictures. Obviously many are no longer able to relate their experiences. I find the author's writing style to be very engaging and readable, not to mention highly informative. Production quality is high too. Additional volumes covering subsequent decades are planned. While undoubtedly a niche subject, and fairly spendy, I think these are worth considering for those with an interest in the historical record as well as the human side of the sport.



#8931 PRD

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 16:02

Upcoming shortly

 

 https://porterpress....ray-one-formula

 

Deep pockets required as first edition is £225.

 

There's a limited edition for £750       https://porterpress....ook-one-formula

 

and a unique edition for £2500           https://porterpress....k-gordon-murray



#8932 Charlieman

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 17:30

Upcoming shortly

 

 https://porterpress....ray-one-formula

 

Deep pockets required as first edition is £225.

 

Contrast with the Adrian Newey book: Sold by an international publisher in supermarkets for the price of a bag of groceries; Read by thousands and with a very good rating by those reporting on review sites.

 

Or the John Barnard book.

 

The Gordon Murray book: Too expensive to be a gift; Read by few; Unlikely to be cited -- because few people own a copy.



#8933 Regazzoni

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 17:57

Disappointed. Does he needs the money? If he has a legacy or teachings to leave to a younger generation of car designers, or relate a part of racing car history, this 225 pounds' project of a book say he doesn't really care. That looks like the McLaren road car of books - for the few who just want to show off their bookshelf. Newey's book will come out in paperback next year, instead.



#8934 Charlieman

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 20:22

Disappointed. Does he needs the money? If he has a legacy or teachings to leave to a younger generation of car designers, or relate a part of racing car history, this 225 pounds' project of a book say he doesn't really care. That looks like the McLaren road car of books - for the few who just want to show off their bookshelf. Newey's book will come out in paperback next year, instead.

I suspect that Gordon Murray didn't think enough -- and I don't like saying that because I admire the bloke.

 

On my book shelves I own the continuing BRM tale -- three volumes so far, and we'll get the last tome when the job is done. 



#8935 Regazzoni

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 20:54

I love Tony Rudd's autobio, but that is about it. I don't really care about BRM, the only bit would be the Seventies' cars, more of a curiosity and perhaps because of Southgate, Siffert, Rodriguez and Beltoise, but if I buy one then I want the whole set and at that price, really, respectfully, you can keep BRM for yourselves.

 

On the other hand, I do have Simon Moore's whole opus, bought directly from himself, but that is about some serious Alfa Romeos...

 

Mind, I could, and probably will, get Murray's book because... too long to explain.

 

But he is not in Chapman's or Forghieri's league, as far as I am concerned, nowhere near, and I say that as long-term fan of his,



#8936 jtremlett

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 20:56

Disappointed. Does he needs the money? If he has a legacy or teachings to leave to a younger generation of car designers, or relate a part of racing car history, this 225 pounds' project of a book say he doesn't really care. That looks like the McLaren road car of books - for the few who just want to show off their bookshelf. Newey's book will come out in paperback next year, instead.

I think that's probably a little unfair.  Murray (and his publisher) have chosen a different route to Newey and Barnard.  Both of those are basically text with a handful of photos.  The Murray book is clearly (from what is shown in the link Charlieman has posted), a different way of going about things through a larger format, picture-heavy route.  So purely on that basis the price goes up, then when the price goes up the sales volumes are likely to go down so the publisher has to try to find a price at which they can still make a profit (and for a small publisher, I imagine they can't afford to risk too much either).  I very much doubt it is about Murray needing the money and I doubt he will make much from it.   



#8937 Regazzoni

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 21:03

I get all that, it's all a fair argument. But it's still 225 pounds. And it's not about the P3.

 

You want to do an expensive motorsport book? 100 pounds tops. Above it's a collector's business, not motorsport passion. My modest view, eh?



#8938 PRD

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 22:08

Thinking about two volume books in slip cases, a good few years ago I was persuaded by TNF to buy Time and Two Seats, which at £140 seemed a heck of a lot of money at the time, but a bargain today. The Murray book may turn out the same, who knows. It's all about following one's passion, I'm not interested enough in Alfas to buy any of Simon Moore's books, but I might go for a Murray even at £225

 

Speaking of Janos Wimpffen, has anyone had any news of a T&TS update as was once mooted? 



#8939 Charlieman

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 22:10

I think that's probably a little unfair.  Murray (and his publisher) have chosen a different route to Newey and Barnard.  Both of those are basically text with a handful of photos. 

 

The Murray book is clearly (from what is shown in the link Charlieman has posted), a different way of going about things through a larger format, picture-heavy route. 

 

So purely on that basis the price goes up, then when the price goes up the sales volumes are likely to go down so the publisher has to try to find a price at which they can still make a profit (and for a small publisher, I imagine they can't afford to risk too much either).  I very much doubt it is about Murray needing the money and I doubt he will make much from it.   

I, Charlieman, do not have any inside knowledge of Gordon Murray's book and the publishers etc.

 

I too doubt that Gordon Murray needs the dosh.

 

But the £225 Gordon Murray story is a daft price -- even in two volumes.



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#8940 Vitesse2

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 22:39

£225 may seem a lot, but when you consider that the book has over 1200 illustrations - many of which will have come from commercial archives - you're looking at paying a substantial amount for picture rights: I just had a play around with Getty's pricing tool and just for UK and US rights for use in a book they quote about £100 per image! No doubt it's possible to get bulk rates if you're buying a lot, but that's still a big wedge to recoup. Other images like technical drawings and blueprints will have had to be professionally scanned - nobody does that for free either.

 

Remind me again how Oscar Wilde described a cynic?  ;)



#8941 Regazzoni

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 22:44

Among all these niches - BRM, Murray's Brabhams - what is still missing is a book about the ground effect Lotuses, how they came about etc considering they changed the sport upside down ever since. Ludvigsen published a couple of pages of Chapman's memo of August 1975, which set out the principles, and I understand it ran at more than 20-25 pages. Clive Chapman perhaps could have interest to encourage the development of such a book.
It would be worth the price of a serious Alfa Romeo or Ferrari tome, that is the league. But I also think that a piece of serious history - motorsport technology, in this case - does not need glossy paper and pictures, with attendant inflated price, but an honest 30 pounds hardback would do, with paperback a couple of years later. If the real interest is the subject itself and the production of a serious piece of scholarly.



#8942 Regazzoni

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 23:18

£225 may seem a lot, but when you consider that the book has over 1200 illustrations - many of which will have come from commercial archives - you're looking at paying a substantial amount for picture rights: I just had a play around with Getty's pricing tool and just for UK and US rights for use in a book they quote about £100 per image! No doubt it's possible to get bulk rates if you're buying a lot, but that's still a big wedge to recoup. Other images like technical drawings and blueprints will have had to be professionally scanned - nobody does that for free either.

 

Remind me again how Oscar Wilde described a cynic?  ;)

 

At that price I would expect to see included a lot, and I mean a lot, of design drawings of the cars, with his insights as the designer. And technical details' photos. Everything else has already been published on the magazines - Autosport, Autosprint, Rombo, Grand Prix International etc. They will have to justify 225 pounds. Otherwise the BT52 Haynes' book I found at The Works in Manchester for 6 pounds will do...



#8943 PCC

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 00:41

I very much doubt it is about Murray needing the money and I doubt he will make much from it.   

I suspect you're right. For a start, he's neither the author nor the publisher, so it's not automatic that he will make anything at all. Nor does he set the price.



#8944 john aston

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 05:46

Well, compared to some of the  stuff I see in Octane this looks almost affordable. It is a lot , but the book promises to be special , I am a big admirer of GM and man maths therefore means I shall buy it with a clean conscience   :stoned:



#8945 ensign14

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 08:52

Contrast with the Adrian Newey book: Sold by an international publisher in supermarkets for the price of a bag of groceries; Read by thousands and with a very good rating by those reporting on review sites.

 

It was also available on remainder within weeks.  And people have heard of Newey.  Gordon Murray is something of a niche interest.
 



#8946 john aston

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 09:44

But ..so what ? Nobody has now heard of Phil Hill, but his book (wonderful though it undoubtedly is ) was not exactly in the Poundland category ...The people who have heard of Newey but not Murray are likely to be those....umm... 'fans' ... who think they are motorsport enthusiasts because they watch F1 on TV and once got a free ticket to  a BTCC meeting .



#8947 kayemod

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 11:46

I suspect you're right. For a start, he's neither the author nor the publisher, so it's not automatic that he will make anything at all. Nor does he set the price.

 

 

In the book's prologue, John Barnard is quoted in The Perfect Car as having refused several previous biography requests from too greedy publishers. It's surely logical to assume therefore, that he's benefiting financially from the Nick Skeens effort, and so he rightfully should. He clearly worked long and diligently collaborating very fully with the man who for want of a more dignifying term I'll call "the Ghostwriter". It's an excellent work that I greatly enjoyed, so recommended without reservation.

 

And at a very sensible price...



#8948 Vitesse2

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 12:05

"Now Barabbas Was a Publisher ..."



#8949 PCC

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 13:09

In the book's prologue, John Barnard is quoted in The Perfect Car as having refused several previous biography requests from too greedy publishers. It's surely logical to assume therefore, that he's benefiting financially from the Nick Skeens effort, and so he rightfully should. He clearly worked long and diligently collaborating very fully with the man who for want of a more dignifying term I'll call "the Ghostwriter". It's an excellent work that I greatly enjoyed, so recommended without reservation.

 

And at a very sensible price...

According to the listing on Amazon, Skeens is not the ghostwriter - he's the writer. It's a biography, not an autobiography. Publishers sign contacts with books' authors, not their subjects. If the publisher and author want to secure a subject's cooperation, then remuneration may be required, but as I said, it's not a given.

 

I just point this out because whenever a really expensive niche book like this comes out, there's outrage over the alleged greed of those who produced it. But in this case, if Murray is making any money at all, he's sharing it with a writer and a publisher, and none of them is making a dime until the undoubtedly very high production costs are covered. As I expect Doug Nye could confirm, this kind of project is not a ticket to early retirement for anyone.



#8950 Regazzoni

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Posted 14 April 2019 - 18:31

I just point this out because whenever a really expensive niche book like this comes out, there's outrage over the alleged greed of those who produced it. But in this case, if Murray is making any money at all, he's sharing it with a writer and a publisher, and none of them is making a dime until the undoubtedly very high production costs are covered. As I expect Doug Nye could confirm, this kind of project is not a ticket to early retirement for anyone.

 

Just to clarify that as a “strong” buyer of “niche” books, I wasn’t crying outrage, but I hope I am entitled to say what I think.

The Newey’s and Barnard’s books are clear examples of books that try reaching out to a large part of the community, building true motorsport culture, particularly in times where the cacophony of unqualified opinions around the sport is deafening. Another case is Dal Monte’s Ferrari biography, well-researched and nicely priced both in the original and in translation.

Those 225 pounds to me look directed to those who can afford to buy his cars, rather than someone keen to study his ideas - if he has any, that is – or recollections.

Over and out.