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The progress in road engines keeps impressing me


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#1 mariner

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 15:58

Now , a 310 bhp 4 cylinder Truck engine.

 

https://www.enginela...-to-race-horse/

 

Interestingly  its a 2.7 litre not the usual 2 litre 4 but over 300 bhp is stll impressive given an SUV/pick up truck engine needs durability and they have to allow for less than perfect maintainence  as well .

 

This video has some silly bits but it has a lot on the 3 phase cam timing set up

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=HYzWoAJYFe4



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#2 Fat Boy

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 16:17

Ford's 2.3L puts out 330 HP in one form, and, a couple years ago in that hot-rod Focus, it was 350. All with reasonable economy when cruising. It is impressive what they're doing on production cars. 10 years ago this was strictly V8 territory.



#3 gruntguru

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 22:35

The Mercedes A45 AMG is the daddy. 410 hp from 2 litres.

 

I enjoyed the video - even the silly bits. (although I must admit I did a lot of skipping) What is silly is the fuel efficiency - even GM claims worse highway economy than the V8???? They really need to get water injection into these highly boosted engines instead of over-fuelling them to control detonation and thermal stress.

 

I also liked the use of mm to describe the clearances in the turbocharger..



#4 Wuzak

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 05:26

The Mercedes A45 AMG is the daddy. 410 hp from 2 litres.

 

I enjoyed the video - even the silly bits. (although I must admit I did a lot of skipping) What is silly is the fuel efficiency - even GM claims worse highway economy than the V8???? They really need to get water injection into these highly boosted engines instead of over-fuelling them to control detonation and thermal stress.

 

I also liked the use of mm to describe the clearances in the turbocharger..

 

29mpg on the highway for the Caddy isn't that great either?



#5 Bob Riebe

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 19:16

Ah the wonderful world of 4 bangers, especially in front wheel drive.

Now engine packaging has become asinine whether fwd or rwd,  my cousin has to spend over 100 bucks to have new spark plugs put in his Equinox but his vunnerful, vunnerful , as Lawrence Welk used to say, 4 banger had to have new cylinders put in just a couple thou before warranty went out and NOW his tranny went  ou, no warranty.

At the Chevy garage, they told him to rebuild it a little over 5 grand; a rebuilt would be 4,700, so he put in a rebuilt.

His gas mileage has now gone up by 8 mpg, although he had to put in a new sensor also, but let's see, 8 mpg,  averaging 2 dollars a gallon, goes into 4,700 dollars....

He was going to trade it in for new Equinox but now with this and other items fixed not under warranty, it would be a major loss so he will probably drive it till it stops running.

I have stated this before but the 4 banger car he had before this, he had to put an entire rebuilt engine in.

At least the rebuilds come with a three year warranty, unlike the cylinders put in under warranty, not quite as bad as you warranty end at the drive-way , but not a lot better.



#6 Greg Locock

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Posted 16 June 2020 - 23:25

Hi $100 spark plugs probably lasted for 100000 miles, rather better than the good old days.



#7 Bob Riebe

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 03:06

Hi $100 spark plugs probably lasted for 100000 miles, rather better than the good old days.

He supplied the E3 plugs, that was just the install charge at a Chevy dealer.



#8 Fat Boy

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 17:48

He supplied the E3 plugs, that was just the install charge at a Chevy dealer.

That's hardly the fault of the engine.



#9 Bob Riebe

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 17:53

That's hardly the fault of the engine.

It is the fault of the auto designers who do no to work on these things.

My independent mechanic often tells them to take it to the dealer due to the amount of work needed just to get to a problem, he would be no cheaper.



#10 gruntguru

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 22:43

The auto designers (where's Greg?) certainly have to account for serviceability of the finished product. If the spark plugs last for 100,000 miles, the designer will have more leeway regarding spark-plug-accessibility of his design.



#11 Canuck

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 14:18

They're designed fine for dealerships, just not the home mechanic.  Changing the cylinder head on my father's 04 F150 after it had the dreaded spark plug and thread failure, step one was disconnect the battery, step 2, in the manual, was remove body from frame. That sounds completely ridiculous but doesn't actually take that much time, and it's infinitely simpler to work on with the entire body out of the way.  Access galore. Too bad I don't have that kind of garage.



#12 Greg Locock

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 21:26

Total cost of ownership, including servicing costs, is tracked during a program, and lease fleets in particular pay a great deal of attention to them. But by buying the plugs and then asking a mechanic to install them the rate for the job would be high, as the profit on parts is a significant part of the business model, and of course fiddle arsing around with a car just to do a small job has a high setup cost, he probably spent 10 minutes doing paperwork and moving cars around the service bay.

 

Having said all that, if a typical lease car wouldn't need its plugs changing (and I bet they don't) then the cost would not be tracked or at least would be heavily discounted, in TCO. Repair costs are also tracked for insurance but again sparkplugs aren't really part of that.



#13 Bob Riebe

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 22:05

Well I think, he put them in not long before the cylinders were shot; had he waited a bit they could have put them in for free when they redid the engine.

He gets breaks on the car when he takes it in as he has had it in OFTEN.

It is a 2013  and is what I calla jinxed car.

At that he bought a used 1993 Corvette and when I ragged him for not checking it over before he bought he got pissy,

He is cheap and rather than spend a larger amount to fix it, and all his car right the first time goes the cheap route and it has burnt him greatly.

Not including purchase price of the Corvette, he has spent enough money on both cars the past seven years he could have bought the Corvette a second time.