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Non-F1 Crazy Statistics


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#1 f1paul

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 19:35

Anything that isn't to do with F1 is allowed! 

numbers.jpg


Edited by f1paul, 13 October 2016 - 18:15.


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#2 f1paul

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 19:35

Here's one to start, after Sebastian Loeb's 1st FIA World Rallycross victory on Sunday, he became the first man to win a race in 3 different FIA disciplines. World Rx, WRC and WTCC. Congratulations Sebastian!  :clap:​ 



#3 CommanderShepard

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 20:03

Here's one to start, after Sebastian Loeb's 1st FIA World Rallycross victory on Sunday, he became the first man to win a race in 3 different FIA disciplines. World Rx, WRC and WTCC. Congratulations Sebastian! :clap:


Who is the one with the most wins in different categories? I know that Andretti won in F1, Le Mans and Indy.

#4 Yamamoto

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 20:23

Greenland Sharks have been known to live for over 400 years.



#5 Collombin

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 20:36

Who is the one with the most wins in different categories? I know that Andretti won in F1, Le Mans and Indy.


Andretti has won lots of things, but not Le Mans.

Guys from the 60s had a huge advantage over today's crop in terms of being allowed to demonstrate versatility though. Many of them won multiple categories.

#6 HistoryFan

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 21:12

Prema Power won races number 100 and 101 in F3 Euroseries/F3 European Championship. ART/ASM (76) and Mücke (45) follow.



#7 Radoye

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 02:02

Who is the one with the most wins in different categories? I know that Andretti won in F1, Le Mans and Indy.

 

Andretti's best result at Le Mans is 2nd, but he does have a Daytona 500 NASCAR win to his name. He won other sportscar races though.



#8 Amphicar

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 12:01

As we all know, only one driver, Graham Hill, has achieved the "triple crown" of winning the Indy 500, the Le Mans 24 Hours and the F1 World Championship (or the Monaco GP, if you prefer). However, although that achievement has not been matched by another driver, it has been achieved by an engine. As well as winning 155 F1 Grands Prix and 12 WDCs, the Cosworth DFV and its variants also won 10 Indy 500s and two Le Mans 24 Hour races - plus 5 Formula 3000 Championships for good measure.



#9 Henri Greuter

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 12:28

As we all know, only one driver, Graham Hill, has achieved the "triple crown" of winning the Indy 500, the Le Mans 24 Hours and the F1 World Championship (or the Monaco GP, if you prefer). However, although that achievement has not been matched by another driver, it has been achieved by an engine. As well as winning 155 F1 Grands Prix and 12 WDCs, the Cosworth DFV and its variants also won 10 Indy 500s and two Le Mans 24 Hour races - plus 5 Formula 3000 Championships for good measure.

 

I won't bother to look up where I posted this feat already since that was a number of years ago but there is an even more interesting detail to add to your claim, and that is the one I made back then.

 

Apart from having gained the triple crown to begin with: In one year the different versions of the Cosworth even managed to do it in a single year: 1980

 

Indy: Johnny Rutherford in the legendary Chaparral 2K-Cosworth DFX

Le Mans: Jean Rondeau & Jean Pierre Jassaud in a Rondeau M379-Cosworth DFL

Monaco: Carlos Reutemann in a Williams FW07B-Cosworth DFV

 

The rarity of this might become even more clear once you realize that Cossies won only two times at Le Mans, '75 and '80 while the F1 heydays were in the years from '68-'81 while the Indy Heydays were from '78 till '87 and thus the chance for an engine winning the triple crown within a single calendar year was not that big to begin with. But if there ever was a candidate engine to be able to pull it off, it was the Cosworth. I can't think of any other engine in existance that one way or another, in one or more versions of specifications has participated within F1, Indy and Le Mans.

 

henri


Edited by Henri Greuter, 04 October 2016 - 12:29.


#10 Henri Greuter

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 12:36

A friend of mine pointed this out to me:

 

This year at Indy: Juan Pablo Montoya was the driver at Indy with the lowest car number entered and in the race: #2. He was the first retirement, thus classified last.

Allesandro Rossi was the driver with the highest car number entered and in the race: #98. He won the race.

 

In 100 years at Indy this has been the only ever occasion that the highest number entered and raced won with the loweste entered and race number classified last.

 

 

 

One I had worked out myself right after the race, still sitting in the grandstands

 

2011 was the 100th anniversary of the 500: the winning car owner was Bryan Herta with car #98 who won thanks to a gamble with the fuel and letting his driver stay out.

2016 was the 100th 500 mile race: the winning car owner, (Co- if you want) was Bryan Herta with car #98 who won thanks to a gamble with the fuel and letting his driver stay out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henri



#11 Jackmancer

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 12:48

The 1907 Peking to Paris race took two months.



#12 Radoye

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 14:32

The 1972 Bandama Rally had no finishers.



#13 Bleu

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 17:09

While not really a stat, 

Marco Campos was the last driver racing on the track on the last lap of the last race of the season when he had his fatal accident.



#14 SpaceHorseParty

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 17:13

While not really a stat, 

Marco Campos was the last driver racing on the track on the last lap of the last race of the season when he had his fatal accident.

Six more drivers behind him were classified. Was he the last not to be lapped?



#15 Bleu

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 17:40

Six more drivers behind him were classified. Was he the last not to be lapped?

Exactly that was the case.



#16 f1paul

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 18:35

The closest finish in the Nascar Sprint Cup Series it this

 

 

Bit of a stupid question but was it 0.001 seconds between the top 2 or 0.002 seconds. Either way it's crazy the time between the 2 cars! That's over one hundredth of the time it takes to blink! :stoned:  



#17 SenorSjon

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 18:47

I think the Andretti family is the longest racing family? You als had the Petty's, but I don't see that name around.

#18 HistoryFan

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 16:41

Has anybody an overview about IndyCar/Cart/USAC/Champcar/AAA seasons and how many drivers of each year were 40+ and 50+?

I think we have now a lot of drivers about 40+ there...



#19 Collombin

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 18:37

Clearly the era to focus on in that regard is the early 90s, when many of the stars from the 60s were still around - Foyt, Andretti, Big Al, Lone Star JR, Johncock etc.

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#20 HistoryFan

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 10:44

This year there will be 6 different engine suppliers at the Macau Grand Prix: Mercedes, VW, Toyota, NBE, Toda and Tomei

That is record, isnt't it?



#21 Amphicar

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 11:01

I think the Andretti family is the longest racing family? You als had the Petty's, but I don't see that name around.

Nice try - but I think the Unsers have them beaten handily - have a look at this for a racing family tree: http://www.unserraci...ily-history.php



#22 HistoryFan

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 11:15

This year there will be 6 different engine suppliers at the Macau Grand Prix: Mercedes, VW, Toyota, NBE, Toda and Tomei

That is record, isnt't it?

2004 we had also 6

 

Opel Spiess

Toyota TOM's

Mugen-Honda

Mercedes-HWA

Renault Sodemo

Tomei-Nissan



#23 HistoryFan

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 11:19

1997 as well: Mugen-Honda, Opel, Toyota, Renault, Fiatm, Mitsubishi



#24 HistoryFan

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 11:22

the same 1992: Mugen-Honda, Opel, Vauxhall, VW, Alfa Romeo, Toyota



#25 f1paul

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 15:42

This year there will be 6 different engine suppliers at the Macau Grand Prix: Mercedes, VW, Toyota, NBE, Toda and Tomei

That is record, isnt't it?

Joint record

edit:Just seen your posts below, you already knew this 


Edited by f1paul, 07 October 2016 - 15:42.


#26 f1paul

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 18:24

The fastest ever speed in an Indy Car is 241.28MPH! Set by Gil De Ferran at Fontana in 2000.

 


Edited by f1paul, 07 October 2016 - 19:02.


#27 ensign14

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 18:40

The late Junie Donlavey averaged 1 win every 863 races as a NASCAR car owner.



#28 PayasYouRace

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 18:53

The fastest ever speed in an Indy Car is 241.28MPH! Set by Gil De Ferran at Fontana in 2000.


Not just in an Indycar, in any car round a circuit.

#29 EightGear

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 18:57

Not just in an Indycar, in any car round a circuit.

 

Didn't they reach 400 km/h on Le Mans on Hunaudieres? 


Edited by EightGear, 07 October 2016 - 18:57.


#30 f1paul

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 19:01

Didn't they reach 400 km/h on Le Mans on Hunaudieres? 

Yes

 

"At the beginning of the 1988 24 Hours of Le Mans race, Roger Dorchy driving for Welter Racing in a "Project 400" car, which sacrificed reliability for speed, was clocked by radar travelling at 405 kilometres per hour (252 mph))."



#31 PayasYouRace

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 19:09

Didn't they reach 400 km/h on Le Mans on Hunaudieres?


De Ferran's 241.28 was the average speed, not the top speed.

#32 ensign14

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 19:56

Tom Sneva, Tony Bettenhausen and Ted Horn all won Champcar titles without winning a race.

 

Stirling Moss never took part in the Indy 500.  But his dad did.



#33 john winfield

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 20:17

Between 1964 and 1970 Jochen Rindt won 29 Formula 2 races, often beating the best grand prix drivers of the time.



#34 Collombin

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 20:23

Tom Sneva, Tony Bettenhausen and Ted Horn all won Champcar titles without winning a race


Depends what you mean by Champcar title, I would say Horn did win races in his 1946 AAA national championship as it's now generally accepted it was a 77 race season rather than 6.

#35 EightGear

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 20:29

De Ferran's 241.28 was the average speed, not the top speed.


Ah, of course.

Still though, I don't think the top speed from Le Mans has ever been topped?

#36 NewMrMe

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 23:48

In the 1999 Indy Lights season neither champion Oriol Servia or runner up Casey Mears won a race.



#37 Collombin

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 07:16

In the 1999 Indy Lights season neither champion Oriol Servia or runner up Casey Mears won a race.


Likewise the 1958 national championship, Tony Bettenhausen and George Amick.

#38 Amphicar

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 10:24

The fastest ever speed in an Indy Car is 241.28MPH! Set by Gil De Ferran at Fontana in 2000.

 

 

 

Not just in an Indycar, in any car round a circuit.

Not so PayasYouRace - the closed course (circuit) record of 257.123 mph (413.788 km/h) was set by AJ Foyt on on 27 August 1987 at the 7.712-mile (12.411 km) test track near Fort Stockton Texas.

 

The Oldsmobile Aerotech that AJ used to set the record was based on the March 84C chassis that had won that year's Indy 500 - so you could argue that it was the fastest Indycar too!

 

1987_Oldsmobile_Aerotech_Concept_Aj_Foyt


Edited by Amphicar, 08 October 2016 - 11:24.


#39 Collombin

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 10:32

The closed circuit speed record evolution is something that really interests me, but I've never really taken too much trouble to research. In best HistoryFan tradition does anyone have a list (separating records set in competitive events rather than speed trials if poss)?

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#40 ensign14

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 10:44

Raul Riganti only showed up at Indianapolis for the 500 three times.  Qualified every time.

 

Not in itself crazy, but he managed to do so in three different decades.

 

Roberto Moreno's three 500 starts were also in three decades, but he had a DNQ betwixt the first brace.



#41 NewMrMe

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 19:20

Raul Riganti only showed up at Indianapolis for the 500 three times.  Qualified every time.

 

Not in itself crazy, but he managed to do so in three different decades.

 

Roberto Moreno's three 500 starts were also in three decades, but he had a DNQ betwixt the first brace.

 

Moreno is a walking crazy stat factory.

 

- Took his first CART/Champ Car win (Cleveland 2000) 15 years after his first race (Meadowlands 1985).

- In that first season of CART in 1985 he only competed in 5 races but never qualified lower than 7th. His best result though was 5th.

- I know this is non-F1 thread but he first failed to qualify for a GP more than 5 years before he raced in one.



#42 NewMrMe

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 19:22

In the 2015 GP3 series Esteban Ocon had 9 consecutive second place finshes. Are there any other long streaks of a driver finishing in the same position that is not first?



#43 ensign14

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 08:38

There are two examples of careers starting before World War 1 and finishing after World War 2.  One driver, and one car.

 

The driver is the Hon. Francis Samuelson, whose early racing career was in cyclecars; a sort of Formula 3 of the pre-WW1 era, and in a Sizaire-Naudin voiturette which he raced at Brooklands in 1909. 

 

He took part in the 1913 Cyclecar Grand Prix at Amiens while on honeymoon.  His riding mechanic for the race was the new Mrs S.  She was actually too petite for the weight limit, so had to carry a 5 lb petrol can.  (She was not put off by the experience; in 1929 she was his co-driver in the Monte Carlo Rally).  Spent the inter-war period mostly in sportscars (a few appearances au Mans) and finished up his career in the 500cc Formula 3 of the 1940s and 50s. 

 

By the time he had his last 500cc race he had turned 60; and after he gave up on "formula" racing he continued in historics until his eighties.

 

The car is a 1913 model Peugeot L45 that won the Indy 500 in 1916 under the original British Dario Indy Winner - Dario Resta.    It ended up in the hands of legendary car collector, and early proponent of historic racing in the US, Lindley Bothwell.  In 1949, he decided basically to see if he could set a new speed record for the marque, and entered it for the Indy 500.  He managed it with a lap of 103mph; nearly 20mph faster than Dario's average speed, 10mph than his qualifying speed and 3mph faster than the Speedway's home-made Premier copycats in 1919 (basically at a time of a dearth of chassis, Indianapolis built up some cars to boost the field).  Such were the improvements available over the years - better brakes, wider tyres and so on.

 

He was 20mph off from making the race though.  Short of a Chet Fillip run of luck he was never going to qualify.



#44 Collombin

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 11:57

I think the track surface improvements deserve a fair share of the credit too.

#45 f1paul

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 15:05

In the 2015 GP3 series Esteban Ocon had 9 consecutive second place finshes. Are there any other long streaks of a driver finishing in the same position that is not first?

Just a guess but possibly in something like NASCAR there is, but I'm just guessing



#46 Dan333SP

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 15:26

De Ferran's 241.28 was the average speed, not the top speed.

 

I read somewhere at some point that they were actually topping 250mph, maybe approaching 260 in the draft during practice for that race and at Michigan. Absolutely insane.

 

I've also read that the highest speeds ever at Indy were in the 248mph range in the mid 1990s, before the IRL split obviously.

 

One Le Mans-related statistic that I find a bit crazy... Ferrari has not won the race overall since 1965.

 

Yes, they've won multiple GT classes and even won the LMP class in '98 (my avatar!), but they haven't made a serious works effort for the win since the mid 70s with the 312PB.


Edited by Dan333SP, 13 October 2016 - 15:26.


#47 f1paul

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 17:47

Since the start of the World Endurance Championship in 2012, nobody has defended their title and nobody has won it more than once.



#48 Hati

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 20:17

Markku Alen had twice most championship points in WRC at the end of the season but he has no championchips. The well known occurence happened in '86 when he was a champion for eleven days before FIA disqualified the results of San Remo. Other time he had most points was in '78, he didn't get WDC that year because they awarded first title at '79. (He got FIA cup for drivers title instead.)

https://en.wikipedia...iki/Markku_Alén



#49 sjakie

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 09:50

Morgan Shepherd is the oldest driver in NASCAR and probably the world: 75 now (and counting) and still competing in NASCAR Nationwide and Truck series



#50 Andretti Fan

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 16:01

The Pilette's go back a long long way!