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Speed's ultimate price: the toll...


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#1201 maxie

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 17:45

1933.9.10:

Count Czaikowski (or Czaykowski) was killed on the same day as Campari and Borzacchini. Campari and Borzacchini were killed in the second heat, while Czaikowski was killed in the final.

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#1202 maxie

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 18:01

1925:

Paul Torchy was killed in the Spanish GP.

#1203 kstrt

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 10:30

Can I see a list of the drivers who died racing?

#1204 Ray Bell

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 10:55

I guess you'd have to say that it's not yet complete...

And even on this forum, there are those not mentioned in this thread who are recorded in others.

#1205 kstrt

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 11:00

Yes, it isn?t complete. I would like to know the drivers who had died racing in F3 at the sixties

#1206 Mischa Bijenhof

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 11:56

Wim Gerlach was killed during a sportscarrace at Zandvoort on june 9, 1957 when his Porsche speedster left the track and flipped over in the sand, while lying in second position. Gerlach was killed instantly. The corner in which the accident occured was named after him and carries his name ever since.

#1207 Muzza

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 17:11

Fellows,

The most recent update of Motorsport Memorial was published yesterday (Sunday, December 21st). The site experienced some interesting developments in the last days:

1.) We welcome the arrival of Andrew "Macca" McPhee to the team! Macca will be responsible for the PHP/MySQL programming - and the implementation of these techniques will take Motorsport Memorial to a whole new level. For example, updates will be published daily (instead of weekly), and a series of new pages and features will be soon created.
Many thanks to Macca for volunteering his time and for offering much-needed help in this area.

Also, pyrytus is doing a fantastic job backing the entries from his tables with sources. At the same time he is checking each one of them. The quality of his work is really impressive - we were not only able to find out some sadly forgotten fatalitities, but also of learning a lot of details about a few well known ones. Pyrytus is actually leading the research, while I am focusing on entering the data.

2.) The Updates page has been completely revamped. Now we are tracking additions, editions and deletions within the database itself. In consequence, the Updates page is much more infomative - now visitors can see exactly what piece of information was updated on each record.

3.) We had the already announced change on the criteria to display nicknames, short names and altered names.

These are the new entries to the Motorsport Memorial database (please check the website for specific sources and some additional details) :

Additions
Emanuele Cedrino
Italian driver killed on 2 May 1908 in a practice crash at the 1.0-mile dirt oval Pimlico track in Baltimore, MD, United States. Cedrino was 29-year old.

Emile Stricker
Swiss driver killed at the wheel of a Renault during a 24-hour race at the (Birmningham) Fairgrounds Raceway - a 1.0-mile dirt oval - in Alabama, United States, in 1908.

? Schaube
Riding mechanic to Henri Cissac, killed (as well as Cissac) during the Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France held in Dieppe on 07 Jul 1908.

Léon Tutélaire
Riding mechanic killed in practice for the Couple de la Meuse, on 12 Jun 1910 (see details at this posting by Michael "Fines" Ferner).

Thierry Renaud
Philippe Bugalski's co-driver, killed during the 1995 Rally Grasse-Alpin, ran in April of that year. Vehicle was a Renault Clio Maxi. Renaud was a French citizen.

Jutta Gebert
Austrian co-driver to Beppo Harrach, she was killed on 25 May 2002 after a crash that took place that same day during the Bosch-Rallye, valid for Austrian Rally Championship. Harrach and Gebert were sharing a Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6. The driver was charged in court, accused of negligence (that would have caused Gebert's death), but was acquitted earlier this year.
Gebert was born in Vienna on 29 April 1968. We are still looking for a confirmation of place of death (apparently Vienna).

Herbert Lettner
Lettner, an Austrian born on 19 November 1970, perished after an accident during the Forstinger Rally, part of the 2000 Austrian Rally Championship. Lettner was driving a Volkswagen Golf TDI. He crashed on 23 September 2000 and passed away later that same day in Graz.

Marcel van Nuland
The 27-year old Dutch co-driver was killed on 27 April 2002 in a crash in the sixth special stage of the 2002 Breko Rallysprint Hurst, valid for the National Dutch Rally Championship and for the National Dutch Rallysprint Championship. Van Nuland was co-driving for Edwin Hoskam. A sudden rain fell during the race, catching the competitors on slick tires in a very slippery road. Hoskam and van Nuland's Volkswagen Golf GTI left the road at high speed and crashed against a tree. Unfortunately Marcel did not survive the crash. Hoskam was injured.

Dan Shaw
As reported by Barry Lake in this posting.

Editions
Pat Fairfield
brand/model of vehicle: Frazer Nash-BMW

René Kippeurth
type of vehicle: car
subtype of vehicle: sportscar
category: sportscar - non-championship
race: 24 Heures du Mans
event: race
track, circuit or stage: Le Mans
track variant: 1932-1955
date of accident: 19 June 1937
date of death: 19 June 1937
brand/model of vehicle: Bugatti 44
role: driver

"Pierre Levegh"
brand/model of vehicle: Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR

Jo Bonnier
brand/model of vehicle: Lola T280

Jean-Louis Lafosse
brand/model of vehicle: Rondeau M379 C

Albert Clément
age: 24
place of death: St.-Martin-en-Campagne, France

Henri Cissac
subtype of car: sportscar
number of fatalities: 2

M. De Rosa (instead of ? De Rosa)
name: M. De Rosa
full name: M. De Rosa
race: The International Light Car Race of the Automobile Club of America

Janusz Szajng
category: Polish Rally Championhsip

Jerzy Landsberg
category: Polish Rally Championhsip

Patrick Dodin (instead of Patrice Dodin)
name: Patrick Dodin
full name: Patrick Dodin
vehicle: motorcycle
track: 1979 Paris-Dakar, Agadez-Tahoua
country of death: Niger

Attilio Bettega
subtype of vehicle: sportscar

six unknown spectators, 1986 TAP Rally of Portugal
subtype of vehicle: sportscar

Lars-Erik Torph
place of birth: Säffle, Sweden

Sven Behling
date of accident: 04 July 1997

Fabio Danti
date of accident: 03 June 2000
category: Italian Hillclimb Championship

Wilbur Brink
date of accident: 30 May 1930
date of death: 30 May 1930
event: race
age: 11

Irineu Correa
date of accident 02 June 1935
date of death: 02 June 1935
race: Grande Prêmio da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro
death place: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
brand/model of vehicle: Ford V8
role: driver

Alfred Opalko
full name corrected: Alfred Opalko
date of accident: 28 May 1937
date of death: 28 May 1937

Lawson Harris
date of accident: 20 September 1939
date of death: 20 September 1939
event: private test

Rob Slotemaker
subtype of vehicle: touring car
added one injury to accident report

Michel Wyder
subtype of vehicle: sportscar

Henri Toivonen
subtype of vehicle: sportscar
track, circuit or stage: 1986 Tour de Corse, SS17

Sergio Cresto
subtype of vehicle: sportscar
track, circuit or stage: 1986 Tour de Corse, SS17

Bertil Rehnfeldt
nationality: Swedish
place of death: Château St.-Michel-de-Boulogne, France

Rodger Freeth
name corrected: Rodger Freeth
full name corrected: Rodger Freeth
nationality: Newzealander
race: Telecom Rally Australia
track, circuit or stage: 1993 Telecom Rally Australia, SS3
brand/model of vehicle: Subaru Legacy RS
championship: World Rally Championship

Marian Bublewicz
category: Polish Rally Championship
date of birth: 25 August 1950
age: 42

Sven Behling
role: co-driver
category: European Rally Championship
track, circuit or stage: 1997 ADAC-Deutschland-Rallye, SS9

Freddy Charlier
full name: Frédéric-Charles Charlier
age: 39

Harry Martin
year of accident corrected: 1911
year of death corrected: 1911
date of accident completed: 26 June 1911
date of death completed: 26 June 1911

Biagio Nazzaro
date of accident: 15 Jul 1922
date of death: 15 Jul 1922
place of death: near Strasbourg, France
event: race
role: driver
subtype of vehicle: single seater
track, circuit or stage: Strasbourg
circuit variant: 1922-1926

Herschel McKee
date of accident completed: 03 December 1922
date of death completed: 03 December 1922

Ernie Ansterberg
date of accident completed: 16 October 1924
date of death completed: 16 October 1924

Henry Segrave
full name: Sir Henry Segrave
age: 33
name of vehicle: Miss England II
place of death: Lake Windermere, United Kingdom

William Barry
name: William Barry
full name: William C. Barry
date of accident completed: 09 June 1930
date of deatht completed: 09 June 1930

Herman Schurch
date of accident completed: 07 November 1931
date of death completed: 07 November 1931
event: practice
track: Legion Ascot S'way
age: 28
role: driver
place of death: Los Angeles, CA, United States

Bill Caldwell
circuit variant corrected: 1957-1966

Deletions
Enzo Corti
Cause of death was traffic accident

Note that, as suggested by Tjeerd van der Zee, we are classifying the Group B rally cars of 1983-1986 as "sportscars", rather than "touring cars".

Thanks to maxie, Franklin and Mischa Bijenhof for the postings and to Barry Lake for his very nice words on our project – that is yours too, Barry. Special thanks to Tjeerd van der Zee at RallyBase, that gave us a major hand with information about rally fatalities.

Regards,

Muzza

#1208 Mawerick

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 17:50

I noticed that this is not mentioned: http://forums.atlasf...887#post1392887

Or am I just blind? :o

#1209 Muzza

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 18:25

Originally posted by Mawerick
I noticed that this is not mentioned: http://forums.atlasf...887#post1392887

Or am I just blind? :o


Hello, Mawerick (and thanks for your videos - by the way, I am sending you a message about them, I am having problems to watch AVIs)

No you are not blind... Even though we are working very hard to input all fatalities mentioned in this thread into the Motorsport Memorial database, we still have quite a backlog from this and other sources (some 1500 new entries are queued). Our apologies, the information from your posting will be entered as soon as possible.

Please note that we have been entering and/or updating more than one hundred records every week, and all information needs to be checked and verified - what is a time-consuming task.

I hope you understand that we are doing our best to continuously improve Motorsport Memorial - not only by entering data, but also by offering new features and more informative pages. But this is no small project, and it will take a while for this site to reach the point where your - as well as our - expectations are fulfilled.

Thanks for your patience,


Muzza

#1210 Barry Lake

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 01:26

Muzza

I notice you have Rodger Freeth as a "Newzealander".

The country is New Zealand, two words. I have never seen the two words joined like this.

I will leave it up to those who hail from that country to tell you if "New Zealander" is the correct term.

#1211 Muzza

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 04:25

Originally posted by Barry Lake
(...) I will leave it up to those who hail from that country to tell you if "New Zealander" is the correct term.


:blush: Sorry, Barry - you are right, I just checked two dictionaries and the proper spelling is New Zealander, as you stated. It will be corrected immediately.

Thanks for catching that!

By the way, as we are focusing our actions on the period 1890-1939 this week I am working on this posting of yours right now. Man, you threw up in the air some things that we took for certain! I will post a message on this concern within the next days.

Cheers,


Muzza

#1212 Ray Bell

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 06:51

Originally posted by Muzza
.....By the way, as we are focusing our actions on the period 1890-1939 this week I am working on this posting of yours right now. Man, you threw up in the air some things that we took for certain! I will post a message on this concern within the next days.


Hmmm... an interesting URL there....

#1213 Muzza

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 19:43

:blush: :mad: Shame on me, Ray - I posted a link to the wrong URL. What a bonehead... :down:

Barry, my apologies, I meant this posting. By the way, I finished checking it and I will post my comments later today.

#1214 Muzza

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Posted 25 December 2003 - 20:40

Dear Fellows,


I refer to this very informative posting by Barry Lake. I will comment on exceptions only (if not listed below, information was validated and entered as provided) :

1.) Robert Bandini
This one got a little more confusing. The question is: who was driving with whom on the 1919 Indy 500? What were the driver/riding mechanic pairs - Le Coq and Mollinard in one car, and Thurman and Bandini in another? Or a different combination, as Le Coq/Bandini and Thurman/Mollinard?

According to Barry's sources, Bandini and his driver Louis LeCocq died on 30 May 1919 when their car crashed on the South Chute during the Indy 500. This is corroborated by Johnson's Indy 500 Website (note that Johnson mixes the spellings "Mollinard" and "Molinero" in consecutive lines - more about Mollinard/Molinero issue below).

However... as far as I know (also confirmed by Motorsport.com statistics), it was Nicolas Mollinard that was the riding mechanic of Louis Le Coq in the tragic 1919 Indianapolis 500 (note that Motorsport.com calls Nicolas Mollinard as "Nicolas Molinero". However, it seems me that “Molinero” is a phonetic interpretation of the name Mollinard, made by some contemporaneous newspapers, that was later copied time and again).

We seem to agree that Louis Le Coq was driving a Duesenberg "Roamer", got loose on lap 97 and hit the Turn 2 wall head-on, exploding upon impact and killing both occupants immediately. But was really Mollinard his riding mechanic? The prospect of having two French names – Le Coq and Mollinard – seems appealing, but would that be true? Or was Robert Bandini Le Coq’s unfortunate team mate?

Also, I believe the driver's name is Le Coq's, and not LeCoq. I think LeCoq is an anglicisation – as commonly practiced in the United States, where French pronouns and nouns are usually put together). The form “LeCocq”, used by some sources (including the very complete Johnson's Indy 500 Website), is even less likely (but not impossible).

Now let’s go back to Robert Bandini. We know that Robert Bandini also perished during that same race (or in consequence of an accident that took place during that race) – but was he riding with Le Coq or with Arthur Thurman, that crashed a Duesenberg at Turn 3? Is it possible that Bandini was Thurman's co-driver?

In my opinion:
- Le Coq and Mollinard were paired and perished instantly (on lap 97);
- Thurman and Bandini were paired, crashed on lap 45 and passed away after the race (date still unknown – particularly Bandini's date of death, as I guess he died some days later).

Who can, please, shed some light on this? Does anyone have copies of the official International Motor Speedway files?

(in any case, please mention your source, as we are facing a situation where people are quoting people and we are not sure where the information is coming from)


2.) Biagio Nazzaro
We are listing his place of death "near Strasbourg" (see posting by Roger Clark on the first page of the thread "Motorsport memorials"). Any comments?
Also, what was the title of the race? (It was not GP de l' A. C. F, as this one took place in Miramas in 1926, the year Nazzaro died)


3.)Dan Shaw (and Vic Spooner)
The sources you mentioned state that the crash happened in the Salem, NH track on 12 October 1925, but... according to Motorsport.com files, compiled by Phil Harms, the 1925 AAA Championship had a race in Laurel on 24 October 1925, followed by an event in the Rockingham Speedway in Salem, New Hampshire, a week later.

Still as per Motorsport.com, Spooner died during practice in the 1.25-mil board oval at Laurel (Harms cites Ken McMaken and Bill Hunter as sources). However, his report of the following race – the one in Salem – “brings Spooner back from the dead”, as he listed as DNQ due to a practice accident. And Phil Harms notes that “one source indicates that Spooner was fatally injured in his practice accident”...

Now, who can clarify these questions:
- where were Spooner and Shaw killed?
- just as a conjecture, is it possible that Spooner and Shaw were killed in Salem during a private test session (*), and as the Laurel race was the next one in the calendar the crash became incorrectly identified with this latter track?
- can someone please check the “Board Track” book by Al Krause?

(*) note that in the early decades of racing the expression “private test”, or even “series test” as we know them today, were seldom used – “practice” was the preferred form.

To make things more puzzling, Barry Lake’s posting says that the crash took place “in the opening day at the track” – and Allen Brown in his book “The History of America’s Speedways – Past & Present”, explains board tracks in both facilities – Laurel and Rockingham – were inaugurated in 1925, just a few months apart! (please note that the dates provided by Allen most likely refer to race dates, so his book does not rule out either of the two tracks...).


4.) Freddy Charlier
Barry, your source (Marcor Atlas F1) claims that his fatal crash happened on 23 June 1929 – but the book "Les Grandes Heures de Francorchamps", by Raymond Arets and Eric Faure, Editions Gamma, Tournai, Belgium, 1993, ISBN 2-7130-0562-0 state that that race happened on 6 and 7 July 1929... Does anyone know the precise date?

Coincidentally, the most recent issue of the magazine Motorsport has an interesting article by Bill Boddy about these early 24-hour races in Belgium. According to this reference, the 1924 race was called Belgian Grand Prix, Belgian Touring Car Grand Prix in 1925 and then... what was it named in 1929?

(Arets and Faure’s book call it 24 Heures de Spa-Francorchamps, but I believe they just applied the current title to an old race)

(and Bill Boddy’s article clarifies that two gendarmes – in separate accidents - , and not one (as we had thought so far), were killed in the 1929 edition)


5.) Herman Schurch
Barry, the more detailed sources we both have state that his crash happen in 1931 not 1932, so we will state the first until proved wrong.
Question: can someone confirm that the Legion Ascot Speedway was located in Los Angeles in 1931? Was Alhambra (that the locals in California pronounce "Alahambra") an incorporated city in 1931?


6.) Irineu Correa
The spelling of his name may be Corrêa. Correia, another possibility, has been ruled out. We will keep Correa in the database until proved wrong.
The name of the race should be "Grande Prêmio da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro" (not "Grande Prêmio da Cidade de Rio de Janeiro")


7.) Wilbur Brink
Putting two things together – the date of the crash as informed by Barry Lake and this race report at Motorsport.com - we can conclude that the accident that killed the young Wilbur Brink happened during the race. See also this page at Find A Grave.com (that gives his full name, Wilbur C. Brink, and year of birth, 1919; additionally, most sources quote his age as 11, a few other state 12).


8.) Carlo Pedrazzini
Your posting call his car a voiturette. However, as it was a three-liter Maserati 8CM, it was a Grand Prix car, not a voiturette, right?


9.) Giuseppe Campari, Baconin Borzacchini and Stanislaus Czaykowski
What was the official name of the race – Gran Premio di Monza or Gran Premio d’Italia? Or, is it possible that the qualifying heats – like the one where Campari and Borzacchini were killed – were called Gran Premio di Monza, reserving the title Gran Premio d’Italia to the final, when Czaykowski perished?

(my apologies if sometimes I ask questions that may have an obvious or easy-to-find answer to some of you. My (limited) library is spread between United States, Brazil and Switzerland, so I cannot check most of my own books and magazines)


10.) Luigi Arcangeli
Still to confirm what was the official name of the race: Gran Premio di Monza? Grande Premio d’Italia? Something else?


11.) Johnny Hannon
According to Barry’s sources he "called Conshohocker, Pennsylvania, his home". The Indianapolis Star newspaper website states that he was from "Norristown, PA". Now, who knows where was Hannon born?
Also, was did his accident took place during practice or a private test?

(again, info from the official Indianapolis Motor Speedway files are needed...)


12.) Al Gordon and Spider Matlock
Ok, no questions about the date of accident – 26 January 1936. Barry’s posting seem to confirm that Al Gordon died that same night. But what can we say about William “Spider” Matlock – did he expire on 26 or 27 January?

We would be very appreciative if you could name your sources when replying to this message.

Thanking your attention,


Muzza

#1215 David McKinney

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Posted 25 December 2003 - 21:17

2 Don't quite understand the Miramas connection. Nazzaro's accident was in the 1922 GP de l'ACF at Strasbourg
5 I have Schurch's accident in 1931, at Oakland. Is that where Legion Ascot was?
9 The Italian GP was held in the morning, and the heats and final of the Monza GP, in which all three accidents occurred, in the afternoon

#1216 gerrit stevens

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Posted 25 December 2003 - 21:52

I have not taken the time to read all the posts but I think it's worthwile to add another source. I don't know if it has been mentioned before but I think it is fairly complete until Swede Savage (1973). Also non drivers mentioned in "Their Last lap at Indy" by Nanonie Barber. I think the same (and more) info can be found on the internet but I thought it worthwile mentioning this book about such a sad topic.

Gerrit Stevens

#1217 Muzza

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 01:39

Hello David McKinney and Gerrit Stevens,

Thanks for your replies!

To David:
2.) Biagio Nazzaro
According to Peter Higham in "The International Motor Racing Guide" and to a few other sources (Racing Circuits, by Daniel King - please click on France and then on any circuit, MotorLegend.com and to this page), the 1926 Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France was raced in Miramas. I remember the story of this race - as I knew that the the GP de l'ACF was held in Miramas only once, and that only three cars showed up for the start - but I was unable to pinpoint the year by memory. Are all these sources wrong? Was the Strasbourg race in which Nazzaro died the 1926 GP de l'ACF instead? Or, if not, what was the name of that race?

5.) Herman Schurch
May I ask what is the source for the information that puts Schurch crash in Oakland? I ask that because - as far as I know - the only track operating in that town in November of 1931 was the Oakland Speedway, that had just been inaugurated (as per Allen Brown's "The History of America's Speedways - Past and Present"). Brown mentions an unnamed fatality on the Oakland Speedway road course, but I believe that Schurch's accident happened on an oval.
Just as a clarification, one has to be careful when mentioning "Ascot" tracks in California, as there were at least four facilities (!) with such a name:
- the original Ascot, in Florence (Los Angeles), active 1912-1919, 1.0-mile dirt and oiled dirt oval;
- Ascot Park, in Gardena (also Greater Los Angeles), active 1957-1990 in different configurations, sometimes known as Bill McKay's Los Angeles Speedway), place of fatal accidents of Don Branson and Dick Atkins;
- Ascot Speedway, 1/7-mile dirt oval, operated only on 1952, sometimes called New Ascot Speedway;
- the most famous (and dangerous) of all, the Legion Ascot Speedway, operational 1924-1936, and site of many fatalities (some source claims as many as 30 - Al Gordon, Bob Carey, Spider Matlock amongst them, maybe also Herman Schurch). There is a great book about this track, but I saw it only once and, unfortunately I did not take note of the title or the name of the author...
All things considered, it is more likely that Schurch perished in the Legion Ascot Speedway than in Oakland but... this is still to be confirmed.

9.) Giuseppe Campari, Baconin Borzacchini and Stanislaus Czaykowski
Thanks, David! I remembered reading something like that many years ago about the GP d'Italia/GP di Monza titles used in 1933, but I could not recall the details, and I am presently unable of researching most of my own books and magazines.

To Gerrit
Thanks for the reference, we will look around for it!

Regards,


Muzza

#1218 Frank S

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 03:17

Panoramics by Thomas Luce:

Sundown at Ascot Park, 1990

#1219 Jim Thurman

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 03:45

Originally posted by Muzza
Dear Fellows,
1.) Robert Bandini
This one got a little more confusing. The question is: who was driving with whom on the 1919 Indy 500? What were the driver/riding mechanic pairs - Le Coq and Mollinard in one car, and Thurman and Bandini in another? Or a different combination, as Le Coq/Bandini and Thurman/Mollinard?

Now let’s go back to Robert Bandini. We know that Robert Bandini also perished during that same race (or in consequence of an accident that took place during that race) – but was he riding with Le Coq or with Arthur Thurman, that crashed a Duesenberg at Turn 3? Is it possible that Bandini was Thurman's co-driver?

In my opinion:
- Le Coq and Mollinard were paired and perished instantly (on lap 97);
- Thurman and Bandini were paired, crashed on lap 45 and passed away after the race (date still unknown – particularly Bandini's date of death, as I guess he died some days later).

Who can, please, shed some light on this? Does anyone have copies of the official International Motor Speedway files?

(in any case, please mention your source, as we are facing a situation where people are quoting people and we are not sure where the information is coming from)


I can confirm that Robert Bandini rode with Thurman. That one is rather close to me ;) Years ago, long before this great resource, I tried tracing family roots and it was a good possibility that Arthur Thurman was a relative. Unfortunately, it appears I'm related only distantly at best (source: Indianapolis 500 by Jack Fox and literally every other source I have seen on the subject). Sorry I overlooked that one in Barry's post. I was concentrating on 1950's on. I'll check later and see what "The Tribute Project" has. Confirming dates of pre-1952 deaths is not as easy.

5.) Herman Schurch
Barry, the more detailed sources we both have state that his crash happen in 1931 not 1932, so we will state the first until proved wrong.
Question: can someone confirm that the Legion Ascot Speedway was located in Los Angeles in 1931? Was Alhambra (that the locals in California pronounce "Alahambra") an incorporated city in 1931?



Again, this one I'll check "The Tribute Project", which also gives the name of the driver or mechanic that died in tests on the dirt road course at Oakland Speedway (no less than Earl Warren stopped the race from taking place after a couple of major incidents during practice). On Alhambra...I don't know whether it was incorporated by 1931 or not, but it's a moot point since Legion Ascot actually was in the Los Angeles city limits (source: "Where They Raced" by Harold Osmer - Harold's specialty is mapping and he was very thorough on precise locations). Muzza, I grew in Southern California and never once heard anyone pronounce it that way - Al-HAM-bruh and Awl-homm-bruh (Spanish) being the ones I heard. A city in Northern California has a high school, water district, etc., named Alhambra as well and those two pronounciations are what I heard there as well.

12.) Al Gordon and Spider Matlock

Ok, no questions about the date of accident – 26 January 1936. Barry’s posting seem to confirm that Al Gordon died that same night. But what can we say about William “Spider” Matlock – did he expire on 26 or 27 January?[/B]



And, again, let me check "The Tribute Project" to see what it has for the Gordon-Matlock accident. Everything I have seen referred to Matlock "dying the next day".

I would really like to find a way to get a copy of "The Tribute Project" to you, Doug Nye and Barry Lake...but apparently there aren't any remaining copies and I've yet to hear back from the new project leader.


Jim Thurman

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#1220 Barry Lake

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 03:55

Biagi Nazzaro

The Grand Prix de l'ACF was run on an 8.3 mile (approximately) road circuit at Strasbourg on 15 July 1922. That is 1922, NOT 1926.

The race was won by Felice Nazzaro in a Fiat.

Biagi Nazzaro, also in (on) a Fiat, crashed on the 51st lap of the 60 lap race.

From "The French Grand Prix" by David Hodges:

"As Biagio Nazzaro was reaching maximum speed about half a mile from the Eintzheim hairpin his car threw a rear wheel, hit a tree and turned end over end to come to rest against another. Young Nazzaro was killed immediately."


Le Coq and friends

I have a little booklet "Forgotten Heroes of the Speedway: The Riding Mechanics" which lists the riding mechanics, alongside the name of their driver, for all Indianapolis 500 Mile races from 1911 to 1937.

For 1919, in part:

"18 Louis LeCocq/ Robert Bandini...
27 Arthur Thurman/ Nick Molinairo..."

Note the spelling "Molinairo" just to add to the confusion.

The booklet says it is based on research by Tom Rollings, but does not mention his sources. There are acknowledgements to 15 people, of whom only Louis Meyer is immediately recognisable to me. IMS (Indianapolis Motor Speedway) is noted as the source of photos used "with permission".

Of interest is the reproduction of a couple of copies of "Racing Mechanician Annual License" from 1935 and 1936.

#1221 Barry Lake

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 04:14

The various Ascot speedways had for many years had me confused, so I asked on the Racing History forum if the experts on US oval racing history could explain them to me.

Here are copies of the relevant replies:

_________________________________________________________________

Ascot Speedways

April 2001

Phil Harms and I have done a bit of research into the four tracks
called Ascot in Southern California. The following is a short article
I prepared to summarize their arrival, operation, and demise.
(Harold Osmer)

ASCOT SPEEDWAY 1903-1920
(“SPEEDWAY” added by Barry Lake)
There have been four tracks called Ascot in Southern California. The first opened as a horse racing facility in December 1903. On June 11, 1904 Charles Burman (no relation to speed king "Wild Bob" Burman) won the first auto event, taking victory while covering the mile at a speed of 38.3 mph. Burman drove a stock Peerless touring car and carried five passengers.
Ascot's 160-acre site was annexed to Los Angeles in 1906. Automobiles became the staple show after horse racing was outlawed in 1910. Top national drivers in town for AAA road racing at Santa Monica and Corona would regularly test, compete, and conduct match races at Ascot. Joining local drivers Tetzlaff, Dingley, and Nikrent were the likes of Oldfield, Harroun, and DePalma. Most auto events were AAA sanctioned.
As with most horse venues, owners refused to allow pressing, oiling, or even watering of the track. They were fearful of hardening the surface and thus rendering it useless for horses. Once betting on horses became illegal, the dust was alleviated. Racing became faster, yet safer, more exciting, and easier to view from the grandstands. The racing surface was banked and covered with cement in 1916.
Race cars making regular podium appearances at the Vanderbilt Cup and other long distance road races rarely finished well at Ascot. Then as now, machines designed for one type of course found themselves outmatched when the rules changed.
The last event for Ascot was held on Thanksgiving Day, 1919. After lasting nearly twenty years, the facility was in need of serious repairs. A first-class board track speedway was under construction in the small town of Beverly Hills and repairs were not forthcoming.
Ascot owners closed their doors following a rodeo event in April 1920. What had begun as a horse venue, went out the same way.

LEGION ASCOT SPEEDWAY – January 1924 to January 1936
New Ascot Speedway opened in January 1924. The 5/8-mile oiled track was fast, exciting, and played directly into the hands of drivers and car builders daring enough to challenge for the AAA National Dirt Driving Championship.
Located in East Los Angeles, this track operated under a variety of often feuding land owners. American Legion Post 127 ran the place with the greatest efficiency-hence the name Legion Ascot. The track was dangerous, but no more so than any other dirt track of the 1920s. And there were a few drivers actually making a living out of racing cars.
Exploits, records, and stories of drivers coming from Legion Ascot are documented elsewhere. The last race was held in January 1936.
Suffice to say that in the 1920s and '30s, everyone knew that the road to Indianapolis went straight through places like Legion Ascot.

SOUTHERN ASCOT SPEEDWAY – June 1936 to 1942
(Southern Speedway June 1936 to January 1938; Southern Ascot Speedway January 1938 to 1942)
There were two other tracks called Ascot in Southern California. George Robson in a roadster took the initial checkered at Southern Speedway in June 1936. The 1/2-mile oval carried the Ascot banner from January 1938 until the track closed in 1942. Southern Ascot Speedway was never as famous, or infamous, as Legion Ascot. But whenever you see old race photos with guys hanging off a railroad bridge in the background, that's Southern Ascot.

ASCOT PARK-GARDENA – May 1957 to November 1990
Ascot Park opened in Gardena, just south of Los Angeles, in May 1957.
Though well outside the scope of When The Earth Moved, a brief mention of this 1/2-mile oval track-which hosted over 100 motorsport events each year for 33 years-had to be made. Ascot Park's last event was held November 22, 1990. Ironically enough, the first and last tracks called Ascot closed to auto racing after a Thanksgiving Day race.
Harold Osmer


The first Ascot was a dual purpose track, horses and cars. A 1 mile dirt which operated from 1903 to 1919. In the last few years it was more paved than dirt. Horse racing was outlawed (the betting part of it) in, I believe 1911, which made it mostly a auto racing venue. ASCOT SPEEDWAY (BL)

Legion Ascot (named for the long-time promotion by the Glendale American Legion
post) was a 5/8 mile oiled dirt from 1924 through 1936. LEGION ASCOT SPEEDWAY (BL)

Southern Ascot was 1 1/2 mile dirt which ran from 1935 to 1942. SOUTHERN ASCOT SPEEDWAY (BL)

Ascot Park was a 1/2 mile dirt oval in Gardena and operated from 1957-1990.
Except for the first few years, the leaseholder and promoter was J C Agajanian and his family. ASCOT PARK-GARDENA (BL).

All are covered in great detail in member Harold Osmer's book "Lap2". You can get it from Amazon but Harold makes more if you contact him directly.
Phil Harms


Harold and Phil,
Isn't it true that the Culver City board track was called New Ascot Motor
Speedway at one time?
Also what about the small 1/7 mile dirt track in Venice, California that ran
TQ midgets in 1952. I thought it too was called Ascot Speedway (aka: New
Ascot Speedway)? It's the one that was located on Washington Blvd.
Phil, what was the date that Mr. Burman won that first race at California's
original Ascot?
Allan Brown


17 April 2001
Harold & Phil,
Very true that the board track at Culver City opened after Legion Ascot, but
I think the Culver City site was a former horse track and there was a one
mile dirt track that probably ran auto races in 1923 & early 1924 as well as
1927 (inside of the board track that year). After the board track was torn
out, a 1.25 mile dirt track replaced it and it may have ran auto races in
1928 & 1929.
I like Jim Thurman's explanation of the little track at Culver City
Speedway.
Allan Brown


17 April 2001
The small track on Washington, near Venice may have been the Culver
City Speedway at Washington and Lincoln. I am aware of no other track
in that area, except as mentioned in your History.

Culver City Speedway was initially a dog track and has an interesting
history all its own in that the desire to build this track came from
gambling concerns. There is a narrow strip of land connecting Culver
City proper to the track site. Thus when dog races were weld, folks
were free to wager away. Seems that while Los Angeles (which owns all
surrounding land in the area) had ordinances against gambling, they
were not averse to adjusting a boundary here or there to accommodate
their needs. Cars were popular there for many years. I have seen
nothing in newspaper or race reports calling this Ascot, though they
may have tried using the name during one their many "managerial
transitions." If you can confirm it's use of the name, I want to know
about it.

The board track was well east of the small oval and operated from
1924 through 27. The site was previously a horse track. Opening day
was Thanksgiving, November 27, 1924. This was delayed by weather
until Decmber 14. Legion Ascot Speedway, then known as New Ascot
Motor Speedway, opened earlier that same year on January 20, so it is
unlikely that the Culver City board track was ever called Ascot.

The name Ascot did indeed come from the old English horse track.
Builders at the first LA Ascot (a horse track) were hoping to
capitalize on the name. This track closed in 1919, Legion Ascot
appeared in 1924 and operated through 1934. Southern Ascot ran from
1935 to 1942 (and ran under a number of names before settling on
Southern Ascot). The name was vacant until the aforementioned 1952
possibility. Ascot Park in Gardena first opened in 1957 under the
name of New Los Angeles Speedway before changing once or twice
enroute to becoming Ascot Park.

The name Ascot is not legally protected as far as I am aware, but the
Agajanian family will stand squarely in your way if you try to use it
without first gaining their permission. As brother Cary is a lawyer
and willing to run with it, you could spend a lot of time winning in
litigation.

Harold O.


17 April 2001
Ascot England is famous for its horse racing. Biggest event is the Gold Cup,
I think. As horse racing in England is on turf, there is tittle cross over
with motors. However in the earliest pre-WW1 days, Brooklands copied horsey
terms for their new sport. Thus we have the paddock, the clerk of the course &
the stewards. Aintree built a road course around the horse course. Goodwood
race course, Goodwood Airfield/Hist race circuit, & Goodwood park which
contains the Festival of Speed are separate sites within the Duke of
Richmond's vast estate.
Rob Trebble
Lincs, England


I believe one of the Ascots, either 1 or 2 had a road course also. Stan Cowan


--- In racinghistory@y..., "H. Donald Capps" wrote:
> I read somewhere thatMorrow started it in 1951. For those
> interested, Harry Morrow was the man behind Autobooks in Burbank. I
> spent many a dollar there.....
> This organization later changed its name to the Formula Racing
> Association in 1960. It had a column in SCG until March 1966 when
> they got booted by the new staff. Official word by SCG was that the
> FRA needed to get together with the SCCA and
> hammer things out.
> It still makes for interesting reading to look over the old FRA
> Bulletins in SCG. The race in Monterrey, Mexico is one that I wish
> I knew more about. It seemed like a neat idea.

The FRA Bulletins continued in 1966 (and I believe 1967) in Motor
Classics, a West Coast racing newspaper. They did run at some
interesting places...tying in with a recent post to another thread,
they ran on a dirt road course in the infield at Ascot Park, they
raced on at least two layouts at Hanford Motor Speedway, an airport
course at Vina (in the Sacramento Valley) and Orange County
International Raceway, among others.
And, to tie in with yet another recent thread, this one on athletes
and celebrities that raced...Nick Reynolds of the Kingston Trio raced
with the FRA.
Jim Thurman


20 April 2001
Allan, I think it might prove out that the 1/7 mile dirt track was
located inside the larger Culver City Speedway and was referred to
as "Little Ascot", maybe quite informally.
I have a family friend who raced TQ Midgets in their early days and
he mentioned racing at a small track inside the 1/4 mile at Culver
City. I'll check with him.
Jim Thurman


Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2003 05:18:25 -0000
From: "fawbro1 "
Subject: Re: Carrell Speedway Photos

Carrell Speedway was closed to allow Artesia Blvd. to be extended
through the track property. For many years, remains of the track,
grandstands and crash walls were visible on both sides of Artesia
Blvd. I have never seen any photos of this, but I remember it
vividly. Nothing remains of the track today. Ascot, of course, was
built only about a mile south of Carrell on the opposite side of
Vermont Ave.

Chuck Fawcett

___________________________________________________________________


Muzza mentioned the book "Legion Ascot Speedway". I have been told by respected researchers of this area of the sport that the book is good for the photos but carries many inaccuracies in the text and should be treated with the utmost caution.

Barry Lake

#1222 Jim Thurman

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 06:58

Ok, I checked "The Tribute Project", and here's what it had...

Robert Bandini
It lists Bandini as riding with LeCocq and Molinaro with Thurman. Source is listed as Indy News Record Book

So, obviously, I can't confirm Robert Bandini as riding with Arthur Thurman. I had never seen anything listing otherwise until Barry's source and The Tribute Project. When I contacted IMS about Arthur Thurman in the early 1980's, the then historian sent me info that had Bandini with Thurman. IIRC, this was the way it was listed in Fox's book, and nearly everything else I've seen, has it that way...yet these other two have them reversed :confused: (perhaps this all got started from a single incorrect labelling of a photo?)

Surely if Bandini was fatally injured and Molinaro survived, they would not have mixed them up...surely? This would lead me to speculate Bandini was in fact riding mechanic with LeCocq.

Herman Schurch
Listed as taking place at Oakland Speedway, Oakland, California on 7.November.1931 during practice. Norman F. Wagner has year as 1932 (Lloyd Cradler/Fox Sprint Car History pg. 250).

Correction: Schurch's accident listed as taking place at Legion Ascot. I have no idea why I entered the wrong data!

And now to the previously unnamed fatality on the Oakland Speedway road course...
Jimmy McBride
3.May.1934. Charlie Ross has date as 2.May, John Will has him listed as a mechanic (Charlie Ross/John E. Will/Lloyd Cradler).

I'll have to check my notes as I recall running across this while researching Goshen Speedway (Goshen, California) for 1934. As I recall, the newspaper account listed him as a riding mechanic.

While far from infallible, "The Tribute Project" certainly had a lot of very good people working on it.

#1223 fines

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 13:10

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Muzza
1.) Robert Bandini[/QUOTE]
I have never heared of anything other than Bandini riding with LeCocq. There's a picture in "Board Track - Guts, Gold & Glory" of the Uniontown lineup May 17, showing Bandini and LeCocq standing side-by-side - could be coincidence, and anyhow I have never seen another picture of these men, so I can't be sure if the caption's right.
2.) Biagio Nazzaro[/QUOTE]
As already mentioned, the accident was in 1922.
3.)Dan Shaw (and Vic Spooner)[/QUOTE]
The confusion probably stems from the postponing of the Salem-Rockingham race, originally scheduled for Oct 17, with Qualifications starting on Oct 12 (when the accident definitely happened). The first rain date on Oct 19 was also rained out, and since Laurel was on schedule for Oct 24 (subsequently postponed to Oct 26), it was decided to run the race two weeks late. Spooner may have been entered for the Laurel race, but I doubt it. More likely one of the (very few) flaws in Phil's database.
5.) Herman Schurch[/QUOTE]
I have never seen anything other than 1931, and anyways I have no record of Schurch racing after Nov 1931. Wallen reports that he "had been married 19 days". The accident happened at Legion Ascot.
11.) Johnny Hannon[/QUOTE]
From memory, I'm pretty sure it was official practice, and his first ever lap on the Speedway. Wasn't his crash the catalyst for the subsequent rookie tests?

#1224 Marcor

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 19:43

I hope I've not added some confusions about Freddy Charlier. Freddy Charlier had his fatal crash on July 6, 1929 (first day of the GP de Belgique des 24 Heures). On June 23, he had won his last race at Thuin (Belgium).

About the Bill Body's article in Motorsport, I've found some little mistakes.
1)- Read Chenard not Chénard
2)- In 1928, read Dubois not Duboid
3)- In 1929, read Baron Kervijn de Lettenhove, not Lettenherve. He crashed the Minerva #1, killing 1 gendarme and injuring three others. Two fatalities were enough, no other people were killed during this race.

#1225 Jim Thurman

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Posted 26 December 2003 - 23:41

Originally posted by fines

I have never heared of anything other than Bandini riding with LeCocq. There's a picture in "Board Track - Guts, Gold & Glory" of the Uniontown lineup May 17, showing Bandini and LeCocq standing side-by-side - could be coincidence, and anyhow I have never seen another picture of these men, so I can't be sure if the caption's right.

11.) Johnny Hannon

From memory, I'm pretty sure it was official practice, and his first ever lap on the Speedway. Wasn't his crash the catalyst for the subsequent rookie tests?

On Bandini, not only this...

http://members.cox.n...guy/18Indy.html

But I swear, the copy of the photo of Arthur Thurman sent me by IMS had Bandini as his mechanic!

Worse yet, various sources have both Bandini and Molinard (sic) as fatalities. One being the Indianapolis Star-News!. Some have told me there were obvious errors with the Star-News record book...I guess so :rolleyes:

And as I understand it, Johnny Hannon's accident was the catalyst for rookie tests.

Michael, nice to see you back :up: If you'll check, you'll find a thread where I mention you and ReWind wondering what had happened to you.

I was worried we'd be reading about you in Der Bild :lol:


Jim Thurman

#1226 Barry Lake

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Posted 27 December 2003 - 08:22

Lingenfelter Performance Engineering, Inc.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We are sad to announce that John Lingenfelter, founder of Lingenfelter Performance Engineering, passed away yesterday, December 25th, 2003. John had been in a semi-comatose state since November 2002 when he entered into a coma during surgery that was necessary due to a racing accident in Pomona, California in October 2002. Lingenfelter Performance Engineering will be closed Monday December 29th so our employees may attend the services. Funeral Arrangements For John Lingenfelter


Viewing Sunday December 28, 2003 - 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Zwick & Jahn Funeral Home
520 North Second Street
Decatur, IN 46733

To view obituary or send condolences to the family
http://obit.zwickjah...listing=Current

Funeral Service Monday December 29, 2003 - 10:00 AM
The Bridge Church
1403 Winchester Road
Decatur, IN 46733

Memorials should be sent to the Funeral Home

#1227 Barry Lake

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Posted 27 December 2003 - 08:29

Originally posted by Muzza

Coincidentally, the most recent issue of the magazine Motorsport has an interesting article by Bill Boddy about these early 24-hour races in Belgium. According to this reference, the 1924 race was called Belgian Grand Prix, Belgian Touring Car Grand Prix in 1925 and then... what was it named in 1929?
Muzza


From Marcor (he forgot to answer this one in his post):

1929: Grand Prix de Belgique des 24 Heures.

#1228 Muzza

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Posted 27 December 2003 - 23:59

Originally posted by maxie
Scanning Muzza's gigantic list, some additions perhaps can be made (Source: The Chequered Flag: 100 Years of Motor Racing)

1937: Warford and Rhode were killed at the end of the practice week of Indy 500, not during the race proper. And Rhode was the chief engineer of the Champion Spark Plug Company who was working at the pits when the car driven by Overton Phillips (with Warford as the riding mechanic) crashed into the pits.


Hello, maxie,

Thanks for your posting, that cascaded on a little research and a few corrections on the events of 27 May 1937. Please check this posting by Barry Lake and this one by Fines for additional information on George Warford and Otto Rhode.

It seems that Warford was a firefighter; concerning Rhode, we are listing his as a mechanic (would that be innacurate? Should we create a "crew member" role? And, even though, would the "crew member" label fit him well?)

Barry Lake (or Fines) , can you please confirm whether Warford passed away on the 27th?

Originally posted by maxie
1959.9.13:

Alfredo Tinazzo and Antonio Criballeri were killed in the junior race which preceeded the Grand Prix at Monza.

(Source: The Chequered Flag: 100 Years of Motor Racing)

It's pretty late now and I wonder there must be more hidden gems in this book. I'll try to find and post them when I have time.


Owing to Stefan Örnerdal (please check this page on his Formula 2 Register website), that crash actually happened on 28 June 1959. The Formula Junior race in which Tinazzo and Crivalleri (this is the correct spelling) perished was a preliminary to the Gran Premio della Lotteria di Monza for Sportscars, not the Formula 1 Gran Premio d'Italia.

Considering the nature of the Formula Junior races of then and of the Circuito Stradale di Monza, I guess Tinazzo and Crivalleri were involved in the same accident – who knows a little more about this?

maxie, what is the author of the book you are quoting (I think there is more than one with such a title).

Originally posted by maxie
1925:

Paul Torchy was killed in the Spanish GP.


Thanks! Just a little correction - there was no Spanish GP in 1925; that race was officially called Grand Prix de San Sebástian.

Regards,

Muzza

#1229 Muzza

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Posted 28 December 2003 - 18:39

A correction on my posting immediately above: the correct spelling is Antonio Crivellari.

And Stefan Örnerdal confirmed that Crivellari and Tinazzo were killed in a multiple car accident. Citing John Blunsden's "Formula Junior", Stefan writes "Bordeau [note by Muzza: actually Bordeu] was in the lead, behind him there was a fierce battle with 5 drivers. Drivers chopped and changed position all around the circuit. On the 8th lap there was a multiple pile-up at the Vialone curve, Crivellari and Tinazzo collided, both cars virtually destroyed and both drivers killed almost instantly. Roberto Lippi was also involved in the crash."

#1230 kstrt

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Posted 28 December 2003 - 19:38

Are there photos of this accident?

#1231 ReWind

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Posted 28 December 2003 - 20:59

Originally posted by kstrt
Are there photos of this accident?

I hope there ain't any.

In Ivan Rendall's book "The Chequered Flag" (which is the source of maxie's earlier post) there is an artist's impression of the crash and a desription that the collision "shocked even the most hardened spectators". Who wants to see real life pictures of such a desaster?

#1232 kstrt

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Posted 28 December 2003 - 21:20

I only asked for pictures because I think that on that impression, it shows the accident after a right turn, and I think, at the oval.

#1233 Paul Taylor

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Posted 28 December 2003 - 22:00

Although it's a sad subject, what happened to the drivers? Did they get thrown out of the cars, or did something else happen? :|

#1234 Muzza

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Posted 29 December 2003 - 03:27

Fellows,

I "upgraded" (note quotes) my computer to Windows XP and, in consequence, I spent the whole day trying to sort an unbelievable amount of problems.

I am finally able to post here, but it seems that I lost my address book (with your e-addresses) and all the e-mails I exchanged since 1996 (this means thousands and thousands of messages - that had "survived" several other migrations and computer changes). I also lost my Internet Explorer favorites. Apparently there is no way I can import any of these. Unnecessary to say, I am quite mad right now (I even "lost" all applications installed in my computer - including Office, Photoshop, you name it -, and I had to re-install everything again...)

The good news is that the Motorsport Memorial files have been backed up, and are all fine. But I will be unable to update the website until this mess is sorted out. Please allow me a few days. I am sorry.

Next time I will definitely buy a Mac.


Muzza

P.S.: I know this is not the right forum to ask for such type of help, but there are many messages in my inbox that contained important information, data that pertains to Motorsport Memorial. If any of you knows how I can "revive" my e-mail settings, address book and favorites (I just cannot import them!!!), please send me a private message. Thanks a lot.

#1235 Barry Lake

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Posted 29 December 2003 - 09:49

Vale Keith Hutton
8/13/2003 ... Registered News Services

Article From Speedcar World - www.speedcarworld.com.au

Oskaloosa, Ia. - A driver was killed in an accident during the C-feature of the Ultimate Challenge Tuesday night at Southern Iowa Speedway.

Mahaska Hospital spokesman Bruce Spahr confirmed late Tuesday the accident was fatal but would not release a name, pending arrival of relatives.

Rescue crews rushed Keith Hutton to Mahaska Hospital after his car cartwheeled down the front stretch of the dirt track early in the race. Hutton, a former racer in his native Australia, has been a mechanic for Knoxville driver Don Droud Jr.

Hutton, who moved to Knoxville with his wife, Jenny, had worked as a mechanic for World of Outlaws driver Randy Hannigan prior to joining Droud's crew.

This spring, Hutton was a leader in the Hoosier Tire Midwest Masters Classic 360 race - a race for drivers over the age of 50 - at Knoxville before finishing third.

After the accident, Southern Iowa Speedway officials canceled the C-feature. Sean Walden, the pole-winner, was declared the winner. Complete results of the Ultimate Challenge, a non-winged event, were not available when this edition of The Register went to press.

Nearly 5,500 fans had turned out to watch a field of 67 drivers - double the number that entered last year - compete for the $30,000 first prize.

The last driver killed on an Iowa track was Mark Wilson of Des Moines, who died of head injuries during practice at Knoxville on April 14, 2001.

#1236 Vitesse2

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Posted 29 December 2003 - 11:21

Originally posted by Muzza
P.S.: I know this is not the right forum to ask for such type of help, but there are many messages in my inbox that contained important information, data that pertains to Motorsport Memorial. If any of you knows how I can "revive" my e-mail settings, address book and favorites (I just cannot import them!!!), please send me a private message. Thanks a lot.


Muzza: you have enough posts to join Atlas' Paddock Club - computer queries are often raised there and usually solved - there's quite a few experts who hang around in PC. Just ignore anyone who says it's user error!

#1237 Milan Fistonic

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Posted 30 December 2003 - 09:04

Originally posted by Ben Murphy
I found a few others to add to the lists.

I
Jack Lanham was killed at Altona in his Vauxhall Lombard. There cars went into a corner side by side, Jack was in the middle and he got squeezed. He went up into the air and straight into these silly bolders they had lining the circut. This happened in 1954 but again i do not have a date. He was Australian.

Ben



Just came across this extra info in Australian Motor Sports, September 1954.

Jack Lanham died "at the begining of September" having been unconscious since his accident at Altona "late in March".

Perhaps Barry can provide the exact dates.

#1238 Barry Lake

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Posted 30 December 2003 - 10:00

Jack Lanham's crash at Altona was Monday 8 March 1954 (what holiday weekend is that?)

The date I have for his death is, Melbourne, Victoria, 4 September 1954.

Car was a Lombard Vauxhall open-wheeler, category would be Formule Libre, I would suggest, because racing cars were just racing cars in those days in Australia. There was no actual formula. The car was a Lombard with a Vauxhall engine.

Barry Lake



#1239 Ray Bell

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Posted 31 December 2003 - 15:01

The early March public holiday weekend in Thicktoria is Labor day...

Could that Lombard have been the Alf Barrett car from pre-war?

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#1240 Buford

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Posted 01 January 2004 - 01:36

Here is a list somebody has prepared.

http://www.toyracing...nnerscircle.htm

Why he has Jim Rathmann on it I do not know.

#1241 Jim Thurman

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Posted 01 January 2004 - 08:21

Originally posted by Buford
Here is a list somebody has prepared.

http://www.toyracing...nnerscircle.htm

Why he has Jim Rathmann on it I do not know.


Confusing the two again...

Actually he's right, since in reality "James" Rathmann died.

But, you know...


Jim Thurman

#1242 Buford

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Posted 01 January 2004 - 23:07

I was skimming around and found that. I didn't fully read his intro. I thought they were all racing deaths. Now I see he is including champions who are "gone" thus not necessarily a racing related death.

#1243 Jim Thurman

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Posted 02 January 2004 - 01:14

Buford,

Though they definitely fall into the off track category, should I ask you about Henry Pens and Bob Pronger?

Maybe that's for another thread...

...or not

#1244 Buford

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Posted 02 January 2004 - 02:39

Originally posted by Jim Thurman
Buford,

Though they definitely fall into the off track category, should I ask you about Henry Pens and Bob Pronger?

Maybe that's for another thread...

...or not


Hee hee. Most won't know what you are talking about. I didn't know Pens other than to see him race. Bob Pronger was one of my dad's good friends. He was one of our strongest competitors in the stock car days and he was hilarious. Tuffanelli ran the chop shops for the mob on the south side of Chicago and Pronger was one of his main boys. Somewhere along the way, Pronger disappeared. Tough crowd.

#1245 ReWind

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 19:13

Muzza - little pieces of information about Percy Lambert who died in 1913.

Complete name: Percy E. Lambert, date of accident & death: 21 October 1913, circuit: Brooklands, age: unknown, date of birth: unknown.

The date given by Barrie Hobkirk in this post is confirmed by this site.

The ghost story told by Megatron in this post you'll find on this site, too. But this site reveals a little bit of further information about Lambert's fatal crash as does this site although the date (1930, October 31st) is obviously wrong.

PS. While googling around searching on behalf of the Lambert case I came across this odd site about celebrities who died in auto incidents. Certainly a matter of taste but the infos seem to be serious and are at least partly racing related.

#1246 Paul Taylor

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 21:52

Does anyone know anything about the Sprintcar driver "Joe Farrugia" (I don't know how to spell it - Pronounced Joe Fa-r-oo-j-ee-a), who died in a crash at Parramatta Raceway? I'm not sure of the year, but it happened sometime around the 1980s and 1990s.

#1247 Ray Bell

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 23:44

..... 'Farrugia' is the correct spelling (usually)...

#1248 Barry Lake

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 00:34

Joe Farrugia was killed in a midget (known as a "speedcar" in Australia) NOT a sprintcar, at Parramatta City Raceway on 12 March 1993.

Source: Various daily newspapers of the time.

With full roll cages, good modern driver safety gear, harness, etc, and a track that (unusually for a speedway) has a large run-off area between it and the safety fences, such a fatality seemed an unlikely occurrence at this venue. But the grippy clay surface (for sprintcar racing) means that when the midgets "let go" they can perform multiple barrel-rolls. Just going from memory (I can check this if anyone wishes - I might be confusing it with another crash of the era) I think another car crashed into his roll cage after it had been damaged by the roll-overs.


I just checked. The other fatality I was thinking of was Rodney Day, also in a midget (speedcar), and also at Parramatta City Raceway, only weeks earlier. Day crashed on the night of 26 December 1992, died 28 December 1992.

So I am not sure of the details of each crash, but can ask the experts, if anyone wishes me to.

It was a tragic time for the speedcars in Australia. The previous speedcar fatality in Australia had been in 1975, by my books, and there have been none since Farrugia but, between the two already mentioned, Tony Boyle crashed a speedcar at South Australia's Speedway City on 22 January 1993 and died 28 January 1993.

Only three killed in the category, nation-wide in 28 years and all of them within about 10 weeks.

Source for the latter two, Graeme Frost in South Australia.

#1249 Barry Lake

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 01:26

Originally posted by ReWind
Complete name: Percy E. Lambert, date of accident & death: 21 October 1913, circuit: Brooklands, age: unknown, date of birth: unknown.


Doesn't the grave stone say "Aged 22 Years"?

That's what it looks like to me on the enlarged photo, although it seems very young.

#1250 Paul Taylor

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 03:39

Barry: Thanks a lot for the info.

There's a video that we were trying to identify at a racing forum, which happens to be Farrugia's fatal accident.

Taken from the video description:
In the video, you see a Sprintcar spin, after being pushed from behind coming out of a corner. The slow moving car rolls upside down harmlessly, but gets hit in the roll bar by another vehicle. Both cars flip into the air, and get collected by other vehicles. Finally, the race cars come to rest and there is a very small explosion of fire.