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Barclay & Skoal Bandit


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#1 fareleiro

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 22:04

During the 1984 and 1985 seasons, Arrows was sponsored by Barclay Tobacco and RAM by Skoal Bandit chewing Tobacco.

 

British and German goverment prohibited tobacco sponsorship.

So, in these 2 races, Mclaren, Ligier and Lotus had to erase their Marlboro, Gitanes and JPS sponsor logos from their cars.

Why didn't Arrows and RAM did it?

What was the difference?

 



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#2 Tim Murray

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 23:24

My understanding is that in that period there was no official ban on tobacco advertising in either Germany or the UK. However, the teams had a voluntary agreement with the TV companies covering the British and German GPs that their tobacco decals would be covered or removed when the races were being televised. As practice sessions were then generally not televised, the tobacco decals would be there during practice - here’s Lauda at Silverstone in 1985:

mclalaud-silv-1985.jpg

but removed for the race proper - here’s Boutsen during the Grand Prix itself:

6477530461_8bc4004686_b.jpg

#3 fareleiro

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:56

Maybe you're right.

 

I read some posts on Tobacco advertisement on UK and it was only prohibited in Sporting events in the 2000´s.

So maybe it was a gentlemam agreement.

 

It was a bit strange to see pics of the Mclarens in Silverstone and Brands Hatch with and without the Marlboro ads.

 

Thanks!



#4 BRG

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 18:25

Not sure that chewing tobacco was covered by any ban in the UK since that is a vice in which the British simply don't participate.  Or even know about.  Skoal Bandit?  Isn't that some sort of pick-up truck?



#5 Michael Ferner

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 19:52

No ban on advertising in Germany, just a voluntary waiver by the tobacco companies - in fact, this waiver was agreed upon by all companies to deflect a possible/likely ban by the legislature! However, products that were not merchandized in Germany were exempt from this restraint, and I'm not sure Skoal Bandit was ever on sale here. Like BRG for Britain, I don't think there is a market at all for chewing tobacco in Germany, at least I have never ever noticed anybody using the product. As for Barclays, I'm not sure it was on sale at the time, but it definitely was at some point, as I recall it had a "trick" filter arrangement - ddn't last very long, though. In Germany, the tobacco ads had to be covered on practice days, too.

#6 Vitesse2

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 20:11

Not sure that chewing tobacco was covered by any ban in the UK since that is a vice in which the British simply don't participate.  Or even know about.  Skoal Bandit?  Isn't that some sort of pick-up truck?

They were sold here briefly in the mid-80s - main target market was students, apparently. The EU first raised the idea of a ban in 1987: Ireland banned them the following year, followed by the UK and Belgium in 1990. EU-wide ban in 1992.

 

https://www.tobaccot...n_on_Snus_Sales

 

In the UK there was more of a market for snuff, especially in mining areas, due to the fact that you couldn't smoke down t'pit. When I ran convenience stores I had a few elderly ex-miners as customers for snuff. Probably all snuffed it now ...



#7 bradbury west

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 11:31

Snuff always kept the nostrils etc clear, useful in a very dusty environment, and stimulated saliva. Similarly chewing tobacco did the same, again useful for those in the dusty outdoors too.
I heard after it was banned that chewing stuff like Skoal was believed/found to accelerate various types of oral and throat cancers.
Roger Lund

Edited by bradbury west, 17 May 2019 - 11:36.


#8 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 14:18

Barclay was (at least in the first years) marketed as a low tar cigarette, claiming to be near healthy. It also had a special filter. 

I remember visiting the German GP when tobacco was not branded on the cars, sponsors offered you cigarettes between parking areas and grand stands.....



#9 Michael Ferner

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 08:57

That was pretty common at rock concerts, too.

#10 Glengavel

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 10:26

Skoal Bandits weren't 'chewing' tobacco as such, more like little teabags that were sucked rather than chewed.

Thirty-odd years ago Skoal Bandit caused a furore by opening a factory (or possibly just a distribution centre) in East Kilbride, with funding from the Scottish Office - the Scottish Industry Minister at that time was Allan Stewart, a supporter of pro-tobacco pressure group FOREST.
US Tobacco spent £120,000 lobbying to promote Skoal. Ultimately, the product was banned a few years later.

#11 bike13

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 15:53

Skoal Bandits weren't 'chewing' tobacco as such, more like little teabags that were sucked rather than chewed.

Thirty-odd years ago Skoal Bandit caused a furore by opening a factory (or possibly just a distribution centre) in East Kilbride, with funding from the Scottish Office - the Scottish Industry Minister at that time was Allan Stewart, a supporter of pro-tobacco pressure group FOREST.
US Tobacco spent £120,000 lobbying to promote Skoal. Ultimately, the product was banned a few years later.

 

What types of laws now exist for vaping companies?  What might happen to the advertising market when/if marijuana becomes legalized in countries that host races?