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History in the Making - a 'Quadruple Crown of Motor Sport'?


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#1 Vitesse2

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 13:09

We have of course discussed the existence (or otherwise) of a 'Triple Crown of Motor Sport' before. DCN even admitted to (probably) being one of the perpetrators of this semi-mythical title.

 

https://forums.autos...n/#entry1290541

 

It has however been a decade since anyone came close to emulating Graham Hill's achievement of WDC, Indy 500 and Le Mans, when in 2008 - on his second and last appearance - Jacques Villeneuve finished second at Le Mans, missing out on a win by just over four and a half minutes. He seems to have forgotten that in 2007 he said he would continue to run at Le Mans until he won it ...

 

Today we've seen Fernando Alonso become the 25th driver to win Le Mans at his first attempt (or the 23rd if you discount Messrs Lagache and Leonard in the first race in 1923). Last year he ran very impressively at Indianapolis, leading 27 laps before having to retire from 7th place when his Honda engine let go on the front straight. He took to oval racing like the proverbial duck to water and in a statistical quirk has actually already led more laps at the Brickyard than either Graham Hill or Jacques Villeneuve. He's also only done one previous race in sports cars - this year's Daytona 24 Hours.

 

It is strongly rumoured that McLaren intend to undertake a full IndyCar season in 2019 - and of course from both McLaren's and IndyCar's point of view Alonso's presence would be a tremendous draw and could open up the possibility of a 'quadruple crown' if he was able to win both the 500 and the championship. Villeneuve, Mario Andretti and Emerson Fittipaldi - all long retired - all won the 500, the CART title and the WDC, but none of them ever won Le Mans. Fernando is now half way there, but will he achieve all four?

 

On another note, it was nice to see the Porsche GTs sporting replica liveries - one (the class winner) painted in homage to the famous 'Pink Pig' 917 and another in the classic blue, white and red scheme which typified the Rothmans-sponsored cars.



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#2 Collombin

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 13:18

Not quite the proper triple crown, but Alonso is the only driver to win the WDC, the Le Mans 24 Hours, and, er, the Indy 500 rookie of the year.

#3 Tim Murray

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 13:34

Alonso thus becomes the third driver to win at Le Mans having previously won the WDC, but he is the first to do so not having the surname of Hill.

#4 Alan Lewis

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 13:54


A "proper" Quadruple Crown must surely be something like Monaco, Indy, Le Mans and the Monte Carlo Rally - different disciplines?

#5 retriever

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 13:59

One commentator on this year's broadcast alluded to the fact was Le Mans, Monaco and the Indy 500 - but then it was our dear friend Carlton!

 

I thank Vitesse2 for creating this topic even though it has been stirred by a race completed less than an hour ago as it gives me the opportunity to go slightly off topic (well, everyone else does). 

 

Just spare a thought for Anthony Davidson who served Toyota for a good number of years including surviving a horrific crash a few years ago at Le Mans and being in the winning car five times in 2017. Sadly, despite this, he was ousted this year from the Buemi / Nakajima car to make way for Fernando Alonso. He really deserved to be treated better than this.

 

Finally, whatever the number of laps run in front it is first past the flag that counts - and Graham was the first to achieve the triple crown. Nobody should try to distill that fact in any way.


Edited by retriever, 17 June 2018 - 14:47.


#6 Gabrci

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 14:42

Le Mans is awesome, a real, proper motor race, that I understand but I'm totally mystified why a Formula One world champion would be the slightest bit interested in risking their safety in an oval race. They don't need the money and I just don't see what they can gain from turning left a few hundred times in an event that is much more a dangerous, cheap show than a car race.  :well:



#7 Vitesse2

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 15:00

Le Mans is awesome, a real, proper motor race, that I understand but I'm totally mystified why a Formula One world champion would be the slightest bit interested in risking their safety in an oval race. They don't need the money and I just don't see what they can gain from turning left a few hundred times in an event that is much more a dangerous, cheap show than a car race.  :well:

I would venture to suggest that in Fernando's case it is a combination of his interest in all forms of the sport and his desire to prove that he's more than just the one-trick pony role forced on him by recent F1. Oval racing is an art in itself - certainly much more than the 'turning left a few hundred times' cliché - and very few drivers in recent years have been able to succeed consistently on all three sorts of circuits which comprise the current IndyCar series. There are oval specialists and road/street racing specialists, but the combination of all three is hard to achieve. Oddly enough, some of the best in recent years - Franchitti, Dixon, Castroneves, Power, Kanaan and Montoya for example - came from road racing backgrounds and have conquered oval racing. And as was obvious today - and at Indy last year - Fernando loves the less regimented and less hidebound atmosphere outside F1. When he's achieved everything he wants on the tracks I wouldn't put it past him to give the Dakar and/or the Monte a go ...



#8 D28

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 15:02

Alonso thus becomes the third driver to win at Le Mans having previously won the WDC, but he is the first to do so not having the surname of Hill.

Correct, Jochen Rindt and Mike Hawthorn did it the other way round, Le Mans first.

I now make it 9 drivers who have completed 2/3 of the original Graham Hill triple. Alonso must have a good chance of achieving what G Hill did. Well done, I didn't expect anyone would come this close to Hill's feat given the current racing specialization regime.



#9 ensign14

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 15:05

Le Mans is awesome, a real, proper motor race, that I understand but I'm totally mystified why a Formula One world champion would be the slightest bit interested in risking their safety in an oval race.

 

If you have to spend your works weekends driving a GP2 car in F1, you might relish the chance to be at the sharp end.



#10 PRD

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 17:39

W forgotten that in 2007 he said he would continue to run at Le Mans until he won it ...

 

Today we've seen Fernando Alonso become the 25th driver to win Le Mans at his first attempt (or the 23rd if you discount Messrs Lagache and Leonard in the first race in 1923). Last year he ran very impressively at Indianapolis, leading 27 laps before having to retire from 7th place when his Honda engine let go on the front straight. He took to oval racing like the proverbial duck to water and in a statistical quirk has actually already led more laps at the Brickyard than either Graham Hill or Jacques Villeneuve. He's also only done one previous race in sports cars - this year's Daytona 24 Hours.

 

 

 

Didn't Alonso also race at Spa last month?

 

 

You're correct about him being impressive-that night stint was the difference between the two Toyotas. The thought was always there that Toyota would arrange for his car to win, but he made it happen


Edited by PRD, 17 June 2018 - 17:40.


#11 BRG

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 18:42

Le Mans is awesome, a real, proper motor race, that I understand but I'm totally mystified why a Formula One world champion would be the slightest bit interested in risking their safety in an oval race. They don't need the money and I just don't see what they can gain from turning left a few hundred times in an event that is much more a dangerous, cheap show than a car race.  :well:

Well,  Alonso did, and so did Phil and Graham Hill, Jim Clark, Jackie Stewart, Nigel Mansell, Mario Andretti, Jack Brabham....so maybe the mystery is why they didn't agree with you.



#12 D28

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 19:43

Well,  Alonso did, and so did Phil and Graham Hill, Jim Clark, Jackie Stewart, Nigel Mansell, Mario Andretti, Jack Brabham....so maybe the mystery is why they didn't agree with you.

And a few others, but I don't believe Phil Hill ever appeared at Indy in a racing capacity. Can't remember him doing any ovals, but the argument here seems to be Indy.



#13 BRG

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 19:54

And a few others, but I don't believe Phil Hill ever appeared at Indy in a racing capacity. Can't remember him doing any ovals, but the argument here seems to be Indy.

Yes, getting confused with Le Mans where he was a frequent visitor.



#14 F1matt

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 20:16

I always thought Nigel Mansell would have had a proper crack at Le Mans, he loves to mention his back to back F1 and Indycar titles and a new angle on the triple crown would have been right up his street. Maybe he drove at a time when drivers where to single seater centric.

#15 Glengavel

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 20:55

I always thought Nigel Mansell would have had a proper crack at Le Mans, he loves to mention his back to back F1 and Indycar titles and a new angle on the triple crown would have been right up his street. Maybe he drove at a time when drivers where to single seater centric.

 

But poor Nige was an exhausted wreck after a ninety minute Grand Prix, he would never have lasted Le Mans.  ;)



#16 Gabrci

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 20:57

Well,  Alonso did, and so did Phil and Graham Hill, Jim Clark, Jackie Stewart, Nigel Mansell, Mario Andretti, Jack Brabham....so maybe the mystery is why they didn't agree with you.

 

Yes, that's exactly what I am asking. Why did they do that? Was the money that much better in America at that time? Or was it because of marketing purposes of the team? They went there and destroyed the establishment, clearly neither the cars, nor the drivers were in their league. What was the reason for them to go? 



#17 Glengavel

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 21:51

Yes, that's exactly what I am asking. Why did they do that? Was the money that much better in America at that time? Or was it because of marketing purposes of the team? They went there and destroyed the establishment, clearly neither the cars, nor the drivers were in their league. What was the reason for them to go? 

 

In Chapman and Lotus's case, the money; and possibly the prestige.



#18 Ray Bell

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 23:30

Rindt enjoyed his laps there...

By all accounts.

#19 Lee Nicolle

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 02:59

But poor Nige was an exhausted wreck after a ninety minute Grand Prix, he would never have lasted Le Mans.  ;)

Nigel and sons raced Lemans a few years ago? And Nige backed out with back problems from memory



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#20 JonL

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 03:35

 

Didn't Alonso also race at Spa last month?

 

 

 I think he intends to do the complete WEC and try for the championship title. :clap:



#21 john aston

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 06:01

Yes, that's exactly what I am asking. Why did they do that? Was the money that much better in America at that time? Or was it because of marketing purposes of the team? They went there and destroyed the establishment, clearly neither the cars, nor the drivers were in their league. What was the reason for them to go? 

Because, unlike now , motor sport was multi disciplinary , and nobody raised an eyebrow at a driver racing in different series. Look at Vic Elford in 67 - wins Monte Carlo Rally, then 24 hours of Daytona the following week, then finishes 4th in first GP . 

 

F1 and many of its fans have their heads   so far up F1's corporate backside that they think F1 is the centre of it sown petty little universe  - but that's the daft thinking you get when all you can see is crap   



#22 Stephen W

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 07:07

Well,  Alonso did, and so did Phil and Graham Hill, Jim Clark, Jackie Stewart, Nigel Mansell, Mario Andretti, Jack Brabham....so maybe the mystery is why they didn't agree with you.

 

You forgot Denny Hulme.



#23 ChrisJson

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 07:40


It has however been a decade since anyone came close to emulating Graham Hill's achievement of WDC, Indy 500 and Le Mans

I have always thought it was the Monaco Grand Prix that counted, not the WDC.

Hence Juan Pablo Montoya also had the chance to achieve it yesterday.

 

Christer



#24 john winfield

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 07:49

I have always thought it was the Monaco Grand Prix that counted, not the WDC.

Hence Juan Pablo Montoya also had the chance to achieve it yesterday.

 

Christer

 

Choose any Triple Crown you like Christer!  The BBC's Andrew Benson (ex-Autosport) agrees with you. I like WDC, Can-Am champion, Tourist Trophy......Denny Hulme! (....and just a whisker away from winning Le Mans too).

 

https://www.bbc.co.u...rsport/44510955



#25 2F-001

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 08:08

I, too, have always thought it a little odd to align a major championship title with two individual events - however famous, difficult or prestigious.

 

Hulme's 'triple' (as mentioned above by John) is a good one; why is that so many of Denny's achievements are overlooked?

 

Mind you, a win at Le Mans, a Can Am crown, and winning at Spa in an F1 car with one's own name on the badge is quite something too...

 

(Or any one of many combinations of wins by Donohue...)



#26 Vitesse2

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 08:22

I have always thought it was the Monaco Grand Prix that counted, not the WDC.

Hence Juan Pablo Montoya also had the chance to achieve it yesterday.

 

Christer

If you have a look at the OP in the thread I linked in the first post of this one, you'll see that it was actually founded on that very premise. In 2003.  ;) And as Doug said:

 

I wouldn't swear to it, but I've got a feeling that back in 1972 or whenever it was, I was one of the first blokes to waffle on about Graham Hill having achieved an unofficial 'triple crown' of motor racing's pinnacle achievements - at THAT TIME some things were unargued:

There will always be disagreements about what the 'triple crown' actually is - as retriever noted above, you're in the same camp as Carlton Kirby. Or even if it really exists (see the comments of Messrs McKinney and Capps!) That's why I called it semi-mythical. In that thread I called it a red herring.



#27 Roger Clark

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 08:29

Is Fernando Alonso the first driver to have publicly sought this Triple Crown? I don’t think Graham Hill had any such thoughts when he drove for Matra.

#28 ensign14

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 08:39

Jacques Villeneuve?



#29 PlayboyRacer

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 08:48

I think Jacques was well and truly after it, massive shame he couldn't get it done in 2008 with Peugeot. Also a shame he never returned... he'd have been a certified legend with a Le Mans win added to his CV.

I hope Fernando switches his attention to IndyCar now, a title there and the Indy 500 would be awesome. As alluded to earlier, only 3 men have the 'open wheel triple' of F1 WDC, IndyCar title and Indy 500.

Edited by PlayboyRacer, 18 June 2018 - 08:51.


#30 john winfield

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 09:36

I'm fairly sure the commentators mentioned the 'triple crown' at Le Mans in 1995, although I can't recall whether Mario Andretti ever did himself. Such a shame for him and Bob Wollek that, for the sake of losing five seconds and lapping a car after the Porsche Curves, Mario went for it instead, ended up in the barriers and lost six laps in the pits. Their Courage lost the race by one lap. Another racing 'what if' !



#31 Charlieman

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 10:40

In Chapman and Lotus's case, the money; and possibly the prestige.

Cooper and Jack Brabham had concluded that the Indy 500 was worth a go in 1961 even though it required a modified chassis (the F1 design was too small) and a custom engine. Dunlop provided special tyres but unsurprisingly they weren't entirely suitable and the Cooper was unable to race at its full potential. A minor place and commercial sponsorship were enough that the exercise was not a financial disaster but insufficient for Cooper to return. Other British manufacturers thought differently a few years later.

 

Cooper were not the first Europeans to build Indy 500 specials, of course. USAC and F1 rules were divergent so opportunities were limited. The 1965 winning Lotus was a design inspired by GP racing rather than a modified GP car. The financial aspect was very important -- as it was for Can Am. The big GP teams built customer cars and raced in other categories to make money. Cooper came to an end, sadly, because other firms made better customer racing cars. Today, big GP teams place young drivers with teams running spec cars in junior categories. Junior categories are a cost to F1 teams rather than an income source.

 

And that brings us back to 2018. I don't know how much prize or starting money is available at any major event nowadays; it's all hush hush. F1 operates with a bizarre grasp on financial reality and manufacturer LMP1 racing isn't much different. Indy car racing uses spec designs to keep costs down. Fernando Alonso has enough personal wealth to set up his own Indy car team as a hobby...



#32 JtP2

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 10:49

I personally feel that too much time and internet posts are being spent on the Alonso PR machine. He reckons there are sll these drivers out there wit trophys that are worthless and yet seems to be spending his time chasing trophys. Is this an attempt to cover up the fact that he struggles to out qualify Vandoorne?



#33 cpbell

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 11:25

I personally feel that too much time and internet posts are being spent on the Alonso PR machine. He reckons there are sll these drivers out there wit trophys that are worthless and yet seems to be spending his time chasing trophys. Is this an attempt to cover up the fact that he struggles to out qualify Vandoorne?

Alonso himself has admitted that his weaknesses as a driver are qualifying and wet weather, though I'd suggest that this is only the case inasmuch as he is average as opposed to actually weak.  In my opinion, he combines a large percentage of the precision and ease of Clark, the relentlessness of Stewart and the racecraft of Lauda in one driver, though he isn't as great in each individual aspect as were those drivers.


Edited by cpbell, 18 June 2018 - 11:25.


#34 D28

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 13:29

Jacques Villeneuve and Peugeot were well aware of the importance of a Le Mans win as a final link to his Triple Crown.

Likewise Mario Andretti whether he  specifically mentioned it or not, he really wanted that Le Mans win. Neither driver won at Monaco, or really went well there.



#35 Michael Ferner

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 13:37

Indy is awesome, a real, proper motor race, that I understand but I'm totally mystified why a Formula One world champion would be the slightest bit interested in risking their safety at Le Mans. They don't need the money and I just don't see what they can gain from droning around for 24 hours in an event that is much more a dangerous, cheap carneval than a car race. :well:


Besides, any proper Triple or Quadruple Crown needs at least one short track event; how about the Knoxville Nationals - it's even dirt to add to the variety aspect! :) In any case, there is already a Quadruple Crown of auto racing, the Four Crown Nationals at Eldora Speedway: Champ cars, Sprints, Midgets and Super Modifieds. Jack Hewitt won all four of them in a single day - beat that!

#36 Doug Nye

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 14:01

There is so much twaddle being spared around in the general media - and the inexperienced specialist media - about this mythical 'Triple Crown' involving victory in the Le Mans 24-Hour race, victory at Indy...and victory in the Monaco GP...?     :confused:

 

Sure, Graham Hill achieved each of those successes - but in period, I promise you, the 'Triple Crown' was assessed as reflecting Graham's win at Le Mans, victory at Indy, and victory in winning the Formula 1 Drivers' World Championship title.  Despite his five wins in the Monaco GP the glitzy bling event was NOT included.  

 

In much more recent years the Masten Gregory fan made a fuss here about this 'Trifecta' actually including - somehow - the Pocono '500'for reasons too tediously wearing for me to recall.

 

But the Monaco GP providing one leg of the tripod?  NO!    :mad:

 

DCN



#37 D28

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 14:21

There is so much twaddle being spared around in the general media - and the inexperienced specialist media - about this mythical 'Triple Crown' involving victory in the Le Mans 24-Hour race, victory at Indy...and victory in the Monaco GP...?     :confused:

 

Sure, Graham Hill achieved each of those successes - but in period, I promise you, the 'Triple Crown' was assessed as reflecting Graham's win at Le Mans, victory at Indy, and victory in winning the Formula 1 Drivers' World Championship title.  Despite his five wins in the Monaco GP the glitzy bling event was NOT included.  

 

In much more recent years the Masten Gregory fan made a fuss here about this 'Trifecta' actually including - somehow - the Pocono '500'for reasons too tediously wearing for me to recall.

 

But the Monaco GP providing one leg of the tripod?  NO!    :mad:

 

DCN

I agree, that was always my understanding of the term. But the drum beating to have Monaco included is relentless and now probably unstoppable all the more so as Wiki has declared it to be.. 

Of course it is whatever one says, but it is unfortunate that the original definition was not adhered to. The worth of such an informal crown is that everyone agrees to the terms, as in the US horse racing example. I see small chance of that now and that is unfortunate.


Edited by D28, 19 June 2018 - 00:57.


#38 BRG

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 14:30

Is Fernando Alonso the first driver to have publicly sought this Triple Crown? I don’t think Graham Hill had any such thoughts when he drove for Matra.

I don't think Alonso has ever publicly said that he is after this distinction, has he?.  It is a label that people have pinned on him, I believe.  He just wants to win races, which is an entirely admirable ambition for a proper racing driver

 

Is this an attempt to cover up the fact that he struggles to out qualify Vandoorne?

Hasn't he beaten Vandoorne in pretty well every qualifying session and every race so far?  He seems to be comfortably better than is team-mate.

 


But the Monaco GP providing one leg of the tripod?  NO!    :mad:

 

DCN

Calm down, dear, it's only a made-up thing.  Be it F1 WDC or Monaco GP, either way, Norman Graham Hill has it in the bag, and no-one else will  ever be the first to achieve it.



#39 Glengavel

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 14:32

If you had to include a single F1 race it would have to be the Italian Grand Prix, as that is the only one that has been run most times over the same (more-or-less) track.

 

Besides, Jim Clark never won at Monaco...



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#40 Michael Ferner

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 14:32

In much more recent years the Masten Gregory fan made a fuss here about this 'Trifecta' actually including - somehow - the Pocono '500'for reasons too tediously wearing for me to recall.


Easy! The Pocono Raceway has three turns! :D

:rotfl:


As for a single race replacing the WDC series title, surely that would have to be THE Grand Prix, i.e. the French one. Unfortunately, NGH never placed better than second there... :well:

#41 guiporsche

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 15:40

Maybe once half of the F1 grid wins some sort of 'Triple Crown' the media in charge will make it more appealing by adding a WRC event (Monte Carlo; or, why not, the 1000 Lakes) and the Daytona 500 to the list. Then things will get very interesting indeed.

 

Anyway, I can't but be amused at how the Triple Crown was brought back from the underworld in these past two years thanks to a top F1 driver who made some very questionable career choices, and to a F1 team going through some terrible times and in need of good publicity.

Regardless of Alonso's racing achievements (which obviously I do not question and can only admire), if there was ever an example of motorsports media spin, this is it.



#42 Arjan de Roos

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 16:09

Correct, Jochen Rindt and Mike Hawthorn did it the other way round, Le Mans first.

I now make it 9 drivers who have completed 2/3 of the original Graham Hill triple. Alonso must have a good chance of achieving what G Hill did. Well done, I didn't expect anyone would come this close to Hill's feat given the current racing specialization regime.

 

10, Nuvolari is to be added as winner of the 1932 championship and 1933 Le Mans. This is TNF of course!! He must have had a premonition of what Doug waffled in June 1972 as he went to Indy to have a look at it all. But we discussed in another thread.

 

BTW I was at Le Mans and found Jenson Button's perform pretty strong, he did not have a car that could only loose, and performed and will return for more surely.



#43 Doug Nye

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 16:30

 

Calm down, dear, it's only a made-up thing.  Be it F1 WDC or Monaco GP, either way, Norman Graham Hill has it in the bag, and no-one else will  ever be the first to achieve it.

 

Aah yes - thank you, thank you.  You are of course completely right...    :smoking:

 

DCN



#44 Collombin

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 17:04

I don't think Alonso has ever publicly said that he is after this distinction, has he?. It is a label that people have pinned on him, I believe.


I think in a Motor Sport interview a couple of years ago he did express his interest in winning the triple crown. I don't recall his exact words so he may not have used that actual expression, but he certainly singled out Indy and Le Mans.

#45 retriever

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 17:31


 

But the Monaco GP providing one leg of the tripod?  NO!    :mad:

 

DCN

 

 

Fully agree, the race once had some cache especially as overtaking was achievable, but that is long ago back in the 20th century. Today it's virtually a boring procession, this year's event reinforces that fact. 



#46 D28

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 18:44

10, Nuvolari is to be added as winner of the 1932 championship and 1933 Le Mans. This is TNF of course!! He must have had a premonition of what Doug waffled in June 1972 as he went to Indy to have a look at it all. But we discussed in another thread.

 

 

Fine, I have no problem including Tazio on any list of racing achievements. Indy is the only major race he didn't win or even appear in. Had not the war intervened he probably would have. And he did win in the US, at the Vanderbilt Cup race. 



#47 PayasYouRace

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 19:57

Aah yes - thank you, thank you. You are of course completely right... :smoking:

DCN


And Alonso has two WDCs and two Monaco GPs so if he completes it it won’t matter either.

#48 Doug Nye

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 20:35

Hmm - WDC?  

 

"World Drivers' Championship".  

 

How does one drive a world?  

 

And the really important factor is that it is a World Championship.  Being a Drivers' Championship is surely secondary to that global status?

 

So shouldn't it really be expressed as Drivers' World Championship - DWC?

 

Grumpy Old Git.

 

DCN



#49 john winfield

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 20:45

Hmm - WDC?  

 

"World Drivers' Championship".  

 

How does one drive a world?  

 

And the really important factor is that it is a World Championship.  Being a Drivers' Championship is surely secondary to that global status?

 

So shouldn't it really be expressed as Drivers' World Championship - DWC?

 

Grumpy Old Git.

 

DCN

 

Grumpy Old Git, or Old Grumpy Git?   :wave:



#50 PayasYouRace

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 20:50

World Drivers’s Championship
World Constructors’ Championship
World Endurance Championship
World Sportscar Championship
World Rally Championship
World Rallycross Championship
World Touring Car Championship
Etc, etc

Seem to be the standard form. Oddly, “Formula One World Championship” seems to be the exception.