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#1 D28

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 00:05

We always set up on the hill at Corner 5 where one could view, the exit from tricky Corner 4 (where Gurney said he didn't need to brake) into the chute for 5 A and B, and up backstretch to the top of the hill. At a certain spot about 1/3 mile of track was visible, some very technical sections. If he were brave enough, a driver could get inside at Corner 5 and be on the right line to power up the hill. Surtees below is doing this to Chuck Parsons. 1969 Can-AmSimoniz.jpg Bruce's last run here in big sports cars  kept up his winning ways, 1969 Can-Am

Bruce2.jpgLocal boy George Eaton always a crowd favourite

George.jpg...

!969 Canadian GP Rindt leads Ickx up the hill

Ickxrindt.jpgFerrari gave up after the European season in 69, and loaned the 312 to Chinetti for Pedro Rodrigeuz, seen here at the Canadian GPPedro2.jpg 1971 Can GP Seppi again in the BRM. Sadly this was his last visit to Canada.

yardley.jpg

1972 Can GP Ronnie has the March headed in a straight line at this pointRonnie.jpg


Edited by D28, 22 June 2020 - 00:23.


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#2 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 01:58

Great shots D28! Thanks for starting this thread. I'm sure there will be a lot of photos uploaded here. Here are some of mine from the 1971 Grand Prix.

 

Mario Andretti

 

Andrettti.png

 

George Eaton

 

Eaton.png

 

Graham Hill

 

Hill.png

 

Jacky Ickx

 

Ickx.png

 

A Lotus 72. Emerson Fittipaldi drove #2 and Reine Wisell drove #3 not sure which one this is.

 

Lotus-72.png

 

Pete Lovely in his hybrid Lotus, a 49 rear end grafted onto the back of a 69 with a full-width front wing in place of the standard nose with canards either side.

 

Lovely.png

 

Helmut Marko

 

Marko.png

 

Jo Siffert

 

Siffert.png



#3 dbltop

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 04:33

I wish race day in 71 had been as sunny, we were only there on Sunday.



#4 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 23 June 2020 - 01:32

Yes, Sunday was a terrible day for a number of reasons.


Edited by R.W. Mackenzie, 23 June 2020 - 01:33.


#5 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 15:09

It was a dreary day to begin with but then there was a fatal accident in the Formula Ford support race. As the driver, Wayne Kelly, was obviously dead at the scene, racing had to be shut down and the coroner called in. It took hours before the track was cleared to resume racing. By then worse weather had rolled in in the form of rain and poor visibility. I don't recall if the race was further delayed by the weather but it was late in the afternoon before the grid began to form up for the start of the Grand Prix.

 

I took this shot as the drivers' parade was getting under way and the cars were being brought out of the paddock. Wasn't much of a parade as the convertibles all had to have their roofs up which only added to the gloom of the day.

 

1971-GP-12.jpg

 

The race was fairly interesting as Ronnie Peterson battled Jackie Stewart for the lead. This went on until they came up to lap George Eaton. Ronnie tagged George's BRM lightly but enough to skew his tea-tray front wing (on the short section between turns 9 and 10, right in front of us). Ronnie fell beck after that and by the time the race was flagged after 64 laps Jackie had a 38 second lead. Fog had set in and the corner workers could no longer see from station to station. I don't think anyone, even the spectators, was sorry it ended early. We were all cold and damp and just wanted to find some warmth.



#6 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 15:31

On a lighter note, here is my entry for the Worst Racing Photograph Ever Taken contest should that competition ever be held:

 

1971-GP-04.jpg

 

It's not even a good picture of a chain-link fence. Can you identify the three cars sort of in the picture? I can't!



#7 Tim Murray

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 15:59

I reckon the leading car is a Lotus 72 - its wedge shape and the distinctive front brake cooling ducts can be seen. The car behind looks a bit Tyrrellish to me - nose, airbox shape etc.

So I’ll plump for Reine Wisell leading François Cevert - they did spend a large part of the race in fairly close company. No real idea about the third car - Hulme or Amon, perhaps?

#8 E1pix

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 16:27

Second car looks like a March to me.

On edited thought, Tim may be right it’s a Tyrrell. I’ve only looked on my phone so far.

Edited by E1pix, 24 June 2020 - 16:29.


#9 D28

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 16:40

I reckon the leading car is a Lotus 72 - its wedge shape and the distinctive front brake cooling ducts can be seen. The car behind looks a bit Tyrrellish to me - nose, airbox shape etc.

So I’ll plump for Reine Wisell leading François Cevert - they did spend a large part of the race in fairly close company. No real idea about the third car - Hulme or Amon, perhaps?

Yes that is a likely scenario. My biggest disappointment was 2 wet weather specialists and my faourites had a real shot at winning. But Peterson and Seppi had a disagreement over space in corner 2 at the start and Seppi ended up off track in an agricultural excursion. He came round lap 1, not in the expected lead, but in 17th place with the nose battered in and mud covered. And that was it, he pitted to clean up the mud and ran well, but his race was over; after he started on row 1 beside Stewart. And Ronnie led for 13 laps or more and but for the brush with Eaton could have prevailed, though Stewart was always tidier, if less exciting to watch. No one felt cheated over the missing 16 laps, everyone was thoroughly drenched. Stewart commented even he didn't particularly enjoy the win, was just glad it was over.


Edited by D28, 24 June 2020 - 16:41.


#10 Dave Ware

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 20:51

On a lighter note, here is my entry for the Worst Racing Photograph Ever Taken contest should that competition ever be held:

 

1971-GP-04.jpg

 

It's not even a good picture of a chain-link fence. Can you identify the three cars sort of in the picture? I can't!

If you disregard the fence, then I've certainly taken worse photos. 

 

Must have been a disappointment to get your photos back in the mail and see this one.   Although we're enjoying it now!

 

My first thought was Lotus, March, Matra.  But since this was '71 the middle car would be something else.  A Tyrrell makes sense. 



#11 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 21:04

I took a look at the excellent 8 mm footage my Dad took. We were standing in close proximity but he somehow managed to not let the spectator fence get in the way. (Go figure! :rotfl: ) There is a sequence where Fittipaldi in his Lotus 72 is very closely followed by Peterson's March 711. There is a third car in the background but it disappears before showing enough to identify it.

 

I blew up my picture as much as I could and I'm guessing it's Tim Schenken in his Brabham BT33 which had a sports car nose in 1971. It's a dark coloured car and has a light  coloured rear wing. Only the Brabhams and Surtees fit that description. But the nose is dark with some light highlights. The nose of the Surtees was white for the full width which leaves only the Brabhams. Hill in his BT34 is shown circulating by himself in the film clip and his cockpit surround was yellow, the same colour as his the Brabhams' rear wing, and that doesn't match the car in the picture. So that only leaves Schenken.

 

Here is a still from the 8 mm movie. It's the frame that best shows the third car.

 

Sequence-01-Moment.jpg

 

This still shows Schenken later in the day at Moss Corner.

 

Sequence-01-Moment2.jpg

 

This isn't 100% certain but it's my best guess.



#12 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 21:19

If you disregard the fence, then I've certainly taken worse photos. 

 

Must have been a disappointment to get your photos back in the mail and see this one.   Although we're enjoying it now!

 

My first thought was Lotus, March, Matra.  But since this was '71 the middle car would be something else.  A Tyrrell makes sense. 


It was definitely a disappointment. That shot, along with two pictures below, finally drove home the sad reality that the Kodak Instamatic 104 was not the proper tool for photographing cars at speed. In future it was only used for close-ups.

 

A Tyrrell that I've always assumed was Stewart and another barely distinguishable car. Oh yes, and the the famous chain-link fence.

 

1971-GP-02.jpg

 

Pretty sure this is Denny Hulme. The only other McLaren was Donohue's in Penske blue. But strangely no fence!

 

1971-GP-03.jpg



#13 D28

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 22:41

I took a look at the excellent 8 mm footage my Dad took. We were standing in close proximity but he somehow managed to not let the spectator fence get in the way. (Go figure! :rotfl: ) There is a sequence where Fittipaldi in his Lotus 72 is very closely followed by Peterson's March 711. There is a third car in the background but it disappears before showing enough to identify it.

 

I blew up my picture as much as I could and I'm guessing it's Tim Schenken in his Brabham BT33 which had a sports car nose in 1971. It's a dark coloured car and has a light  coloured rear wing. Only the Brabhams and Surtees fit that description. But the nose is dark with some light highlights. The nose of the Surtees was white for the full width which leaves only the Brabhams. Hill in his BT34 is shown circulating by himself the film clip and his cockpit surround was yellow, the same colour as his the Brabhams' rear wing, and that doesn't match the car in the picture. So that only leaves Schenken.

 

Here is a still from the 8 mm movie. It's the frame that best shows the third car.

 

 

 

This still shows Schenken later in the day at Moss Corner.

 

 

 

This isn't 100% certain but it's my best guess.

Schenken is problematic as the lap chart from Autocourse and their results show #8 Schenken completing only lap 1 and retiring with ignition faults. Still the picture at Moss is him alright, so go figure.  Peterson lapped Fittipaldi right near the end, lap 62 and close behind on the road at the time was Ickx. Could it be him?  the finishing order was Fittipaldi, Ickx and Siffert, but Siffert was a white car so not him. Have a close look if the car is maybe red. 

Otherwise from 50 years on I can't help you!



#14 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 01:17

Hi D28,

 

My crappy pictures and my Dad's 8 mm film shot at Turn 10 were taken either Friday or Saturday as soon as we arrived at the track. Sad to say I don't remember when we arrived. I know for sure that we arrived for the 1970 Can-Am on the Saturday but I don't recall with certainty if we arrived on the Friday for the 1971 Grand Prix. But I think so. And the shot of Schenken at Moss Corner was taken no later than the Saturday afternoon. All of our race day photos and movies were taken from the pit straight grandstand,



#15 PCC

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 03:11

It was a dreary day to begin with but then there was a fatal accident in the Formula Ford support race. As the driver, Wayne Kelly, was obviously dead at the scene, racing had to be shut down and the coroner called in. It took hours before the track was cleared to resume racing. By then worse weather had rolled in in the form of rain and poor visibility. I don't recall if the race was further delayed by the weather but it was late in the afternoon before the grid began to form up for the start of the Grand Prix.

 

I took this shot as the drivers' parade was getting under way and the cars were being brought out of the paddock. Wasn't much of a parade as the convertibles all had to have their roofs up which only added to the gloom of the day.

 

1971-GP-12.jpg

 

The race was fairly interesting as Ronnie Peterson battled Jackie Stewart for the lead. This went on until they came up to lap George Eaton. Ronnie tagged George's BRM lightly but enough to skew his tea-tray front wing (on the short section between turns 9 and 10, right in front of us). Ronnie fell beck after that and by the time the race was flagged after 64 laps Jackie had a 38 second lead. Fog had set in and the corner workers could no longer see from station to station. I don't think anyone, even the spectators, was sorry it ended early. We were all cold and damp and just wanted to find some warmth.

I remember JYS coming up to the announcing booth after the win for an interview. I don't remember what my dad's first question to him was, but instead of answering it immediately Jackie said he wanted to express his condolences to everyone who knew the FF driver who had been killed, and what a tragedy it was. As it happens, Wayne Kelly was a friend of my dad's, and this classy gesture - which I've never forgotten - meant a lot.



#16 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 14:57

Hi PCC,

 

I don't recall the interview (we were probably making our way back to the warmth of our trailer at the time) but I can imagine Jackie saying that. He has always been a class act. By the way, was your father Jim Paulson? 



#17 PCC

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 15:42

Hi PCC,

 

I don't recall the interview (we were probably making our way back to the warmth of our trailer at the time) but I can imagine Jackie saying that. He has always been a class act. By the way, was your father Jim Paulson? 

No, Jim (if I remember correctly) was always at Corner 5. My dad  (Bill Coffman) was in the tower. Except for the GP in '74, when we were at corner 3 (Niki slid off right in front of us).

 

Edited to add a thought about JYS: For some reason, it seems to have become not just okay but downright fashionable to diss Jackie. One commenter on the Motor Sport site called him a "good but not great driver." They were obviously not there at the time. The man I saw was not only a great driver, but a good person.


Edited by PCC, 25 June 2020 - 15:53.


#18 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 16:28

Sorry, it was a dumb question. I didn't notice your name at the bottom of your post 'til after I posted it. I'm going to take a wild stab and guess that PCC doesn't stand for Porsche Car Collector.

 

I've never understood why people would treat Jackie with less than the respect he truly deserves. I found him a little grating when he did race commentary for ABC all those years ago. But he has always been an honourable and sincere person. And think of what he has achieved in spite of his dyslexia. I attended a presentation and book signing a few years ago in Toronto and was impressed by his poise, friendliness and humility but stunned by the limitations the condition imposed.



#19 E1pix

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 16:59

Nothing to contribute beyond "I love this thread."



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#20 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 21:39

Here are some pictures I took at the 1972 Can-Am:

Rainer Brezinka drove this Porsche 910 in practice but did not start the race.

 

1972-Can-Am-01.jpg

Lothar Motschenbacher's McLaren M8D. Lothar qualified 7th and finished 6th, 4 laps down.

 

1972-Can-Am-02.jpg

Charlie Kemp's Lola T222. Charlie qualified 11th and finished 9th, 6 laps down.

 

1972-Can-Am-03.jpg

Denny Hulme. Denny qualified 3rd and won the race. I'm pretty sure that's Teddy Mayer with his back to the camera.

 

1972-Can-Am-04.jpg

Denny again.

 

1972-Can-Am-05.jpg

Peter Revson. Peter qualified second and finished third although he wasn't running at the end due to a broken crankshaft in the final laps.

 

1972-Can-Am-06.jpg

Peter Gregg's Brumos Porsche 917/10. Peter qualified 8th and finished 5th.

 

1972-Can-Am-07.jpg

While wandering through the paddock I came across a McLaren M8F rolling chassis on an open trailer. As it was that year's customer McLaren and it was in pristine shape (white and completely unmarked) I've always assumed it was being delivered to it's new owner although I never knew who that might be. Wish I had thought to record the chassis number. Anyway I decided to take a picture from the driver's perspective and so I reached in with my camera and snapped this pic. Considering I couldn't look through the viewfinder it turned out pretty well.

 

1972-Can-Am-08.jpg

Forty years later in 2012 at a big vintage event at Lime Rock I came across a gorgeous black M8F and decided to try and recreate the above shot. This time it took three tries to get right but here it is.

 

187.jpg

Milt Minter's Vasek Polak Porsche 917/10. Milt qualified 5th and finished 4th, 2 laps down.

 

1972-Can-Am-10.jpg

Mark Donohue's Penske Porsche 917/10 TC. Mark qualified on the pole and led from the start but finished 2nd after a long stop to fix a stuck turbo. This is my favourite of the pictures I took with my Instamatic. Because of the crowd around the car I had to hold the camera above the people in front of me and so again could not look through the viewfinder. So I was very pleased with how it turned out.

 

1972-Can-Am-11.jpg

Lothar Motschenbacher. He doesn't look much happier here than he did when I encountered him on the back straight in 1970 loading his somewhat bent M8B onto the trailer.

 

1972-Can-Am-12.jpg



#21 10kDA

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 22:15

 

 

Edited to add a thought about JYS: For some reason, it seems to have become not just okay but downright fashionable to diss Jackie. One commenter on the Motor Sport site called him a "good but not great driver." They were obviously not there at the time. The man I saw was not only a great driver, but a good person.

"Good but not great" - ? Holy cr*p. I guess everybody he raced against was fair to middlin' then.



#22 D28

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 23:54

R W: those are excellent shots of the 72 Can-Am, brings back a lot of memories. I recall the 1st lap practice lap of Donohue's 917/10. I forget if we were forewarned, probably, just not expecting anything quite so dramatic. Oddly enough it was Peter Revson rather than Donohue who set fastest lap 115.2, though Donohue went quicker in practice.. This survived the F1 cars in Sept when Stewart did 115.7 and even the 1973 Can-Am when Donohue did 118 in the 917/30.  Since 1973 F1 race was the wet mixup, I think that record held up till June 74 when George Folmer did 114.6 in the Shadow Can-Am. Mosport was one circuit where the Can-Am cars generally held the lap record. And these FL times listed in the Mosport programs were set in the race.

Anyway great stuff, thanks for posting them.



#23 D28

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 16:29

Chris Amon Ferrari 612 1969 Glen Can-Am

 

Chris.jpg

 

 

Amon missed the first 2 Canadian rounds but appeared with the 612 for the Glen race. With this car, hearing was believing, as the 6.2 l engine, largest so far from Ferrari, produced an unholy basso wail at full song, easily the most distinctive Can-Am sound ever. Without the large wing, this version of the 612 was the most attractive of the Ferrari Can-Am cars.

This car coulda been a contender, given even minimal factory support. But with a 69 program, of F1. F2, Sports Cars, Tasman and a special European Hill Climb car, Amon was left on his own with a small team and predictable results. Even so, he wasn't far off the pace and managed 2nd at Edmonton, but his overall effort was doomed due to lack of factory commitment. Even in big displacement development, the 512 S had priority at Maranello.

Jim Adams had this car at Mosport for the 71 Can-Am, but with the smaller 512 engine, so he was unable to run with the leaders.

 

The Ferrari 612 and 712 experience simply showed nothing short of expensive development and a full time professional approach would be successful at the Can-Am. Porsche and Penske dully took note.


Edited by D28, 28 June 2020 - 16:35.


#24 Sterzo

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 10:00

It was definitely a disappointment. That shot, along with two pictures below, finally drove home the sad reality that the Kodak Instamatic 104 was not the proper tool for photographing cars at speed. In future it was only used for close-ups.

 

A Tyrrell that I've always assumed was Stewart and another barely distinguishable car. Oh yes, and the the famous chain-link fence.

 

1971-GP-02.jpg

 

 

One man's disappointing picture is another's source of pleasure. In the seventies I spectated at Spa, Nurburgring, Clermont Ferrand, Silverstone and Brands Hatch, but didn't ever go to Mosport. Pictures like this make me feel like I did. You can't pick out the tartan on the helmet, but the atmosphere is terrific,



#25 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 16:43

I have a few more I have been meaning to post in the "Fifty Years Ago This Weekend" thread plus I have colour slides my Dad took at the 1974 and 1976 F1 races I could post. I scanned them last week but I'm not too happy with how they turned out. There was a fair bit of dust and debris that showed up from the inside of the scanning unit. I gave it a shot with some canned air and that seemed to do the trick but that was after they were all done and I had viewed the results. It may be a while because I'm going for knee surgery on Friday and I won't be able to go down the stairs to the basement where all my stuff is for a number of weeks. 



#26 E1pix

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 17:13

I’ve long had far better luck with anti-static brushes. I had a couple 1” brushes for slides and negs and one I think was 3” that I used on 4x5 film.

I tried air early on when testing the brushes, and it seemed what I mostly got from the air was dust forced against the mount and stuck there — and wasted money. If ever doing that again i’d use my little Binks airbrush compressor with a dry trap (water trap) but still prefer anti-static brushes.

On some very rough, off-projected slides from my teen years I had to unmount and do a distilled water and cotton ball cleaning which reverts film to like new — but the process is minutes per image and a bit of technique needs learning. It’s nothing short of amazing when done right, though.

I’m off-topic again but hope this helps. PM if it helps.


Edit: In the end, as hard as it is, every minute spent getting film clean is multiplied *many times over* in time saved in dusting later. Some would argue that auto-dusting software makes sloppy scanning okay, but I’ve yet to see anything beat Digital ICE from 15 years ago but even then brush-dusting the film in advance is best.

Edited by E1pix, 30 June 2020 - 17:17.


#27 D28

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 18:42

R W:

Best wishes on your hospital stay, and when you get back on your feet be sure and post more of your photo selection. Looking forward to seeing them.



#28 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 20:01

Here's one for a chuckle. I don't recall who took it but it wasn't me because I am the poor sod sitting sideways at Turn 9. This is from an Ontario Regional race at Mosport in 1982, probably the Deutscher Automobile Club event. I had qualified higher up than usual. Don't ask me how. My tires were shot and I lost it on the first lap trying to keep up with the faster cars. I'm looking back at the rest of the field bearing down on me and feeling very exposed.

 

RF75-DAC82.jpg

 

Nobody hit me and I got on my way again without incident. Don't recall where I finished but I do recall that I bought a newer used set of rears for the next race at Shannonville. In practice the fronts wouldn't stick (surprise!) and I wore them down to the cords just trying to stay on the road. Ah the joys of being young and foolish and racing with no money!



#29 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 20:17

I’ve long had far better luck with anti-static brushes. I had a couple 1” brushes for slides and negs and one I think was 3” that I used on 4x5 film.

I tried air early on when testing the brushes, and it seemed what I mostly got from the air was dust forced against the mount and stuck there — and wasted money. If ever doing that again i’d use my little Binks airbrush compressor with a dry trap (water trap) but still prefer anti-static brushes.

On some very rough, off-projected slides from my teen years I had to unmount and do a distilled water and cotton ball cleaning which reverts film to like new — but the process is minutes per image and a bit of technique needs learning. It’s nothing short of amazing when done right, though.

I’m off-topic again but hope this helps. PM if it helps.


Edit: In the end, as hard as it is, every minute spent getting film clean is multiplied *many times over* in time saved in dusting later. Some would argue that auto-dusting software makes sloppy scanning okay, but I’ve yet to see anything beat Digital ICE from 15 years ago but even then brush-dusting the film in advance is best.

Thanks for the tips E1pix. The slides have been carefully stored and running them through my slide projector after the fact showed that the problem wasn't with them. After giving the scanner a shot of air, I re-scanned one slide that had turned out badly and it was much improved. Unfortunately the scanning unit doesn't appear to be disassembleable (I think I just invented a new word!) and so canned air is my only option. I need to re-scan most of them because there are black spots and hairs (bloody cats!) that don't appear on the slides.


Edited by R.W. Mackenzie, 30 June 2020 - 20:23.


#30 E1pix

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 21:15

I suspect the detritus was on the film when scanned but since left.

 

It may be worth comparing two scanned slides... if your theory is correct, the crud will be in the exact same place on two or more different scans, just as it would be on a digital camera sensor.

 

What type of scanner? 

 

I only say this as I've never had dust from a scanner show up on several images. For slides, I used a Nikon 5000ED. I have found plastic mounts to attract dust more than cardboard but never what you've described over maybe 20,000 scans.

 

If you used a flatbed scanner, the dust would have to be on the glass below the slide.

 

PM if it helps. I'd offer to call you but my International calling plan went away when switching carriers last week.



#31 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 01:55

R W:

Best wishes on your hospital stay, and when you get back on your feet be sure and post more of your photo selection. Looking forward to seeing them.

Thanks D28. Never had surgery before so I'm somewhat nervous. But I'm crippled right now so it will be worth it. I've moved my computer upstairs so I should be able to post pictures while I'm recovering.



#32 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 03:25

I suspect the detritus was on the film when scanned but since left.

 

It may be worth comparing two scanned slides... if your theory is correct, the crud will be in the exact same place on two or more different scans, just as it would be on a digital camera sensor.

 

What type of scanner? 

 

I only say this as I've never had dust from a scanner show up on several images. For slides, I used a Nikon 5000ED. I have found plastic mounts to attract dust more than cardboard but never what you've described over maybe 20,000 scans.

 

If you used a flatbed scanner, the dust would have to be on the glass below the slide.

 

PM if it helps. I'd offer to call you but my International calling plan went away when switching carriers last week.

Hi E1pix. This is the scanner I am using:

 

img_20641.jpg

 

https://the-gadgetee...scanner-review/

 

Here is an example of one of the scanned slides:

 

PICT0007.jpg

 

The black blob in the lower left appeared in quite a few of the scanned slides in the same location. The vertical line to the right, which I assumed was a hair, was not in as many slides and was never in the same location or orientation. When I ran the slides through my projector, the two features did not appear on any of the slides. There is no obvious way to access the inside of the scanner (the slides are inserted in a side slot and are in a three slide plastic holder) so all I could do is give it a shot of air into the slots on both sides of the unit. When I re-scanned this slide the objects were not there, This led me to conclude that the foreign objects were in the scanner and not on the slides. I suppose they could have been left in the scanner by a slide, or slides, but that seems less likely.



#33 PCC

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 13:00



Hi E1pix. This is the scanner I am using:

 

img_20641.jpg

 

https://the-gadgetee...scanner-review/

 

Here is an example of one of the scanned slides:

 

PICT0007.jpg

 

The black blob in the lower left appeared in quite a few of the scanned slides in the same location. The vertical line to the right, which I assumed was a hair, was not in as many slides and was never in the same location or orientation. When I ran the slides through my projector, the two features did not appear on any of the slides. There is no obvious way to access the inside of the scanner (the slides are inserted in a side slot and are in a three slide plastic holder) so all I could do is give it a shot of air into the slots on both sides of the unit. When I re-scanned this slide the objects were not there, This led me to conclude that the foreign objects were in the scanner and not on the slides. I suppose they could have been left in the scanner by a slide, or slides, but that seems less likely.


Here's a quick stab at cleaning it up in Photoshop using the 'fill' function with 'content aware'. It works, but it's slow and if you had to do it with every image it would sap your motivation to scan. So hopefully you can prevent it rather than fixing it. If anyone can help you it's E1 - no one here has more experience or expertise in this, or more generosity in sharing it.

 

PICT0007.jpgimage sharing



#34 R.W. Mackenzie

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 18:10

Thanks PCC. You did a great job cleaning it up. Looks better than the original slide. I'll try re-scanning them and see what I get.



#35 E1pix

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 18:39

... if you had to do it with every image it would sap your motivation to live.

Hope you don’t mind my corrections to your post. ;-)

Thanks for the nice words, Peter. As you’ve said — and nice cleanup! — this task is done best with clean scans to start with.

Cleanup is mind-blowing, I recently finished all phases to 7,300+ images. The worst was dusting 309 scans from 4x5 film, each 48x60 inches, and all done in our VW Westfalia StudioBus. Screen area occupied by each images in that phase was about 13x16 feet, I calculated the total area that crossed the monitor of just those 309 files to be larger than a football field — with end zones and sidelines and maybe the beer cart. Imagine picking sand grains from that area of land, no wonder it took about 1,000 hours in total just in cleaning.

Here’s our temporary website of only those images, completed two days before we barrel-rolled our van avoiding a deer on 8-30-18, taking all we had since to correct, caption, and keyword the other 7,000 images. Process started in late 2002, but IT IS DONE.

https://ericwunrow.p...elter.com/index

#36 PCC

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 19:57

Hope you don’t mind my corrections to your post. ;-)

https://ericwunrow.p...elter.com/index

You put your finger on what I was thinking, but didn't have the heart to say....

 

Your site looks magnificent - f64 in polychrome! And I spotted a couple of my favourite Canadian places, Cape Spear and Cap d'Or. But tell me the truth, did you arrange those leaves in Terra Nova?



#37 E1pix

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 22:03

Full disclosure: probably. ;-)

But not the slug on the one leaf in the middle.

Thanks for the compliment.

#38 FLB

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Posted Yesterday, 00:58

Nothing to contribute beyond "I love this thread."

I just wanted to say the same thing. These pictures simply ooze with the atmosphere.