Jump to content


Photo

Piers Courage (merged)


  • Please log in to reply
118 replies to this topic

#1 Martyj

Martyj
  • Member

  • 191 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 04 August 2003 - 16:44

Two things:

1) In the new issue of F1 Magazine, there is a brief mention that there is a new book about Piers Courage. Any one have information about this?

1) In absense of me ever seeing this book, I'd like to get a thread going to compile whatever information there is about this sometimes forgotten driver. I know he doesn't at all rank near the greats, though he had a pair of stellar second place finishes in private Brabhams. I know that it was documented that he lost a lot of confidence with the DeTomaso, and was making a lot of mistakes as result. What I find more intriging is that he, like Jo Bonnier and Elio DeAngelis, is off track a more well-rounded individaul than his peers. Charles Fox wrote a wonderful piece for "Car and Driver" about 15 years ago that explored this a bit. And also that he was one of the more universally liked drivers in the paddock. Anyone have any Piers Courage tales?

Advertisement

#2 David Force

David Force
  • Member

  • 287 posts
  • Joined: June 03

Posted 04 August 2003 - 17:27

The book is by Adam Cooper who spent 4 years researching and writing it. It has stacks of unseen photos and is one of THE very best books out there whether you wear your anorak whilst reading it or not.

Its not hard to find so go buy it.

#3 provapr

provapr
  • Member

  • 37 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 04 August 2003 - 17:33

Agreed, it's a superb read and goes way beyond camshafts and understeer. The most pognant chapters are towards the end, particularly with regard to his sad demise and the unfortunate accident that befell his son, Jason. Highly recommended from this end...

#4 provapr

provapr
  • Member

  • 37 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 04 August 2003 - 17:35

Sorry - poignant...

#5 Martyj

Martyj
  • Member

  • 191 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 04 August 2003 - 17:43

Wow, I was unaware of this book and it's availability. Are you guys in England? I've not seen it here in the States.

#6 917

917
  • Member

  • 325 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 04 August 2003 - 18:18

"Classic & Sports Car", August 2003, pages 146-149: "Courage best - Adam Cooper offers a taster of his book on racer Piers Courage".

A small panel there says: "Piers Courage - Last of the Gentlemen Racers", by Adam Cooper, is published by Haynes, and available from July 9 (ISBN 1-85960-663-6, 30 Pounds Sterling).

#7 2F-001

2F-001
  • Member

  • 3,823 posts
  • Joined: November 01

Posted 04 August 2003 - 18:38

I came across Adam Cooper in some bookseller's tent at Goodwood the other week - had I been feeling a little more flush with cash I would have bought it (and asked Mr. Cooper to sign it!). He was discussing the book with said dealer - who thought the initial print run was huge for such a book (can't recall the figure) but it was selling well and Adam was pondering what his next subject should be. All the major UK dealers have it, I think. Looks like a nice book. I always though Adam was a real enthusiast and wrote entertainingly in Autosport. Come to think of it, why isn't he on TNF?

(When I said ''bought it'' I meant the book, not the tent.)

#8 WGD706

WGD706
  • Member

  • 956 posts
  • Joined: August 02

Posted 04 August 2003 - 18:50

According to the grandprix.com encyclopedia, Piers Courage preferred to stay with Frank Williams into the 1970 season instead of accepting an offer from Ferrari. Apparently, Piers was good friends with Jonathan Williams, who raced for Ferrari in F2 in1967.(The F2 car was slow arriving and Ferrari allowed Williams to race for De Sanctis in the Monza Lottery - which he won. At the end of the season Williams made his Grand Prix debut in the second Ferrari at the Mexican GP, standing in for the injured Mike Parkes. He finished eighth.
In 1968 he won the Monza Lottery for a third time but his international career faded as Enzo Ferrari became excited about newcomers Jacky Ickx and Derek Bell.)
Perhaps wiser by the unjust treatment Jonathan Williams had received by the Scuderia in 1967, Courage turned it down and chose to stick with FWR.
He'd raced in Formula 3 and 2 throughout much of the 1960s and briefly contested Grands Prix for the BRM team before really making his name in 1969 in the Williams Brabham.
http://www.gpracing....careers/140.cfm

#9 Cirrus

Cirrus
  • Member

  • 1,711 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 04 August 2003 - 20:19

I liked the story (told recently in Motorsport - I think) where Frank Williams recalls his Euopean travels with Piers Courage in F3. Apparently, even though they often slept rough in the back of a van, Piers C insisted on changing into his pyjamas before retiring, resulting in many bemused onlookers witnessing the bizarre sight of him, having chnged into his, no doubt, stylish silk bedwear, walking across a car park clutching a sponge bag and small towel in order to perform his nighttime ablutions at some ghastly public toilet.

Britain has been responsible for many negative things throughout the years, but 24 carat eccentricity is something for which we can be very proud.

#10 Jeroen Brink

Jeroen Brink
  • Member

  • 171 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 04 August 2003 - 20:27

One of the more fascinating racing drivers. Nigel Roebuck wrote many tributes, but the one on Piers Courage is reallz superb and makes one regret not having been able to watch him.

I have to think regularly about him as I drive with my bicycle past the east side of the Zandvoort-track into the dunes. Not nice.

#11 wherezmyz

wherezmyz
  • Member

  • 62 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 04 August 2003 - 22:14

Originally posted by Martyj
Wow, I was unaware of this book and it's availability. Are you guys in England? I've not seen it here in the States.

Try www.amazon.co.uk. I ordered my copy of the book on a Wednesday and it arrived the next Monday. Less than a week to the States isn't too bad.

#12 ensign14

ensign14
  • Member

  • 50,698 posts
  • Joined: December 01

Posted 05 August 2003 - 06:01

Originally posted by 2F-001
IAdam was pondering what his next subject should be.

He mentioned Denny Hulme - he has spoken to many members of Hulme's family. Should be worth waiting for, most info about Denny is him as linked with Brabham and McLaren rather than as an individual.

#13 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 05 August 2003 - 15:23

Originally posted by WGD706
He'd raced in Formula 3 and 2 throughout much of the 1960s and briefly contested Grands Prix for the BRM team

[pedantic hat on] AFAIK, he never drove for the BRM team - he did, however, drive a BRM for the Parnell team! [/pedantic hat off]


__________________

Guantánamo is everywhere!

#14 David McKinney

David McKinney
  • Member

  • 14,156 posts
  • Joined: November 00

Posted 05 August 2003 - 15:59

In the same vein...
He did drive for the BRM team, though not in world championship GPs

#15 fines

fines
  • Member

  • 9,647 posts
  • Joined: September 00

Posted 05 August 2003 - 16:40

:o :blush:


__________________

Guantánamo is everywhere!

#16 Martyj

Martyj
  • Member

  • 191 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 05 August 2003 - 17:42

Other than that Tasman race in the rain in 68, did he ever actually win anything? I'm remembering in his last year he did endurance races with Alfa Romeo, and I wonder if he won any of those?

Of course, I'm sure this question is answered in the book.

#17 Rob Ryder

Rob Ryder
  • Member

  • 2,513 posts
  • Joined: June 00

Posted 05 August 2003 - 21:32

Originally posted by Martyj
Other than that Tasman race in the rain in 68, did he ever actually win anything?


F3
29/08/66 Les Leston Trophy Brands Hatch Lotus 41

F2
22/12/68 Temporada Series Buenos Aires Brabham BT23C
24/08/69 Mediterranean Grand Prix Enna-Pergusa Brabham BT30

Tasman
04/03/68 South Pacific Trophy Longford McLaren M4A
25/01/69 Teretonga International Teretonga Brabham BT24

Sportscars
18/01/70 Buenos Aires Cup Buenos Aires Alfa Romeo T33/3 (with Andrea de Adamich)

Probably other races but this is all I have on record ;)

Rob

#18 theunions

theunions
  • Member

  • 638 posts
  • Joined: October 02

Posted 30 September 2003 - 21:03

Received it yesterday...looks very intriguing just skimming rapidly through it.

I'm thinking of doing an online book review...does anyone here have a photo from their own collection that would be useful for illustrating it?

#19 Ralliart

Ralliart
  • Member

  • 669 posts
  • Joined: June 02

Posted 01 October 2003 - 08:30

In the book on Williams that came out in the early 80's, there is quite a bit about Piers Courage. I've got a copy (autographed by Williams when my brother came across him during a skiing holiday in California!) but it's not handy at the moment. I will buy a copy of the Courage biography when it makes its way to my local outlet (along with the book on Chris Amon). IF they don't get them pretty soon, though, I'll have to order them. Really looking forward to reading both books.

Advertisement

#20 brooster51

brooster51
  • Member

  • 210 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:55

Originally posted by Martyj
Other than that Tasman race in the rain in 68, did he ever actually win anything? I'm remembering in his last year he did endurance races with Alfa Romeo, and I wonder if he won any of those?

Of course, I'm sure this question is answered in the book.


I think if you look at the '65 and '66 F3 seasons, Piers Courage was one of the leading F3 drivers along with the likes of Roy Pike and Chris Irwin. I think in '66 he won the Craven 'A' championship which was effectively the French F3 championship of that year. I'd say he was clearly a comer if he'd survived the Dallara. I think he was very underated.

#21 RS2000

RS2000
  • Member

  • 2,419 posts
  • Joined: January 05

Posted 16 January 2005 - 15:44

I would have to say the best motorsport book in some time (and I was even able to borrow it from the local library). Learnt a lot from it I didnt know (including Max Moseley's politically incorrect tale of negotiating Junction 7 of the M4....).

#22 vintageautomobilia

vintageautomobilia
  • Member

  • 231 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 16 January 2005 - 21:06

Posted Image


Here is a photo I have in my shop of Piers Courage in the Brabham Ford V8 at the 1969 French Grand Prix at Clermont-Ferrand. This large framed photo on canvas, copyright by the photographer, Carl Imber, was commercially available quite a few years ago. I haven't seen another one of these in a very long time.

I believe Piers Courage was killed in his next race. I've heard it said, by those who would know, that he had the talent to be World Champion.

#23 Andrew Fellowes

Andrew Fellowes
  • Member

  • 747 posts
  • Joined: November 03

Posted 17 January 2005 - 01:26

Thats a stunning photo, thanks for posting it because Piers was my hero, my absolute hero. Perhaps something to do with being the first F1 drivers I met.

Oh what a tragedy Albert Poon scrapped his Brabham BT30.

#24 Geza Sury

Geza Sury
  • Member

  • 942 posts
  • Joined: March 01

Posted 17 January 2005 - 07:49

Originally posted by vintageautomobilia
Here is a photo I have in my shop of Piers Courage in the Brabham Ford V8 at the 1969 French Grand Prix at Clermont-Ferrand. (...) I believe Piers Courage was killed in his next race.

No, Piers crashed fatally a year later, during the Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort.

#25 Gary Davies

Gary Davies
  • Member

  • 4,675 posts
  • Joined: April 01

Posted 17 January 2005 - 09:49

I shouldn't be asking this question because Piers was active at a time when I spent about 26 hours a day thinking and reading about motor racing (in contrast to today when it's about 0.26 hours a day : ) but ... how good was Piers Courage? How much potential did he really have?

I always admired the manner (and rough living) of his rise through the lower formulae.

Of course, his career encompassed but two full Grand Prix seasons, with just bits of '66, '67 and '70 tacked on. And Sir Frank's de Tomaso hardly flattered his talent. Not a lot to go on.

I prefer to recall his fabulous duel with Ickx at Monaco in 1969. Ickx was hot back then and my recollection of the BBC broadcast is that he had Jacky well and truly covered that day.

Had he not perished at Zandvoort, I suspect he would have received offers of works drives and might ultimately have been perceived as worthy of rubbing shoulders (in terms of speed compared with his contemporaries) with the likes of Ickx, Brabham, Rodriguez, Amon, Fittipaldi, Hill and Cevert. Perhaps not quite at a level with Andretti, Gurney, Peterson and Stewart but ahead of such as Siffert, Regazzoni and Hulme.

What thinkest thou?

#26 vintageautomobilia

vintageautomobilia
  • Member

  • 231 posts
  • Joined: September 04

Posted 17 January 2005 - 20:47

Originally posted by Geza Sury

No, Piers crashed fatally a year later, during the Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort.


Thank you, Geza.

I knew it was at the Dutch GP at Zandvoort, which I think was the next race in the schedule, but I wasn't sure which year. I guess I should have looked it up.

#27 Macca

Macca
  • Member

  • 3,577 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 18 January 2005 - 09:19

posted by Vanwall:

Had he not perished at Zandvoort, I suspect he would have received offers of works drives and might ultimately have been perceived as worthy of rubbing shoulders (in terms of speed compared with his contemporaries) with the likes of Ickx, Brabham, Rodriguez, Amon, Fittipaldi, Hill and Cevert. Perhaps not quite at a level with Andretti, Gurney, Peterson and Stewart but ahead of such as Siffert, Regazzoni and Hulme.



According to the biog (highly recommended), he had received an offer from Ferrari for 1970, presumably on the strength of his performances against the known talent of Ickx in a similar car in 1969; also they probably wanted him for the sportscar team.

However he decided to stick with Frank, and drive for Alfa in prototypes..................... :cry:


Paul M

#28 Nanni Dietrich

Nanni Dietrich
  • Member

  • 1,329 posts
  • Joined: February 04

Posted 19 January 2005 - 11:33

If my memory helps me, Piers Courage at the end of 1969 didn't sign for Ferrari because he had already signed for Alfa Romeo to drive the 33.3 in the WSC 1970.

He began the season running at Baires with Andrea De Adamich 11 Jan 1970 the 1000 Km (6th over all), and again 18 Jan. 1970 winning the 200 Miles.

I think he was one of the greatest natural driver: during practice at the Targa Florio 1970 (his first attempt in the infernal Madonie 72 km. circuit) he got the 4th time, just after Siffert, Elford and Vaccarella :eek: and in front of Rodriguez, Van Lennep, Larrousse and other road specialists...

#29 ricardo1954

ricardo1954
  • Member

  • 73 posts
  • Joined: August 04

Posted 24 January 2005 - 22:34

I know others wins of Piers Courage in F-3 :

1965 - april/10 - Goodwood
may/15 - Silverstone
june/06 - Brands Hatch
june/07 - Goodwood
june/20 - Caserta
july/11 - Rouen
july/24 - Silverstone
august/21 - Oulton Park
october/02 - Silverstone
december/26 - Brands Hatch
all in a Brabham BT-10

1966 - april/17 - Pau
may/08 - Brands Hatch
may/29 - Brands Hatch
july/10 - Rouen
august/29 - Brands Hatch
september/25 - Albi
all in a Lotus 41

Is this results right?

Ricardo Cunha

#30 brooster51

brooster51
  • Member

  • 210 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 27 January 2005 - 06:16

Ricardo1954

I don't can't find a race at Goodwood on April 9th, 1965, but otherwise I think I can match them up. For 1965, Piers won 9 races (excluding the 4/10 win that I can't find), 3 seconds, 2 thirds, 1 fourth, 3 finishes less than sixth, 7 retirements, 6 poles, and 7 fastest race laps. A ratio of 36% wins and 56% podiums out of 25 races. Thats a good score especially considering some of the others he was competing against: Roy Pike, Jonathan Williams, Charles Crichton-Stuart, Peter Gethin, and John Fenning who were all considered the class of F3.

I'll look at 66 tomorrow.

Brooster51

#31 brooster51

brooster51
  • Member

  • 210 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 29 January 2005 - 04:31

Ricardo1954

This is what I can find for PCs 66 season. The wins agree with your list.

(The following is sorted by race result and then date, PP = Pole Position, FL = Fastest Race Lap, NC = Not Classified, R = Retired)

04.17 XXV Grand Prix Automobile de Pau - Formule 3, Circuit de Pau 1//FL
05.08 Les Leston Trophy, Brands Hatch Circuit 1/PP/FL
05.29 £ 500 Les Leston Trophy, Brands Hatch Circuit 1//FL
07.10 VI Coupe de l'A.C. Normand, Circuit de Rouen-les-Essarts 1//FL
08.29 Les Leston International Trophy, Brands Hatch Circuit 1//FL
09.25 III Coupe de Vitesse d'Albi, Circuit d'Albi 1//FL
05.30 Bromley Bowl, Crystal Palace Circuit 2//FL
08.21 XV Kanonloppet, Gelleråsbanan 2
10.02 I European Formula 3 International Challenge, Brands Hatch Circuit 2
07.03 X Coupe de Vitesse Formule 3, Circuit de Reims-Gueux 3
09.11 Corsa dei Campioni, Ente Autodromo di Pergusa 4
04.24 IV Trofeo Juan Jover, Montjuïc Park 5
05.01 XV Trofeo Bruno e Fofi Vigorelli, Autodromo Nazionale di Monza 6
04.11 Chichester Cup, Goodwood Circuit NC
07.24 W.D. & H.O. Wills Trophy, Silverstone Circuit NC
08.14 Ford Grand Prix, Roskilde Ring NC
04.08 Les Leston Trophy, Snetterton Circuit R
05.14 I Radio London Trophy, Silverstone Circuit R
05.21 VIII Grand Prix de Monaco - Formule 3, Circuit de Monte Carlo R
06.26 VIII Gran Premio della Lotteria di Monza, Autodromo Nazionale di Monza R
09.18 Coupe de Vitesse de Le Mans, Circuit Bugatti au Mans R

Hope this helps

Best regards

#32 ricardo1954

ricardo1954
  • Member

  • 73 posts
  • Joined: August 04

Posted 29 January 2005 - 17:30

brooster51 :

Thank you for yours informations.

Ricardo

#33 aerogi

aerogi
  • Member

  • 103 posts
  • Joined: March 04

Posted 29 January 2005 - 18:49

This happened at the German Grand Prix in 1969.
It was the 2nd lap. After a contact Piers Courage lost the left rear tyre, slipped and his
race was over. Luckily he escaped unharmed. Note in the left picture the wheel
that is going straight to the audience!

Link to a picture of this incident from my website: http://users.pandora.....n GP_1969.jpg

Source: L'automobile magazine (French magazine)

#34 AAA-Eagle

AAA-Eagle
  • Member

  • 1,018 posts
  • Joined: July 04

Posted 21 June 2005 - 20:06

Piers was the eldest son of the chairman of the Courage brewery group, but any thoughts that these connections were an asset to his motor racing aspirations were mistaken. His initial racing experience was gained regularly gyrating the Lotus Seven funded by his father, but after that Piers was on his own as far as finance was concerned. He teamed up with old pal Jonathan Williams in 1964 and the pair terrorised the circuits of Europe, initially with a Lotus 22. Entered under the grandiose Anglo-Swiss Racing Team banner, in reality Courage and Williams lived the sort of hand-to-mouth existence that most privateers had to endure, but third place at Reims and second at Zandvoort in a Brabham encouraged Piers to contest a full F3 season in 1965.

Charles Lucas entered a pair of Brabhams for Piers and Frank Williams, and it proved to be a very successful campaign for Courage, with four wins in major events at Silverstone, Goodwood, Caserta and Reims. This led to an invitation to race the Lotus 41 F3 car for 1966, and although it was inferior to the rival Brabhams Piers still managed a string of wins, earning a ride in Ron Harris' works F2 Lotus in the German GP, where he blotted his copybook by crashing.

BRM signed both Courage and Chris Irwin for 1967, the idea being to run them under the Tim Parnell banner, grooming them for a drive in the works team in the future. It all went sour for Piers very quickly, however, all his good work being repeatedly undone by silly spins. After the Monaco GP, Parnell stuck with Irwin, but Piers had to content himself with a season of Formula 2 in John Coombs' McLaren. His speed was not in doubt and some excellent drives netted him fourth place in the non-graded drivers' championship, but - and it was a big but -the disturbing tendency to crash remained, with major shunts at Pau, Enna and Brands Hatch. Coombs advised him to quit, but Piers was determined to continue.

Early in 1968 he bought the McLaren from Coombs and took it down-under to contest the Tasman series. Pitted against the Lotuses of Clark and Hill, Amon's Ferrari and McLaren's BRM in the seven-race series, Piers was second, fourth, fifth, third, third and fifth before the final round at Longford. In pouring rain Courage simply outdrove the opposition - Clark included - to win the race, but more importantly finally established his credibility.

Turning down an offer to replace the late Jim Clark at Lotus, Piers instead chose to race for Tim Parnell in Grands Prix while teaming up with his old pal Frank Williams in Formula 2, and so successful was their partnership that it was decided to enter F1 with a Brabham in 1969. Aside from a shunt at the Nurburgring, things could hardly have gone better, Courage driving superbly for the fledgling outfit to take second place at Monaco and Watkins Glen. He was also still racing in Formula 2, scoring a win at Enna and five third places, while an invitation to join the Matra team for Le Mans saw Piers take fourth place with Beltoise.

Piers preferred to stay with Frank Williams into the 1970 season instead of accepting an offer from Ferrari. While Williams took the brave and possibly foolhardy step of running the newly constructed de Tomaso-Ford in place of the proven Brabham. The early part of the season was inconclusive with only a third place in the International Trophy to show for their efforts. Meanwhile Piers busied himself in a hectic schedule of endurance events for Alfa Romeo, highlighted by a win with de Adamich in the Buenos Aires 1000 Km. By the time of the Dutch GP at Zandvoort in June, progress seemed to have been made with the de Tomaso, which was placed ninth on the grid, but in the race tragedy struck when Courage slid wide, ran up a bank and crashed. The red car rolled over and burst into flames, and the unfortunate Piers stood no chance.

#35 Macca

Macca
  • Member

  • 3,577 posts
  • Joined: January 03

Posted 22 June 2005 - 08:24

RIP Porridge - seriously good bloke.

PAul M

#36 Martyj

Martyj
  • Member

  • 191 posts
  • Joined: February 00

Posted 22 June 2005 - 14:38

Piers Courage was one of my all time favorites, even though I'll admit he was never top shelf as a driver. Simply an interesting, colorful personality on the 60's GP circuit. That biography from a few years ago is, quite simply, the most enjoyable book on racing that I ever read...even with it's sad ending.

#37 brooster51

brooster51
  • Member

  • 210 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 23 June 2005 - 01:37

Originally posted by Martyj
Piers Courage was one of my all time favorites, even though I'll admit he was never top shelf as a driver. Simply an interesting, colorful personality on the 60's GP circuit. That biography from a few years ago is, quite simply, the most enjoyable book on racing that I ever read...even with it's sad ending.


Porridge was one of my favorites too. But I must respectfully disagree with your assesment that he was not top shelf. I think his career ended way too early to truly know. I look at his time in F3 and it seems to me that he definitely displayed the ability. Whether the small formula skills translated to F1, we'll never truly know. After all, he only had one season with a reasonably competive car (the Williams Brabham).

#38 Reyna

Reyna
  • Member

  • 630 posts
  • Joined: March 02

Posted 23 June 2005 - 01:45

Piers Courage was one of my favorites too !



Posted Image
Source: Fórmula.

#39 brooster51

brooster51
  • Member

  • 210 posts
  • Joined: February 03

Posted 23 June 2005 - 02:42

Way cool picture. Thanks.

Advertisement

#40 Mac Lark

Mac Lark
  • Member

  • 744 posts
  • Joined: April 02

Posted 23 June 2005 - 03:51

Is it true that Piers carried the colours of Eton College on his helmet and that in doing so he was copying Richard Attwood who carried 'his' school colours (Harrow) on his hat?

If that bit is true, are there any other drivers (other than James Hunt) that based their helmet colours on their school?

#41 retriever

retriever
  • Member

  • 557 posts
  • Joined: January 08

Posted 22 June 2010 - 20:33

Sadly, it would appear that the 40th anniversary of his death slipped by without any of us recalling the event - me included.

#42 f1steveuk

f1steveuk
  • Member

  • 3,543 posts
  • Joined: June 04

Posted 23 June 2010 - 10:20

Sadly, it would appear that the 40th anniversary of his death slipped by without any of us recalling the event - me included.



I tend to think of these anniversaries to myself, much as when I drove past Goodwood earlier this month.

I worked with Jason Courage for a short period, and he was always happy to talk about his dad, and the accident that confined him to a wheelchair, a very nice chap, and I am told a real chip of the old block. Everytime I bump into him, he always says hi, and funnily enough, after months of inactivity on his Facebook page, I note he's updated today, maybe just occupying his mind.

#43 Ellis French

Ellis French
  • Member

  • 475 posts
  • Joined: June 06

Posted 23 June 2010 - 10:50

A single frame shot from my 8mm movies taken on the grid that wet victory day at Longford Tasmania in 1968....still have vivid memories of that fine drive .

Posted Image

#44 roger.daltrey

roger.daltrey
  • Member

  • 51 posts
  • Joined: July 06

Posted 23 June 2010 - 20:51

I've got Adam Coopers 'Last of the Gentleman Racers' on my shelf in my office - and its a great book, aside for the inevitable final bit.

I always thought that his story would truly be a great F1 film.

His career spanning two decades and the big change from cigar shaped machines to the 'standard' Lotus 72 type look and as the drivers went from short back/sides to sideburns and long hair.

Its only a short time in history, but big social, cultural and technology changes all occurred at the same time.

Perhaps the Courage story could be some sort of metaphor for an entire generation losing their innocence ??

Anyway, enough of my yakking - discuss...



#45 Russ Snyder

Russ Snyder
  • Member

  • 360 posts
  • Joined: October 07

Posted 24 June 2010 - 14:09

I've got Adam Coopers 'Last of the Gentleman Racers' on my shelf in my office - and its a great book, aside for the inevitable final bit.

I always thought that his story would truly be a great F1 film.

His career spanning two decades and the big change from cigar shaped machines to the 'standard' Lotus 72 type look and as the drivers went from short back/sides to sideburns and long hair.

Its only a short time in history, but big social, cultural and technology changes all occurred at the same time.

Perhaps the Courage story could be some sort of metaphor for an entire generation losing their innocence ??

Anyway, enough of my yakking - discuss...



Agreed on the movie .

With the dearth of quality product being produced in films today, the re-making of TV shows (!) into feature films, certainly a movie about the late 60's early 70's F1 would be a worthwhile addition to my theater going.



#46 SJ Lambert

SJ Lambert
  • Member

  • 5,019 posts
  • Joined: March 09

Posted 24 July 2010 - 11:36

A single frame shot from my 8mm movies taken on the grid that wet victory day at Longford Tasmania in 1968....still have vivid memories of that fine drive .

Posted Image


Bravo Piers! Courage Day!

#47 Longtimefan

Longtimefan
  • Member

  • 3,170 posts
  • Joined: October 08

Posted 21 June 2012 - 13:01

42 Years since his loss.

RIP :(


#48 roger.daltrey

roger.daltrey
  • Member

  • 51 posts
  • Joined: July 06

Posted 21 June 2012 - 14:36

Marked by Peter Windsor with a great front cover

http://peterwindsor....te-front-cover/

#49 BRM MICK2

BRM MICK2
  • Member

  • 87 posts
  • Joined: March 06

Posted 21 June 2012 - 17:33

RIP

#50 jj2728

jj2728
  • Member

  • 2,952 posts
  • Joined: January 04

Posted 21 June 2012 - 19:38

Another year passed. RIP Piers.