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The Rarest Ford Mustang Collectors Don’t Want


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#1 Bob Riebe

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Posted 14 September 2022 - 22:32

I am putting this here because it fits better.

 

 

 

https://www.msn.com/...98917a1f51adac2

 

 

"Car collectors base desirability on many factors, but probably at the top of the list are rarity and high performance. And that’s why the 1969 Ford Mustang E is a conundrum. It is one of the rarest production Mustangs ever made, at 96, and also the most feeble that year. It was only available with the “Thriftpower” 250 ci straight-six stomach pump. Yet, it was a special edition that usually moves cars up collectors’ lists. So, what’s the story behind this rare, undesirable classic Mustang?

First, many consider the 1969 Mustang to be the pinnacle of Mustang design. Especially the Sports Roof fastback. And you could only order the “E” as a Sports Roof. But there were also a lot of other Mustangs choices you couldn’t get with the E. Like air conditioning. But you did get a 2.33:1 rear end. 

The reason for the small engine, no air, and tall gear should be obvious. These Mustangs were to be the ultimate in E-conomy. Air conditioning saps power, and a 2.33:1 gear ratio affords less torque, also preserving fuel consumption. But you’ll definitely not be winning any drag races with it.

Ford had a reason for making the E, and that was to enter the annual Mobilgas Economy Run. Winners used it as a marketing tool, though few would want to drive cars configured strictly for fuel economy, as was the case with the E. Mobil required a run of at least 50 cars to qualify, thus the low production numbers. Even Ford knew the actual cars equipped like this were a dead end.

Also, a dead end was the Mobilgas Economy Runs. Mobile canceled it in 1969 after having been around since 1936. Ford didn’t know that until after production of the E had begun. So the 96 Mustang E models got eeked out to dealerships hoping to find just enough economy-minded buyers that loved the new 1969 looks.

 

Anecdotally, we would suspect that most if not all of these stones saw V8 engine swaps or even being turned into race cars at some point. After all, it’s a 1969 Mustang fastback. That means intact, original Mustang Es are extremely rare. But other than those who see it as a quirky car with an interesting backstory, collectors want more. And in 1969, the amount of highly desirable Mustangs went way up.

In that first year of the new body styles, Ford introduced the Mustang Mach I, Boss 302, and Boss 429. That’s a bunch of collectibility. And that was the next-to-last year of the Shelby Mustang, which came in either a Sports Roof or a convertible. So there’s some more highly-collectible Mustang joy.

So all of this combined to snuff out most interest in seeking out and restoring a Mustang E. With its purpose killed by Mobil, and these other factors, it’s a “1969 Mustang but-.” A 1969 Mustang but stripped and without power. 

Would we turn one down? Of course not, it’s a 1969 Sports Roof. Would we swap a V8, even today? Absolutely. And we’d change the rear end and maybe even add air conditioning."

 

1969-Ford-Mustang-E-Ford-2.jpeg

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IF, if I could find one I would not put a V-8, or wussy air-conditioning in but I would  up grade the suspension and see just how many horse power one can get out of that I-6, without air-blower exhaust turbine.

 


Edited by Bob Riebe, 15 September 2022 - 00:21.


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#2 Greg Locock

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Posted 14 September 2022 - 23:50

I6 not V6.

 

The EA Falcon was introduced with a 3.9 litre engine and a cheaper to run (by not much i'd guess) 3.2, basically a short stroke 3.9

 

I don't know how many were sold, but probably a handful. 

 

That's a shame, with a turbo the 3.2 would be a nice engine, free revving. Instead we eventually bored the 3.9 out to 4.0, turboed it,  and turned it into a 400 hp grin machine.



#3 Bob Riebe

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Posted 15 September 2022 - 00:19

I6 not V6.

 

The EA Falcon was introduced with a 3.9 litre engine and a cheaper to run (by not much i'd guess) 3.2, basically a short stroke 3.9

 

I don't know how many were sold, but probably a handful. 

 

That's a shame, with a turbo the 3.2 would be a nice engine, free revving. Instead we eventually bored the 3.9 out to 4.0, turboed it,  and turned it into a 400 hp grin machine.

I grew up with the straight sixes and knew it was a straight six but have been hynotized by the V six bangers Detroit have tossed out I could not save my self.
 



#4 404KF2

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Posted 15 September 2022 - 02:04

I kind of like it.



#5 Sterzo

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Posted 15 September 2022 - 19:15

Never having owned a classic car I may not be the best person to comment, but to me the whole point of preserving an old car is that it's an old car. Originality counts above all else. What's the point of acquiring an historical artefact and hacking it about? I've seen better-looking people than Tutankhamun - should we improve his mask?



#6 ray b

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Posted 16 September 2022 - 16:49

at one point about 79 ? maybe

 

the 6 banger convert ponys with a ever rarer 4 speed stick

 

were the HOT HOT mustake to lust after in the early cars

 

I remember as I told a buddy's G/F her 65 stick 6 convert would never be valuable/colletable

when she was a room mate in 1970

was wrong on that call

but did tell her the trick V8 were the MONEY cars 289K 302 boss or cobra jets 427/428/429



#7 ray b

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Posted 16 September 2022 - 17:00

Never having owned a classic car I may not be the best person to comment, but to me the whole point of preserving an old car is that it's an old car. Originality counts above all else. What's the point of acquiring an historical artefact and hacking it about? I've seen better-looking people than Tutankhamun - should we improve his mask?

no the american way is to hot rod the puppys

esp for drags light weight is a key hard to buy lot of work to get

motor can be built or just a new latest greatest dropped in version found

[mostly from wrecks swapped on the cheap]

 

in the future the striped car super cheap version will be super RARE

AS NOBODY BOTHERS TO KEEP THEM

 

many 57 chevys with FI are in collections and the other hi power versions

many others got swapped in 350v8's or better trans not made in 57

up to LS1 and newer versions cheap eazy to get and way better in every way

 

darn few 6's with 2 speeds in 4 doors are collected

 

but why would you want one ?



#8 Bob Riebe

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Posted 16 September 2022 - 23:43



 

"darn few 6's with 2 speeds in 4 doors are collected

 

but why would you want one ?"

===================================

 

Daily driver.

First Camaro I drove was a six banger with a three speed manual; would love to have one like that now, although one could pull the Chevy Six and put in a GMC Six with the cross flow cylinder head for a little more pop. :lol:


Edited by Bob Riebe, 17 September 2022 - 16:12.


#9 Fat Boy

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Posted 20 September 2022 - 18:38

Never having owned a classic car I may not be the best person to comment, but to me the whole point of preserving an old car is that it's an old car. Originality counts above all else. What's the point of acquiring an historical artefact and hacking it about? I've seen better-looking people than Tutankhamun - should we improve his mask?

There's one Tutankhamun. There was a couple million Mustangs of that era. While there's certainly a place for a perfectly stock representation in a museum or as a "this is what is was" type of conversation piece, but it completely misses the point of owning one of these cars. All of these Pony Car / Muscle Car models were 85% cars. You get 85% of what you want from the factory and the last 15% is whatever you make it. If you want slot mags and spoiler? go for it. You want a bumpy camshaft? sure. This is the individuality component that Euro's in particular tend to miss about our car silliness. We are an individualistic society and our cars often reflect, to one extent or another, who we are as individuals. They are not simply tools because we spend too much bloody time and have, to one extent or the other, disposable income for frivalities. In a similar way that a pet is often viewed as a family member, Americans will often kind of adopt their car. It's a little strange, but it's real, nonetheless.



#10 Fat Boy

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Posted 20 September 2022 - 18:40

This is also important to understand concerning the pricing of anything: Just because it's rare does not mean it's valuable.