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Flame Me, I'm a Tesla Owner


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#1 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 13:03

2020-Tesla-3-MCG-314.jpg

 

 

So I did this on September 10, 2020.

 

It's been an engaging experience so far. The Tesla 3 might be one of the best cars I've ever owned, and it's certainly the most interesting. Many things about the car surprised me, while other aspects turned out to be not a big deal at all, like charging. If you want to know more about Tesla and EVs and have any questions or comments, blaze away. 



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#2 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 13:25

1. Surprises, good or bad.

2. What does it need more of. I don't necessarily mean range but I dunno maybe the brakes are **** or something?

3. What does it not need. Maybe the interface panels are too fancy and you'd be happy with twiddly dials. 

4. What's the reality of build quality? 

 

 

Excellent color co-ord, it looks like the editor's photo for the Tesla owner's club magazine(is there such a thing?)



#3 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 13:40

The biggest surprise is that charging is a non-issue. 

 

Range of this model is 250 miles. The average US driver travels 15,000 miles per year, allegedly, which makes me extremely average. That's around 288 miles a week, so I plug the car in once or twice a week. It's not a worry. We tend to imagine (I did, anyway) that the car will remain tethered to the charger every moment it is not in motion, but it's not that way at all. It's sort of a nothingburger. Meh. Keeping the phone charged is more of a hassle. 

 

I also anticipated constructing an elaborate Charging Shrine in my garage to accommodate the Tesla, with uprated service, dedicated wiring, programmable wall charger, etc. Turns out I didn't need any of that. My mud room/laundry room is right off the attached garage, and there is a 240V NEMA 10-30 wall connector for the electric clothes dryer. I just run a 10-30 15 ft extension cord out into the garage and I am all set. 


Edited by Magoo, 18 January 2021 - 13:44.


#4 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 15:18

Another surprise is an EV thing called "one-pedal driving."  Tesla employs a very aggressive regenerative braking program -- to the point where, if you take your foot off the go pedal at the usual spot, the car will come to a stop very close to the traffic signal without ever touching the brake pedal. This is totally separate from the Autopilot and Full Self Driving functions, which can detect traffic signals and so on. This is wholly a function of the energy conservation strategy.  

 

 

It's unnerving at first, feels unnatural, like a brake caliper is dragging or something, and some people hate it. Me, after gettting used to it I have really grown to enjoy it. But in any event, on the Tesla it is a simple matter to go into the settings and dial back the regen braking so it drives like a conventional car. But then you lose the energy benefit, naturally. I haven't checked to see how much but I expect it is considerable. 


Edited by Magoo, 18 January 2021 - 15:18.


#5 desmo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 16:07

Welcome the the 21st century. Teslas are unbelievably common here in Western Washington where I live, but the take up seems incredibly unevenly distributed. In the little town in Italy where I have a second house I've seen precisely one Tesla, ever. But here in Bellingham, I can't drive two blocks without seeing one coming the other way. And this is with no dealerships within an hour's drive of here.

 

It looks to me like the bodywork and overall fit and finish of Teslas have significantly improved over the ones from a year or two back.



#6 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 16:35

 

It looks to me like the bodywork and overall fit and finish of Teslas have significantly improved over the ones from a year or two back.

 

 

I believe so. The first 2018 Tesla 3s I saw were horrible, from the body welds to the paint. They looked like 1990 Hyundai. But they improved over time and when I went shopping seriously last summer, I looked over every demo on the lot and they were pretty good. Acceptable. I had to order mine sight unseen, which gave me some trepidation, but when I picked up the car I was relieved to discover I got a good one. There is some short peel in the paint in the rear quarters, but overall it is very good. It's not perfect but it's as good as anything Detroit can make. 

 

I was ready to say that Tesla put its fit and finish problems to rest, but then I saw that last week Sandy Munro got one with fairly awful panel gaps on the right side. The price of of quality is eternal vigilance, I suppose. 



#7 404KF2

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 17:14

Well that's really disappointing.  Mind you, Mercedes paint is usually crap too.



#8 Zoe

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 17:43

Another surprise is an EV thing called "one-pedal driving."  Tesla employs a very aggressive regenerative braking program -- 

Can you adjust it? I remember driving one of the first BMW EVs many many years ago which had several levels available. The strongest mode was like driving an R/C model car as the throttle pedal was actually kind of a speed regulator. Needed some getting used to, but then it was cool.



#9 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 17:51

Can you adjust it? I remember driving one of the first BMW EVs many many years ago which had several levels available. The strongest mode was like driving an R/C model car as the throttle pedal was actually kind of a speed regulator. Needed some getting used to, but then it was cool.

 

Yes, it's adjustable. But once I got used to it, I much prefer one pedal driving. 



#10 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 18:10

By far my least favorite part of the Tesla experience is a known problem called "phantom braking."

 

The Autopilot/Full Self Driving System will on ocassion discern a threat that is either not apparent to the driver or does not in fact exist, and apply the brakes---hard. Not quite a panic stop but a rapid and dramatic decel. Irritating at best and terrifying at worst, though it doesn't seem to place the car in any overt danger. 

 

Analyzing the problem as best I can, the best way to make it happen is to have a large truck on your right as you move into the lane adjacent to it, but there are some other recognizable modes as well. 

 

I haven't experienced any phantom braking in two months or so, and I am not completely clear about why. Possibilities: 

 

1. Adaptive learning is correcting the issue. 

2. The regular over-the-air software updates have improved the calibration. Musk has made mention of it. 

3. The driver (me) is unconsciously or semi-consciously avoiding the traffic scenarios that induce the phantom braking events. 

 

 

To be perfectly honest with you, this had me pretty torqued up the first few times. If this had been a traditional Motown product pulling this stunt, I might drive it through the dealer's front window. But I knew what I signed up for and it's all part of the Brave New World of Tesla ownership. I was curious to know what Teslas were like and I am finding out. 



#11 desmo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 18:24

One pedal driving makes perfect sense for an EV although never having driven one it's gotta be weird at first. I think I'd probably have a harder time with the lack of physical switches and pots for HVAC etc. I can easily set all that by feel alone in my old Jetta without taking my eye off the road. I also spend minutes rather than hours per day on my phone, so I assume most people who do spend hours can probably do it all as second nature.   



#12 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 19:03

I can't operate my phone without looking at the screen though. I could check my oil in the dark at this point.

#13 JacnGille

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 19:30

Another surprise is an EV thing called "one-pedal driving."  Tesla employs a very aggressive regenerative braking program -- to the point where, if you take your foot off the go pedal at the usual spot, the car will come to a stop very close to the traffic signal without ever touching the brake pedal.

Do you know if the brake lights come on while doing this? I'd hate to be rear ended from a following car because there were no brake lights in operation.



#14 Zoe

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 19:35

Even if the brake lights came on - braking erratically w/o obvious and significant reason makes the braking driver at least partially responsible. If the driver or the car hits the brakes without reason, he's quite often 100% at fault, brake lights or not.



#15 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 19:46

Do you know if the brake lights come on while doing this? I'd hate to be rear ended from a following car because there were no brake lights in operation.

 

Yes, whenever the regen braking is on the brake lamps are on as well. There is also a ribbon indicator in the instrument display that shows how much braking or accel are applied at that moment. And when you look at the  vehicle avatar at the left side of the display, you can see its brake lamps go on and off. (The electronics on this car are completely integrated, and in the most unexpected and amusing ways. GM couldn't build this car. It's beyond their powers. I still remember when you could order a GM car with two clocks in the dash. Now reflect on the possibility of two car clocks ever reading the same time for very long.) 

 

By the way, the computer will not allow you to engage the brakes and "throttle" at the same time under any circumstances. No smokey burnouts. 


Edited by Magoo, 18 January 2021 - 19:47.


#16 just me again

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 20:22

Yes, it's adjustable. But once I got used to it, I much prefer one pedal driving. 

 


Is it adjustable while driving?. I have been driving a bit in a Kia Nero, which have paddles behind the steering wheel for adjusting regenerative braking. I am normally freewheeling and use the paddles to brake if necessary!

#17 as65p

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 21:15

I'm still irritated by the electronic handbrake I found in the car I bought 2nd hand a year ago. Got used to it, but it will never be the same as a lever.

Beforehand I had researched for the model how you can hack into the board electronics and turn all the annoying alarms off, but the handbrake "feature" I somehow overlooked. :well:

 

So I guess a Teslas bells and whistles would scare the heck out of me... :p



#18 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 21:51

Is it adjustable while driving?. I have been driving a bit in a Kia Nero, which have paddles behind the steering wheel for adjusting regenerative braking. I am normally freewheeling and use the paddles to brake if necessary!

 

Adjustable while driving, but you have to tap through two screens to get to it so it's not easy to do on the fly. 



#19 Magoo

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 22:07

 

3. What does it not need. Maybe the interface panels are too fancy and you'd be happy with twiddly dials. 

 

 

 

1. The complete glass roof panel. It's nice and all, but the UV tinting is dark and after a while you forget the glass is even there. I could live with or without it, either way. 

 

2. Full Self Driving (FSD). It's quite advanced and impressive but it's still not truly autonomous. You have to be there and in the moment to supervise while your Tesla is driving you around. So at the end of the day, it's a gadget. It doesn't serve an indispensible purpose. It's fascinating to learn and watch and fun to play with, but the car is just as enjoyable to drive with all that stuff shut off. The handling and road manners are extremely pleasant. 

 

 

These items and a few others point to an interesting product planning issue for Elon. Recently he said he could do a car for USD $25,000, which was met with some skepticism. When I look at the Tesla 3, I have no doubt that he could do it. Piece of cake. He just doesn't want or need to right now because he can sell all the Model 3 and Model Y cars he can make. 



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#20 Canuck

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 23:01

Would you buy one for your kid you were about to send off to school on the other side of the country?

 

My take on Tesla is they seem to be very much like Apple. They build a fairly decent product this is generally pleasurable to use and they do a good job of hiding the sausage factory. The moment you start moving outside the bounds of what they've deemed acceptable behaviour, they stop being this amazing beacon of the ecological future and reveal their dark corporate underbelly. I'm not a Musk fanboy but I like what's doing, generally. In fact I think it's pretty remarkable that one guy is the founding force behind these substantially disruptive companies that are also successful. But woe be to those who cross him (and that takes a lot of shine off for me).

 

Edit - nice to see you here :)


Edited by Canuck, 18 January 2021 - 23:02.


#21 GreenMachine

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 23:26

Yes, good to see you back, Mr M  :clap:

 

Interesting to see your perspective on ownership, thanks for posting.

 

I note your comment about being 'present' when the car is self-driving.  I'd be interested in the frequency and how long (time) you typically use this function, and the nature(s) of the typical self-drive trip (commute? touring? highway?) and how difficult you find the supervision task to be given all you are doing is watching, not 'doing'.  Is maintaining concentration an issue?



#22 Hyatt

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Posted 19 January 2021 - 06:11

 

 

So I did this on September 10, 2020.

 

[...]

 

Congratz :) I'm about to pull the trigger as well .. 



#23 Greg Locock

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Posted 19 January 2021 - 09:05

Here's my garage of production cars I'd like to have as science experiments:

 

Stanley Steamer

Prius

Volt

a Tesla ( doesn't matter which)

 

So Magoo, great to see you back, what level of auto-kamikaze-pilot did you sign up to?



#24 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 19 January 2021 - 19:15

Why Tesla over A N Other EV? 



#25 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 08:44

So Magoo, great to see you back, what level of auto-kamikaze-pilot did you sign up to?

 

 

I have Autopilot and Full Self Driving (FSD) which is the highest level of self-driving Tesla offers --- except for the Beta version some Tesla owners got, which includes "Navigate on City Streets." 

 

Ordinary FSD like I have can do point-to-point navigation, but only on limited access highways. You drive it to the on-ramp, it drops you off at the off-ramp. When Navigate on City Streets arrives sometime this year, it will be able to true point-to-point. Even the interface is fiendishly complicated, looks interesting. 



#26 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 08:46

Why Tesla over A N Other EV? 

 

Tesla is several years ahead of the industry IMO. 



#27 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 09:03

 

So I guess a Teslas bells and whistles would scare the heck out of me... :p

 

 

I hate iPhone updates, sorting out router problems, learning software updates, et alia. I should hate Tesla ownership because it is all about that sort of fiddling. But so far it hasn't been too bad in that regard. Tesla is better organized than most. 



#28 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 10:00

Yes, good to see you back, Mr M  :clap:

 

Interesting to see your perspective on ownership, thanks for posting.

 

I note your comment about being 'present' when the car is self-driving.  I'd be interested in the frequency and how long (time) you typically use this function, and the nature(s) of the typical self-drive trip (commute? touring? highway?) and how difficult you find the supervision task to be given all you are doing is watching, not 'doing'.  Is maintaining concentration an issue?

 

 

When I first got the car, using FSD was terrifying. It was like sitting in the passenger seat with a 15 year-old learner behind the wheel. It was the opposite of relaxing. It was far more exhausting than simply driving the car oneself. But as time went on and I developed more faith in the system, it got easier. Now it hardly bothers me at all. But that said, I will never be like the lunatics who turn on their Autopilot and take a nap. I can't imagine what these people are thinking. 



#29 Greg Locock

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 10:21

I'd turn on autopilot and after 15 minutes I'd be dead to the world. Or dead. We did have a demo day with AVs, and watching the diagnostics was great, but we didn't get the chance to just switch them on and relax. But i know what i'm like.



#30 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 10:23

A common criticism of Tesla is that the cars lack "personality" or "soul." Since cars are machines and don't really have a personality, that is a rather hard one to sort. People are trying to describe some subjective quality that summons up a poetic metaphor. But if I may, I find that the Tesla has more "personality" than any car I have ever owned. 

 

For example, the self-driving ability. When I first got the car, this feature terrified me. But as I observed it for a while, I learned that it's not a bad driver, it simply drives differently than I do. It overtakes, changes lanes, drops into on-ramps in a pattern different than mine. It takes a different line through corners and occupies a different space between lane markers than I do. And because it is a machine, it does everything exactly the same every time, more or less. 

 

That is to say: the car has a recognizable, predictable driving style. Of its own. If that is not personality, what is? 



#31 Hyatt

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 14:28

btw: is it SR or LR? you feel a bit unfortunate you bought it just before the refresh-model was available?



#32 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 14:44

Tesla is several years ahead of the industry IMO. 

 

Car? Recharging? Other? I just wonder how it compares like for like, if such a thing exists. Teslas don't have dealerships(?) so how does maintenance work. Or are you expecting far less maintenance as I assume there's no oil change scheduled and any issues will be software based?

 

Good, insightful, comment about the driver aids. I'd never thought about it like that. We all want vehicles to be predictable or at least consistent. Whether that's lane safety or an F1 qualifying lap. It's weird because we're not used to it. I found ABS 'funny' until I adjusted to it. 



#33 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 19:02

Would you buy one for your kid you were about to send off to school on the other side of the country?

 

 

Well, first there is the issue of giving a college kid a new $50,000 car, but I presume that is not what you were asking.

 

Then there is the issue of giving a college kid a car that is quicker and faster than any '60s muscle car, but I bet you weren't asking that either.

 

I assume you are talking about reliability, and there my answer is yes. There is no maintenance. Zero. (Tire rotation if you are a proponent.) No fluids to change or check, nothing. There are no reliability issues of which I am aware, and in five months and 5,000 miles I haven't experienced any. Zero dealer visits. Not a squeak or a rattle. The warranty includes 24/7 roadside assistance. If you can teach the kid to mind the tire pressure monitor, you're all set. 



#34 KWSN - DSM

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 19:05

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#35 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 19:23

Car? Recharging? Other? I just wonder how it compares like for like, if such a thing exists. Teslas don't have dealerships(?) so how does maintenance work. Or are you expecting far less maintenance as I assume there's no oil change scheduled and any issues will be software based?

 

 

Tesla has a big edge in range currently, some edge in performance, a significant edge in efficiency, and a giant edge in charging infrastructure. Over Porsche, VW, GM, Ford. Three years ago, Tesla was a good three years ahead of the industry in EV technology. Now three years later, Tesla is still three years ahead. We used to eagerly await for the latest EV to arrive, anticipating that someone could possibly get the jump on Tesla. That is not the yardstick anymore. The question now is, is it as good as Tesla? The closer they get to Tesla, the more they Understand how good Tesla is. 

 

 

Tesla has a big edge not just in EV technology but in electronics and integration overall. A Tesla 3/Y is as integrated as any car on the road, but with less wire. It's done with RF, and it's scary how good and clever it is. One reason I bought a Tesla was to explore all this stuff for myself. The things I was hearing from around the industry were hard to believe. 

 

Software updates are almost weekly and arrive over the air. You sync it up to your Wi-Fi router. It lives in the internet of things. 



#36 Magoo

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 19:36

My take on Tesla is they seem to be very much like Apple. They build a fairly decent product this is generally pleasurable to use and they do a good job of hiding the sausage factory. The moment you start moving outside the bounds of what they've deemed acceptable behaviour, they stop being this amazing beacon of the ecological future and reveal their dark corporate underbelly. I'm not a Musk fanboy but I like what's doing, generally. In fact I think it's pretty remarkable that one guy is the founding force behind these substantially disruptive companies that are also successful. But woe be to those who cross him (and that takes a lot of shine off for me).

 

To me, it looks like Elon has picked up a case of billionaire's disease, and is about one press release away from going full Bond VIllain. He named his kid after typographical symbols or something, and the secret moon base will be next. 

 

Seems like only yesterday he was starting an electric car company to Make The World A Better Place, and now today here he is telling the state of California that he doesn't follow trivial human laws, and too bad if a few thousand of his workers get COVID-19. All these mortal worries pale in comparison to his Vision, and how dare we get in the way. 

 

You know, this is probably just what Henry Ford was like. 


Edited by Magoo, 20 January 2021 - 19:40.


#37 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 20 January 2021 - 20:12

Didn't Henry Ford have people shot? Or fired upon?



#38 Magoo

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 00:42

btw: is it SR or LR? you feel a bit unfortunate you bought it just before the refresh-model was available?

 

 

I have a late 2020 Model 3 Standard Range Plus, and its rated range is 250 miles. The latest version of this car for MY 2021 is rated at 263 miles. That is not terribly significant, and in fact it is even less significant than it looks. 

 

In real world use, one seldom charges one's Tesla up to full capacity, for several reasons. First, unless you are taking a trip that day, you don't need it. In order to control battery temp and maximize battery life, the charging rate slows down (current is reduced) the closer the battery gets to full charge. It's a Xeno's paradox kind of deal -- the last 10 or 20 miles on the charger take relatively forever. So in less you are headed down the road and need every mile of range available, to save time you short charge. Generally, I charge to 200 to 220 miles. 

 

A second reason not to charge to the very tippy top of capacity is that the regenerative braking will no longer work because there is no headroom to send the braking energy into. The system can only launch the energy out into the aether. So with a completely full charge you 1) take a significant hit in efficiency 2) and lose the driving benefit of regenerative braking, of which I have become very fond. 225 miles is the max charge without cutting into the regen braking. 



#39 Magoo

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 01:01

Didn't Henry Ford have people shot? Or fired upon?

 

I'm rambling, but he was more into beatings. The Rouge had a large team of professional thugs. Actual gangsters, professionals. If you examine the photos from the Battle of the Overpass, you will see true professionals plying their trade. 

 

Back to the soul of the Tesla, such as it is. Many folks with a traditional ICE background say EVs have no character because they don't do the things ICE cars do. Like belch, fart, miss, cough, sputter, flood, stall, surge, hesitate, fishbite, etc. All the things that piston engines can be counted on to do, that is. In contrast, an EV just runs, like a blender or a vacuum cleaner, which I suppose is to be regarded as soulless. Okay, fine. 

 

But to me, this is the soul of the EV. It just runs, without all that. The power is utterly seamless --- perfect in delivery. It never falters, ever,  There is no shifting, lurch, driveline snatch, nothing. Just instantaneous torque and lots of it. To me, after four of five decades of ICE, that is magical. I wonder if this was maybe what they were trying to achieve with gas turbines. I find it utterly enjoyable, and to me it is a key element of the car's character.

 

Every day I drive an electric car, the idea of a gasoline car becomes more bizarre and impractical to me. Like a gasoline powered dishwasher or a gasoline powered guitar amplifier. For decades we have been taught that the ICE is ideally suited to automobile use. Really? Then why does it need an eight-speed transmission? 


Edited by Magoo, 21 January 2021 - 01:02.


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#40 gruntguru

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 01:59

My computer is coal-fired. Took me 10 minutes to type this - after the two hour warmup.

 

Seriously - seems to me most of the EV knockers have never driven a Tesla - and even fewer have actually owned one.



#41 Greg Locock

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 05:18

No guns just goons. https://www.peoplesw...r-of-the-press/



#42 Hyatt

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 06:10

[...]

Every day I drive an electric car, the idea of a gasoline car becomes more bizarre and impractical to me. Like a gasoline powered dishwasher or a gasoline powered guitar amplifier. For decades we have been taught that the ICE is ideally suited to automobile use. Really? Then why does it need an eight-speed transmission? 

Batterys need to make a step Imho. Still too many limitations: energy density, temperature sensitiveness (cars tend to 'cold-gate' - reduce charging speed when battery is cold), wear, self-discharge, ... 

The new Model3 has a heatpump. It takes heat from the battery to heat up the cabin. By doing so it cools the battery down so much the car hardly moves anymore  :drunk:

I wonder how used car dealers would handle EVs. If they have several dozens or hundreds cars sitting around. If you don't care, their batterys will deep discharge and render the car scrap. 



#43 Greg Locock

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 06:48

OK, what's the self discharge vs time graph for an EV? I'd guess months rather than weeks to 50%. How long do cars spend on lots without any attention? Anyway i'd have thought it would go through various levels of 'sleep' before switching every system off completely.

 

Renault don't seem bothered https://easyelectric...period-of-time/



#44 Hyatt

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 07:53

i just know reports from people who parked their Tesla at the airport, went away for 2 weeks, came back and the car lost ~20%. Maybe thats because the car is always online? In another case the owner on vacation saw in the tesla app that the SoC was dropping to far, called up a friend, remotely unlocked the car so the friend could drive it to a charger .... weird times :)



#45 just me again

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 08:46

In real world use, one seldom charges one's Tesla up to full capacity, for several reasons. First, unless you are taking a trip that day, you don't need it. In order to control battery temp and maximize battery life, the charging rate slows down (current is reduced) the closer the battery gets to full charge. It's a Xeno's paradox kind of deal -- the last 10 or 20 miles on the charger take relatively forever. So in less you are headed down the road and need every mile of range available, to save time you short charge. Generally, I charge to 200 to 220 miles.


I do think most here put their EV in the charge when coming home. And it stays in the charge until driven next time!

#46 jcbc3

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 12:03

I'm as computerized as everyone with laptops, tablets and smart phone. So I should be able to understand and appreciate the Use Interface Tesla has chosen. But some things I have heard would make it a close to no-go for me so I would like your take on it.

 

AMAZING or just a cost saving measure for Tesla and not that well thought out even....

 

There are a couple of things I've been told about it that I would like your take on:

 

To adjust a wing mirror you have to enter a sub menu before manipulating the mirrors with the ball buttons?

I.e. look at THE BIG SCREEN. Punch screen twice for correct sub menu. Place thump on ball button. Look at wing mirror, when manipulating ball button. Punch screen to get back to main display on screen.

 

Riding in the rear seat on a cold day. Knowing the car has heated (and cooled?) rear seats look for button to turn the roaster on. Can't find it so have to ask driver (or passenger) to go to the BIG SCREEN. Go to sub menu. Set rear seat to roast. When roasted through having to politely ask the driver or co-driver to turn it off again.

 

Do you have other examples of the UI being a help or a hindrance?



#47 BRG

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 12:48

I'm in the 'make EVs as much like ICE Cars as possible' camp.  Tesla do well there in terms of styling - none of the 'Look at MEEE!!' design cues that BMW fell for.  But Tesla's obsessive love of gimmickry inside the car, and insistence on the big screen control approach is a downer.  There was nothing wrong with the way almost all cars laid out their controls for decades, often after lengthy ergonomic research, & generally designed to use easily whilst in motion and with the minimum of distraction.  Having to refer to a central screen for almost everything bar the steering seems a risky option to me.

 

As for Tesla being three years ahead, I don't think they are anymore.  The Porsche Taycan is a match in everything except price.  But then, it is a Porsche!



#48 Magoo

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 13:35

OK, what's the self discharge vs time graph for an EV? I'd guess months rather than weeks to 50%. How long do cars spend on lots without any attention? Anyway i'd have thought it would go through various levels of 'sleep' before switching every system off completely.

 

Renault don't seem bothered https://easyelectric...period-of-time/

 

Yes, the question is highly variable and complicated. Parastic battery drain rate (called "vampire drain" in the Tesla owner cult) depends largely on what you leave turned on when the car is parked, including Sentry Mode and standby for the Summon function. At some point over time the car will shut off these functions and force sleep mode, but that is a matter of days later. Anecdotally, I have heard of owners leaving their cars parked at the airport for up to 80 days and still have useful charge remaining. 

 

But if the vehicle does not enact sleep mode, the discharge rate can be fairly high, as much as one mile per hour. When not in sleep mode, the car will maintain the battery and cabin temperatures within a defined range. Tesla has determined that this strategy is more efficient than trying to play catchup on vehicle startup. As we know, ICE automobiles traditionally have absurd overcapacity in their HVAC systems so the occupants can get comfortable quickly in extreme ambient temperatures. Here Tesla chooses to stay in front of that to some extent. If you like, you can go into the settings and shut off the cabin preconditioning part of the deal (squeezing out a bit more range) but I like it and leave it enabled. 



#49 Ross Stonefeld

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 13:37

Who parks for 80 days, get a taxi/shuttle  :lol:



#50 Magoo

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Posted 21 January 2021 - 13:52

 

There are a couple of things I've been told about it that I would like your take on:

 

To adjust a wing mirror you have to enter a sub menu before manipulating the mirrors with the ball buttons?

I.e. look at THE BIG SCREEN. Punch screen twice for correct sub menu. Place thump on ball button. Look at wing mirror, when manipulating ball button. Punch screen to get back to main display on screen.

 

Riding in the rear seat on a cold day. Knowing the car has heated (and cooled?) rear seats look for button to turn the roaster on. Can't find it so have to ask driver (or passenger) to go to the BIG SCREEN. Go to sub menu. Set rear seat to roast. When roasted through having to politely ask the driver or co-driver to turn it off again.

 

Do you have other examples of the UI being a help or a hindrance?

 

 

Yes, those two items are accurate. Since I am the only driver of my car and I seldom have rear seat passengers, these are not issues for me, but I can certainly see how they would be important to many owners. 

 

I have seen a number of Tesla 3 bugs of this nature corrected with the over-the-air software updates. Of course, they can't add hard switches for the rear seat heaters over the air, but they could make the UI command more accessible. It's a matter of priorities, I suppose. They can't jam everything on the main screen. But my screen has changed significantly since September when I bought the car, continually providing minor improvements. 

 

This is interesting: My Tesla 3 is not equipped with rear seat heaters, only front. I had no use for rear heaters so I didn't check that box. But they are in the car. If I want rear seat heaters at some point, I need only go to the Tesla website and pay $300, and they will be turned on for me. Clever, no. Tesla has been slow to learn the ways of the car industry in some areas, but in some others they are right on top of it.